People

Participants are Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers, and untenured faculty within 7 years of their Ph.D.

Leadership



Image of Chris Bail
Chris Bail
Chris Bail is Co-Founder of SICSS and Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University where he directs the Polarization Lab. He is also affiliated with the Interdisciplinary Data Science Program, the Duke Network Analysis Center, and the Duke Population Research Institute. His research examines political polarization, culture and social psychology using tools from the field of computational social science. He is the author of Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream.
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Image of Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik is Co-Founder of SICSS and Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and he is affiliated with several of Princeton's interdisciplinary research centers: the Office for Population Research, the Center for Information Technology Policy, the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research interests include social networks and computational social science. He is the author of Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.
Website
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Carrie Hamilton
Carrie Hamilton is the Administrative Director of SICSS and a program assistant for the Social Data Initiative at the Social Science Research Council. Prior to joining the SSRC, she worked as a research technician at the Center for the Study of Adolescent Risk and Resilience at Duke University. She graduated with highest honors from UNC Chapel Hill in 2017 with a BS in environmental science and geography. At UNC, she conducted independent research projects through the National Science Foundation and Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program and spent a year living and working in Ecuador through UNC’s Global Gap Year Fellowship.

2020


Bay Area

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Image of Sharad Goel
Sharad Goel
Sharad Goel is an assistant professor at Stanford in the Department of Management Science & Engineering, in the School of Engineering. He also has courtesy appointments in Computer Science, Sociology, and the Law School. His primary area of research is computational social science, an emerging discipline at the intersection of computer science, statistics, and the social sciences. Sharad is particularly interested in applying modern computational and statistical techniques to understand and improve public policy. Sharad is the founder and executive director of the Stanford Computational Policy Lab, a team of researchers, data scientists, and journalists that addresses policy problems through technical innovation.
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Image of David Harding
David Harding
David Harding (Ph.D. Harvard, 2005) is a Professor of Sociology and Faculty Director, Social Science D-Lab at at University of California, Berkeley. David J. Harding has taught quantitative methods for over ten years at both the University of Michigan and UC Berkeley. In his own research, he has used various methods for causal inference, including propensity score matching, sensitivity analysis, inverse probability of treatment weighting, panel data models, regression with residuals, field experiments, and natural experiments. His recent work has appeared in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, and Nature Human Behaviour, among other journals.
Website
Image of Jae Yeon Kim
Jae Yeon Kim
Jae Yeon Kim is a PhD candidate in Political Science, a D-Lab data science fellow, and a data science education program fellow at UC Berkeley. He uses behavioral science, statistics, and data science tools to study how people think and behave with a focus on diversity and inclusion issues. His award-winning dissertation applies computational, statistical, and qualitative methods to understand what unites racial minority groups in the United States. His most recent research interest is narrowing the gap between the ethics and practice of using machine learning.
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Image of Jaren Haber
Jaren Haber
Jaren Haber is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research applies computational methods to study how organizational contexts shape the impacts of structural inequalities. Jaren has studied whether charter school identities reinforce stratification by race and class, and at SICSS 2019 he joined Nick and Jae (fellow BAY-SICSS organizers) to conduct experiments evidencing how school websites' racial cues influence perceptions of school quality. He also studies text analysis workflows for social science. Jaren is currently on the job market and appreciates referrals.
Website
Image of Nick Camp
Nick Camp
Nick Camp is a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, where he received his PhD in social psychology in 2018. His research examines racial disparities in the everyday encounters between police officers and citizens, drawing on a range of methods, from computational studies of officer body-worn camera footage, experiments in community and lab settings, to analyses of traffic stop data. Starting Fall 2020, Nick will be an assistant professor of Organizational Studies at the University of Michigan.
Website
Image of AJ Alvero
AJ Alvero
AJ is a PhD candidate in Education at Stanford University. His research lies at the intersection of the sociology of education, sociolinguistics, and data science. His ongoing dissertation work examines a large corpus of college admissions essays written by Latinx identifying students to understand the relationships between an applicant's context and the content of their essay. Outside of research, AJ has experience with activism and advocacy in his hometown of Salinas, CA. Prior to starting the PhD program, AJ was a high school English teacher in Miami, FL.
Image of Emily Grabowski
Emily Grabowski
Emily Grabowski is a PhD student in linguistics at UC Berkeley. Her research combines computational and experimental approaches to investigate the relationship between speech perception and production. She also explores applications of machine learning to speech, including the use of supervised and unsupervised methods to discover structure and applications in speech.
Image of Irene Farah
Irene Farah
Irene is a PhD student in City & Regional Planning at UC Berkeley. Irene’s interests lie at the intersection of sociology, public health, and urban analytics. Her current research examines how macro socioeconomic and political structures affect low-income individuals’ health outcomes in cities. In particular, the role that big corporations play in structuring the food environment and how it affects ultra-processed food exposure at different spatial scales.
Image of Mahnaz Roshanaei
Mahnaz Roshanaei
Mahnaz is a Postdoc research fellow at Stanford University. She is a computer scientist with data science skills who is interested to collaborate across disciplines and develop and apply statistical and machine learning methods on social science issues. Her current research focuses on applying computational methods to understand behavioral, network and smartphone data to explore how the individuals’ characteristics and behavior shape their position in, or effect on, social networks. Mahnaz is broadly interested in Machine learning and Causal inference to reason better with behavioral and network data to solve societal problems.
Image of Saqib Mumtaz
Saqib Mumtaz
Saqib is a PhD student at the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley. He completed a bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology and a master's degree in Public Policy from the Goldman School of Public Policy. He previously worked on technology policy issues in the Indian context. His research interests include entrepreneurship, technology and innovation policy, and social networks.
Image of Tyler McDaniel
Tyler McDaniel
Tyler is a PhD student studying sociology at Stanford University. His current research focuses on school policies and individuals’ daily experiences with segregation. Using survey data, he compares racial and socioeconomic segregation experienced - in locations such as friends’ homes, places of worship, and shopping centers - by students who make different school choices. Broadly, he is interested in spatial inequalities, meritocracy, and predictive algorithms.

Howard-Mathematica

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Image of Naniette H. Coleman
Naniette H. Coleman
Naniette H. Coleman is a PhD candidate in the Sociology Department at the University of California Berkeley and a UC-National Lab In-Residence Graduate Fellow at Los Alamos National Lab. Since 2016 Naniette has directed the AAC&U award winning Interdisciplinary Research Group on Privacy at Berkeley. Naniette is an affiliate of the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, the Center for Long-term Cybersecurity, and the Center for Technology, Society, and Policy at Berkeley as well as the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and Berkman-Klein Center for the Internet and Society at Harvard University. Naniette’s research sits at the intersection of the sociology of culture and organizations and focuses on cybersecurity, surveillance, and privacy in the US context. Specifically Naniette’s research examines how organizations assess risk, make decisions, and respond to data breaches and organizational compliance with state, federal, and international privacy laws. Naniette holds a Master of Public Administration with a specialization in Democracy, Politics, and Institutions from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and both an M.A. in Economics and a B.A. in Communication from the University at Buffalo, SUNY. A non-traditional student, Naniette’s prior professional experience includes local, state, and federal service, as well as work for two international organizations, and two universities.
Website
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HSE University

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Image of Elizaveta Sivak
Elizaveta Sivak
Elizaveta Sivak is a director of the Center for Modern Childhood Research at Higher School of Economics. She uses qualitative, quantitative, and computational methods to study childhood and parenting. Her main research interests are concerned with modern parenting cultures, children’s behavior and social networks, factors influencing children’s psychological well-being, and how we can study behavior, attitudes and psychological well-being using digital traces. She is also interested in gender and educational inequality, and sociology of science.
Website
Image of Sofia Dokuka
Sofia Dokuka
Sofia Dokuka is Research Fellow in the Computational social science lab at Higher School of Economics. Her research interests include social networks, agent-based models and computational social science. Her academic work focuses on social networks in online environment and education, individual well-being and people analytics. In her recent research Sofia is investigating the interaction between sleep patterns and academic performance based on survey data and digital traces.
Website
Image of Ivan Smirnov
Ivan Smirnov
Ivan Smirnov is Head of the Computational Social Science Lab and Leading Research Fellow at Higher School of Economics. He employs data science to better understand human behavior and complex social phenomena. His main research focus is on inequality and well-being in the digital age.
Website
Image of Lev Manovich
Lev Manovich
Dr. Lev Manovich is one the leading theorists of digital culture worldwide, and a pioneer in application of data science for analysis of contemporary culture. Manovich is the author and editor of 13 books including AI Aesthetics, Theories of Software Culture, Instagram and Contemporary Image, Software Takes Command, Soft Cinema: Navigating the Database and The Language of New Media which was described as "the most suggestive and broad ranging media history since Marshall McLuhan." He was included in the list of '25 People Shaping the Future of Design' in 2013 and the list of '50 Most Interesting People Building the Future' in 2014. Manovich is a Presidential Professor in PhD Program in Computer Science at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and a Director of the Cultural Analytics Lab that pioneered analysis of visual culture using computational methods. The lab created projects for Museum of Modern Art (NYC), New York Public Library, Google and other clients.
Website
Image of Marc Santolini
Marc Santolini
Marc Santolini is a long-term research fellow and team leader at CRI research (Paris) and a visiting researcher at the Barabasi Lab (Network Science Institute at Northeastern University, Boston). He is also the co-founder of Just One Giant Lab, a nonprofit initiative aimed at developing decentralized open science challenges using smart digital tools. Trained as a theoretical physicist at ENS Paris and Princeton University, he developed a strong interest in the universal organisational properties observed in real-world networks in various domains, leading him to work as a postdoc at the Barabasi Lab in Northeastern Univeristy and Harvard Medical School. He now leads a team at the Center for Research and Interdisciplinarity in Paris to unravel how communities innovate, learn and solve complex problems using network approaches on large empirical datasets, with the end goal to develop tools fostering collective intelligence for social impact.
Website

Image of Anastasia Karpova
Anastasia Karpova
Anastasia is currently pursuing her bachelor degree in economics from Higher school of economics (HSE). She was a teaching assistant for many statistical and data science courses at HSE. She is interested in computational methods in macroeconomics, marketing and social sciences.
Website
Image of Alex Knorre
Alex Knorre
Alex Knorre is a Ph.D. student in Criminology at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also an affiliated researcher for the Institute for the Rule of Law at the European University at Saint Petersburg. Alex is interested in illegal online drug markets, gun violence, and Russian criminal justice, and extensively uses R for his research.
Website

Milano

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Image of Nicolò Cavalli
Nicolò Cavalli
Nicolò is a DPhil candidate in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford and a Postdoctoral researcher at Bocconi’s Ifamid group, working on intergroup relations and computational approaches to the study of identities and life course transitions. He holds a BA in Politics from the University of Bologna and an MSc in Economics and Social Sciences from Bocconi. He was a participant to SICSS-2018 at Duke University and a co-organiser to SICSS-Oxford in 2019.
Image of Taylor Brown
Taylor Brown
Based in New York, Taylor Brown is a doctoral candidate in the Duke Sociology department, with association at the Duke Network Analysis Center. She has broad interests in computational methods and social media studies. Her dissertation explores gender inequality in creative professions. Taylor holds an MA in sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill and an MSc in evidence-based social intervention from the University of Oxford. Prior to beginning her PhD, Taylor fulfilled an appointment at the National Science Foundation in the division of Social and Economic Sciences. SICSS TA 2017 & 2018, co-organizer to SICSS-Oxford 2019 & SICSS-NYU 2020.
Website
Arnstein Aassve
Professor of Demography at Bocconi University
Website
Francesco Billari
Professor of Demography and Dean of the Faculty at Bocconi University
Website
Paul Matthew Loveless
Associate Professor in the Department of Political and Social Sciences at the University of Bologna
Website
Marco Albertini
Associate Professor in the Department of Political and Social Sciences at the University of Bologna
Website
Image of Milena Tsvetkova
Milena Tsvetkova
Milena Tsvetkova is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Methodology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She completed her PhD in Sociology at Cornell University in 2015. Prior to joining LSE, she was a Postdoctoral Researcher in Computational Social Science at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. Milena’s research interests lie in the fields of computational and experimental social science. In her research, she uses large-scale web-based social interaction experiments, network analysis of online data, and agent-based modeling to investigate fundamental social phenomena such as cooperation, social contagion, segregation, and inequality.
Website

Istanbul

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Matti Nelimarkka
Matti Nelimarkka is a researcher at the Department of Computer Science, Aalto University. He examines the intersections of political science and data science as well as political science and human-computer interaction. His current work focuses on racism in hybrid media systems, circulation of news, political polarization, agendas in political communication, power of algorithmic systems and politics in human-computer interaction.
Website
Image of Akın Ünver
Akın Ünver
Akin Ünver is an assistant professor of International Relations at Kadir Has University, specialising in conflict research, computational methods and digital crisis communication. He is the Resident Fellow of Cyber Research Program at the Centre for Economic and Foreign Policy Research (EDAM), a Research Associate at the Center for Technology and Global Affairs, Oxford University and a Senior Research Fellow at GUARD (Global Urban Analytics for Resilient Defence) at the Alan Turing Institute.
Website


Image of Damla Partanaz
Damla Partanaz
She is a Ph.D. student in Management Information Systems at Kadir Has University and works there as a visiting research assistant. She has completed her master’s degree in New Media and comes from an Interactive Media Design background. Damla is interested in design implications of Artificial Intelligence, Human-Machine Collaboration, mental models and system design. Currently, she is working on her system design project in which human creativity meets with machine learning in coping with undesired behavior models. She is also in the design committee of Kadir Has University’s Computational Thinking undergraduate program curriculum.
Image of Yunus Emre Tapan
Yunus Emre Tapan
Yunus Emre Tapan is currently doing his Ph.D. in International Relations at Kadir Has University. His research interests are at the intersection between data science and social sciences. He is employing social network analysis and computational text analysis methods to study online communities with a particular focus on radicalization and extremism. He gained his Bachelor's degree in Economics from Bogazici University and his Master's degree in Middle East Studies from Middle Eastern Technical University. He was one of the participants of SICSS-Helsinki in 2018 and one of the teaching assistants of SICSS-Istanbul in 2019.
Website

Beijing

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Image of Yan Leng
Yan Leng
Yan Leng is a Ph.D. candidate at the MIT Media Lab. She will join the McCombs School of Business, the University of Texas at Austin as an Assistant Professor in Fall 2020. She holds master degrees in Computer Science and Transportation Engineering, both from MIT. Yan is a network scientist working on social science problems. Her research lies in the intersection of machine learning, network theory, and causal inference. She uses large-scale behavioral data to understand collective human behavior over social networks and builds computational techniques for solving societal and organizational issues.
Website
Image of Jar-Der Luo
Jar-Der Luo
Luo Jar-Der is a professor of Sociology Dept., Tsinghua University in Beijing, director of Tsinghua Social Network Research Center. He earned his Ph.D degree in Sociology Dept. of State U. of New York at Stony Brook. He researches numerous topics in social network studies, including social capital, trust, social network in big data, self-organization process and Chinese indigenous management researches, such as guanxi, guanxi circle, and favor exchanges.
Website
Image of Margaret Ng
Margaret Ng
Margaret Ng is an Assistant Professor of Journalism and Computer Science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her current research is on (1) technology use discontinuance, (2) technology and information diffusion, and (3) social media in news contexts. Methodologically, she takes a hybrid approach that combines big data, machine learning, as well as survey, and experimental research on media platforms. She received her Ph.D. in Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. Ng was an advanced analytics intern at Pew Research Center’s Data Labs and worked as a news artist at National Geographic Magazine, The Seattle Times and a data reporter for The Center for Public Integrity.
Website
Image of Jie Tang
Jie Tang
Jie Tang a Full Professor and the Associate Chair of the Department of Computer Science and Technology of Tsinghua University. He obtained my Ph.D. in DCST of Tsinghua University in 2006. His research interests include artificial intelligence, data mining, social networks , machine learning and knowledge graph, with an emphasis on designing new algorithms for mining social and knowledge networks. Dr. Tang has published more than 200 journal/conference papers and hold 20 patents. He served as PC Co-Chair of CIKM’16, WSDM’15, Associate General Chair of KDD’18, and Acting Editor-in-Chief of ACM TKDD, Editors of IEEE TKDE, IEEE TBD, and ACM TIST. He is leading the project AMiner.org for academic social network analysis and mining, which has attracted more than 10 million independent IP accesses from 220 countries/regions in the world. He was honored with the UK Royal Society-Newton Advanced Fellowship Award, CCF Young Scientist Award, NSFC for Distinguished Young Scholar, and KDD’18 Service Award.
Website
Image of Yuan Yuan
Yuan Yuan
Yuan Yuan is a PhD Candidate in the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society (IDSS) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He researches social and economic networks by applying cutting-edge computational methods, including machine learning, causal inference, and experimental design, to large-scale network data. He is especially interested in how social ties are formed and stabilized, and how social ties mediate social contagion, social exchange, prosocial behavior, and information diffusion. Yuan’s thesis advisor is Prof. Sandy Pentland. Yuan considers himself as a computational social scientist who cares a lot about research methodology.
Website
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Sandro Lera
Sandro is assistant professor at the Shenzhen based ETH Zurich-SUSTech Institute of Risk Analysis, Prediction and Management (Risks-X). He received his PhD from the Singapore ETH-Centre for Future Resilient Systems and worked as postdoctoral researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (IDSS). He holds a BSc and MSc in Physics from ETH Zurich. He studies the effects of feedback mechanisms in socio-economic systems with tools from statistical physics. Beyond his academic interests, he has also been collaborating with various industry partners, where he has translated these concepts into trading strategies and tools for risk-monitoring.
Website


Helsinki

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Coming soon...




Oxford

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Image of Ridhi Kashyap
Ridhi Kashyap
Ridhi Kashyap is an associate professor of social demography and professorial fellow of Nuffield College at the University of Oxford. She completed her DPhil in Sociology jointly affiliated with the University of Oxford and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. Her research spans a number of substantive areas in demography and sociology, including gender, mortality and health, marriage and family, and ethnicity and migration. Her work has sought to adopt computational innovations both in terms of modelling approaches such as agent-based models and digital trace data from web and social media platforms to study social and demographic processes.
Website
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Charles Rahal
Charles is a social science methodologist and applied social data scientist with a background in high-dimensional econometrics, having completed his PhD in 2016. He is particularly interested in unique data origination processes, be they unstructured or otherwise, and is an advocate for open source and reproducible academic research. He presently teaches 'Python for Sociologists' and 'Replication', both in Michaelmas term, although he has also recently given workshops and guest lectures on the themes of 'An Introduction to Machine Learning' and 'An Introduction to the Command Line'.
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Chris Barrie
Christopher Barrie is a political sociologist of protest and conflict, specializing in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). He currently holds the position of Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. He is particularly interested in combining qualitative field-based methods with computational techniques.
Website
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Tobias Rüttenauer
Tobias Rüttenauer is a Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. His research focuses on environmental inequality, selective migration trajectories, and spatial demography. Furthermore, he is interested in quantitative spatial methods, longitudinal regression models, and the use of geographical information systems to connect different sources of administrative data.
Website
To be announced.

To be announced.

To be announced.

Konstanz

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Karsten Donnay
Karsten Donnay is Assistant Professor of Computational Social Science in the Department of Politics and Public Administration of the University of Konstanz. He is the designated lecturer for the SEDS data science master degree and a member of the Konstanz Center for Data and Methods. His current research examines political behavior on digital media and how this affects societal decision-making using tools from the field of computational social science. He also works on a range of methodological questions related to digital trace data and the use of novel highly-resolved spatiotemporal data in the social sciences.
Website
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Carsten Schwemmer
Carsten Schwemmer is senior research associate at University of Princeton, Center for Information Technology Policy. His work focuses on the application of computational methods for social science research. He is particularly interested in the study of ethnic minorities, social media communication, natural language and image processing as well as software development. He co-organized a partner site for the Summer Institute in Computational Social Science in Bamberg and taught courses on methods of political sociology and computational social science at University of Bamberg, University of Konstanz and Humboldt University of Berlin.
Website
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Peter Selb
Peter Selb is professor of survey research at the University of Konstanz, Germany, where he directs the interdisciplinary Master's program in Social and Economic Data Science (SEDS). Prior to this position, he was coordinator of the Swiss National Election Study at the University of Zurich and assistant professor of research methodology in Konstanz. His research covers topics in political behavior and public opinion. He regularly teaches classes in survey methodology, causal inference, and statistical modeling.
Website
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Susumu Shikano
Susumu Shikano is Professor of Political Methodology at University of Konstanz. He is doing research on spatial models of politics and diverse topics in political behavior. Before coming to Konstanz, he was professor ad interim at the University of Potsdam (2008) and assistant professor at the University of Mannheim (2001-2008). He received a Dr. phil (2001) and venia legendi (2007) for political science from the University of Mannheim. Since 2012 he has been the instructor of the courses ‘Bayesian statistics’ at the ECPR Summer/Winter School in Methods and Techniques. In 2020, he will teach ‘maximum likelihood estimation’ at the Essex Summer School in Social Science Data Analysis.
Website


Image of Franziska Weeber
Franziska Weeber
Franziska is currently pursuing her MSc in Social and Economic Data Science at the University of Konstanz. She is interested in the application of computational methods for data retrieval and exploratory analysis as well as the impact of digital technology on social inequality and culture. She has experience in working as a teaching assistant for statistics, quantitative methods and applied data analysis. Moreover, she participated at SICSS 2019 in Bamberg.
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Philipp Bosch
Philipp Bosch is currently pursuing a Master's degree in Social and Economic Data Science at the University Konstanz. Previously he finished his Bachelor in Politics and Administration at the University Konstanz. Philipp is particularly interested in research concerning political behavior and public opinion with a focus on the formation of radical attitudes. In the past he gained teaching experience in undergrad courses for statistics and empirical research methods.
Jana Schwarz
Jana is currently studying an MA in Politics and Public Administration with a specialization in International Administration and Conflict Management at the University of Konstanz. During her bachelor’s degree she developed a growing interest in international relations and global governance issues and wrote her thesis on the impact of immigration on right-wing populist voting behavior and if migration does explain the rise of the AfD in Germany. Apart from that she has gained working experience as a student teacher in statistics and management aswell as vice president of the student’s union.
Image of Rahkakavee Baskaran
Rahkakavee Baskaran
Rahkakavee Baskaran is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Politics and Public Administration at the University of Konstanz. She is particularly interested in comparative politics, as well as empirical and statistical analysis, especially with regard to electoral research. In the past Rahkakavee gained considerable teaching experience in statistic and methods working as a tutor for these subjects.

Tucson

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Thomas Davidson
Thomas Davidson is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Cornell University. In fall 2020 he will be an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University. He studies political discussions, hate speech, and other topics using digital trace data. His research involves a number of different computational methods including machine learning, natural language processing, and social network analysis.
Website
Image of Yotam Shmargad
Yotam Shmargad
Yotam Shmargad is an Assistant Professor in the School of Government & Public Policy at the University of Arizona. His research focuses on understanding how social media platforms shape political life in the United States. He uses a mix of statistical and computational methods, including social network analysis, online data collection, virtual experimentation, sentiment analysis, and machine learning.
Website



Rutgers

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Image of Katherine McCabe
Katherine McCabe
Katie is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University. Her research interests include public opinion, social identity, and political psychology.
Image of Hana Shepherd
Hana Shepherd
Hana is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University. Her research focuses on social networks, social norms, and group cultures.
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Kira Sanbonmatsu
Kira is Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University and Senior Scholar at the Center for American Women and Politics at the Eagleton Institute of Politics. Her research interests include gender, race/ethnicity, parties, public opinion, and state politics.
Image of Thomas Davidson
Thomas Davidson
Thomas Davidson is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Cornell University. In fall 2020 he will be an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University. He studies political discussions, hate speech, and other topics using digital trace data.
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Daniel Hopkins
Daniel Hopkins is Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Michael Kenwick
Michael Kenwick is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University.
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Yanna Krupnikov
Yanna Krupnikov is Associate Professor of Political Science at Stony Brook University.
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Katherine Ognyanova
Katherine Ognyanova is an Assistant Professor at the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University.
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Adam Thal
Adam Thal is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University.
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Andrey Tomashevskiy
Andrey Tomashevskiy is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University.
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Simone Zhang
Simone Zhang is a PhD student in Sociology at Princeton University interested in social stratification, organizations, and how social policy is implemented on the ground.
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More to be added soon ...


Image of Kathleen Rogers
Kathleen Rogers
Kathleen is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at Rutgers University. Her research integrates work on symbolic representation from the field of women and politics with scholarship on emotions and social identities from political psychology.

Chicago

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Joshua Becker
Joshua Becker is a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer at Kellogg School of Management and a researcher in residence at the Northwestern Institute for Complex Systems. Joshua will be starting on faculty somewhere awesome in Fall 2020, TBA. They use agent-based models and online laboratory methods to study collective intelligence and group decision-making. Joshua's current reserach focuses on how social influence in networks can improve or undermine factual belief accuracy.
Website
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Kat Albrecht
Kat Albrecht is a Law and Sciences Fellow in sociology and the Pritzker School of Law at Northwestern University. She is also a member of Luis Amaral’s Complex Systems Lab in the McCormick School of Engineering. Kat’s work sits at the intersection of computational social science and law, where she uses innovative computational techniques to study school gun violence, felony murder, Title IX policy, and racial disparity in arrest. Her work has been published in outlets like Nature Human Behavior, Law and Policy, and Studies in Law, Politics, and Society. Kat is also pleased to be an a research affiliate of the Duke University Center for Firearms Law in 2020.
Website
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Andrew Thompson
Andrew Thompson is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research interests span public opinion, causal inference, climate change, and immigration. His current work explores how demographic changes affect political attitudes and policy opinion using experimental and computational methods. In 2021, Andrew will start at George Washington as Assistant Professor within the Department of Political Science. Andrew holds a BA in Political Science and Philosophy from Marquette University.
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Remote Live Stream
Matt Salganik, Chris Bail, Dan Ariely, Zeynep Tufeckci, Elizabeth Bruch
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Sheena Erete
Sheena is an assistant professor in the College of Computing and Digital Media at DePaul University in Chicago, IL. Sheena co-directs the Technology for Social Good | Research and Design Lab with Dr. Denise Nacu.
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James Evans
James Evans is a Professor at the University of Chicago and External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. Professor Evans is the Director of the Knowledge Lab and the founder and director of the Computational Social Science program at the University of Chicago.

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Henry Dambanemuya
Henry Dambanemuya is a Ph.D. student in Technology and Social Behavior, a joint program in computer science and communications at Northwestern University. His doctoral research, supervised by Ágnes Horvát, advances complex network analysis and machine learning methods to better understand the structure and dynamics of social processes and has been published in Mary Ann Liebert’s Big Data journal as well as the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute for Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE) proceedings.
Website

Maastricht

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Monika Leszczyńska
Monika Leszczyńska is Assistant Professor of Empirical Legal Research at the Maastricht University Faculty of Law, Netherlands. She received her PhD in law from University of Bonn (Germany). In her research, she uses laboratory and online experiments as well as content analysis to deliver evidence-based insights to legal decision-makers on the impact of law on human behavior. Among others, she has researched how gender quotas influence group cooperation. She also studies how individuals make decisions in the online environment, i.e., how zero-price offers affect people’s decisions about their contractual rights and privacy. This research project has been funded by a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship.
Website
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Catalina Goanta
Catalina is Assistant Professor in Private Law at Maastricht University and co-manager of the Maastricht Law and Tech Lab. Her current research addresses decentralization and Internet governance, with projects such as the regulation of social media influencers, where she looks at monetization and content moderation on social media. During February 2018 - February 2019, Catalina was a Niels Stensen fellow and visited the University of St. Gallen (The Institute of Work and Employment) and Harvard University (The Berkman Center for Internet and Society). Catalina is also a non-residential fellow of the Stanford Transatlantic Technology Law Forum, and was a visiting researcher at the Stanford Law School during September 2017.
Website


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Bogdan Covrig
Bogdan Covrig is a Research Assistant at the Maastricht Law&Tech Lab (Maastricht University). He is currently following a computer science bachelor degree (Saxion University), which contributes to the interdisciplinary research conducted at the Lab. He is passionate about building infrastructures that support the development of digital legal frameworks. His research interests include human computer interaction (HCI) from the perspective of user behavior and consumer protection. In particular, his current projects focus on social media consumer profiling and influencing, as well as the impact of recommender systems on the commercial activities of influencers/content creators.

Duke University

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Chris Bail
Chris Bail is Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University where he directs the Polarization Lab. He is also affiliated with the Interdisciplinary Data Science Program, the Duke Network Analysis Center, and the Duke Population Research Institute. His research examines political polarization, culture and social psychology using tools from the field of computational social science. He is the author of Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream.
Website
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Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and he is affiliated with several of Princeton's interdisciplinary research centers: the Office for Population Research, the Center for Information Technology Policy, the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research interests include social networks and computational social science. He is the author of Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.
Website
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Dan Ariely
Dan Ariely is the James B. Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University and a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight. His studies decision-making and behavioral economics with applications to financial decisions, health and many other issues.
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Zeynep Tufekci
Zeynep Tufeckci is an Associate Professor at the UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and a regular contributor to the New York Times Op-Ed section. Her academic work focuses on social movements and civics, privacy and surveillance, and social interaction.
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Elizabeth Bruch
Elizabeth Bruch is an Associate Professor in Sociology and Complex Systems at the University of Michigan, and an External Faculty Member at the Santa Fe Institute. She leads the Computational Social Science Initiative at the University of Michigan, and her research focuses on the quantitative study of human behavior, with applications to online dating and residential preferences.
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Aidan Combs
Aidan is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at Duke University.
Website

UCLA

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Alina Arseniev-Koehler
Alina Arseniev-Koehler is currently a graduate student at the University of California Los Angeles pursuing a PhD in Sociology. Substantively, her research interests include culture, cognitive sociology, language, and health and illness. Methodologically, she is interested in computational social science and machine-learning, with a focus on the computational analysis of language. Her Master’s research aimed to provide a cognitively plausible, computational account of the schemata activated by news reporting on obesity. Alina also enjoys learning and teaching new computational techniques and helps coordinate the Computational Sociology Working Group at UCLA.
Website
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Jennie E. Brand
Jennie E. Brand is Professor of Sociology and Statistics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is Director of the California Center for Population Research (CCPR) and Co-Director of the Center for Social Statistics (CSS) at UCLA. She is Chair-Elect of the Methodology Section of the American Sociological Association (ASA) and an elected Board Member of the International Sociological Association (ISA) Research Committte on Social Stratification and Mobility (RC28). Prof. Brand is a member of the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey (GSS) and a member of the Technical Review Committee for the National Longitudinal Surveys Program at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. She received the ASA Methodology Leo Goodman Mid-Career Award in 2016, and honorable mention for the ASA Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility William Julius Wilson Mid-Career Award in 2014. Prof. Brand studies social stratification and inequality, mobility, social demography, education, and methods for causal inference.
Website
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Pablo Geraldo Bastías
Pablo Geraldo Bastías is a graduate student at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) affiliated to the California Center for Population Research (CCPR). His research examines how institutions influence inequality in education and the labor market, with a particular focus on skill formation systems and school-to-work transitions. He is interested in the intersection of causality, machine learning, and network analysis.
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Bernard Koch
Bernard is a sociology graduate student at UCLA. He developed research interests in culture, science, and computational methods through previous experiences in comparative genomics/bioinformatics and science education research. His master's thesis adapted models from macroevolutionary biology to explain the historical trajectories of cultural populations like music genres, scientific fields, and industries. For his dissertation, he'd like to focus on how deep learning can be applied to network and causal inference problems to help identify how we can make science more efficient, productive, and equitable. Bernard is passionate about collaborative science and teaching, and has given workshops on programming, machine learning, and/or computational social science for the National Human Genome Research Institute (NIH), the UCLA Library, and the UCLA Sociology Department.
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Michael Tzen

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Montreal

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Vissého Adjiwanou
Vissého Adjiwanou is a professor of Demography and quantitative and computational methods in the department of Sociology at the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). He is affiliate with the Centre on Population Dynamics (McGill University), and the department of Demography (Université de Montréal). Previously, he has served as Senior Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He received a M.A in Statistics from the National School of Statistics and Applied Economics (ENSEA-Cote d’Ivoire), a M.A in Economics of Development at the Centre for Studies and Research on International Development (CERDI- France) and a Ph.D in Demography from the Université de Montréal (Canada). His research focusses in population issues in sub-Saharan Africa and in Canada, including fertility, family dynamics, gender inequality, reproductive health, and migration. Vissého is the organizer of the first two Summer Institute in Computational Social Science at the University of Cape Town (South Africa).
Website
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Julie Hussin
Dr. Hussin is an early career Principal Investigator at the Montreal Heart Institute since January 2017 and Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine of the Faculty of Medicine at Université de Montréal. She is an active member of the Institute for Data Valorization (IVADO) funded by Canada First Excellence Funds. She has extensive expertise in computational biology, statistics, molecular evolution and human genetics. In particular, she is an expert in population genetics and has worked on natural selection and population demography in the founding population of Quebec, deepening our understanding of the French-Canadians’ genetic make-up. Her bioinformatics team have significant experience in handling and integrating large datasets and in developing computational tools, including Bayesian methods and machine learning approaches in genomics.
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Monica Alexander
Monica Alexander is an Assistant Professor in Statistical Sciences and Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on developing statistical methods to help measure demographic and health outcomes. She received a PhD in Demography and Masters in Statistics from the University of California, Berkeley. She has worked on research projects with organizations such as UNICEF, the World Health Organization, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Human Mortality Database.
Website
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William L. Hamilton
William L. Hamilton is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at McGill University, a member of the Mila AI Institute of Quebec, and a Canada CIFAR Chair in AI. His research focuses on graph representation learning, as well as applications in computational social science and biology. William's doctoral thesis -Representation Learning Methods for Computational Social Science- received the 2018 Arthur L. Samuel Thesis Award for the best thesis in the Computer Science department at Stanford University. He also received the 2017 Cozzarelli Best Paper Award from PNAS for his work studying police-community interactions using machine learning. His work has been featured on the BBC, Wired, and in the New York Times.
Website
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Richard Landers
Richard N. Landers is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Minnesota and holds the John P. Campbell Distinguished Professorship of Industrial-Organizational Psychology. His research concerns innovative technologies in psychometric assessment, employee selection, adult learning, and research methods, focusing recently on game-based assessment, gamification, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality. His work has been published in Journal of Applied Psychology, Computers in Human Behavior, and Psychological Methods, among others, and his work has been featured in popular outlets such as Forbes, Business Insider, and Popular Science. He is also a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.
Website


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Robert Djogbenou
Robert Djogbenou is a PhD candidate in the department of Demography at Université de Montréal. His research interests include reproductive health in sub-Saharan Africa and family dynamics, integration of immigrants, migration in Canada. In the realm of computational methods, he is particularly interested in machine learning techniques and the use of social media data.
Website

Paris

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Mathieu Ferry
Mathieu Ferry is a PhD Candidate at the Observatoire Sociologique du Changement (Sciences Po) and affiliated to CREST. Since the fall of 2017, he has been working on the social stratification of food practices in India, using both quantitative and qualitative data sources.
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Maël Ginsburger
Maël Ginsburger is a PhD Candidate at the Observatoire Sociologique du Changement (Sciences Po) and affiliated to CREST. Since 2018, he has been studying the evolution and the social structure of French households' environmental practices since the 1980’s, relying on both quantitative and qualitative data.
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Julien Migozzi
Julien Migozzi is a PhD Candidate in economic and urban geography, and a Lecturer at the Ecole Normale Supérieure. He uses qualitative and quantitative methods to analyse the digitalization and financialization of housing markets, focusing on South Africa and mixing digital with administrative data.
Website
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Etienne Ollion
Étienne Ollion is a CNRS research fellow and an Associate Professor in Sociology at l’École Polytechnique. His research focuses on politics, and he integrates digital data to more classic data sources and methods.
Website
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Jean-Philippe Cointet
Jean-Philippe Cointet is a Researcher at Sciences Po Médialab where he works on the development of innovative computational sociology methods. He participated in various quali-quantitative research projects including social media analysis (Facebook, public comments), science dynamics (oncology collective thoughts (CIHR project), synthetic biology emergence), political processes (political discourses, climate change negotiations). He also designs the CorText platform.
Website
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Salomé Do
Salomé Do is a PhD Candidate at LATTICE (Ecole Normale Supérieure) and Médialab (Sciences Po). She works on natural language processing and its applications to social sciences. She graduated from ENSAE, specializing in machine and deep learning.
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Guillaume Hollard
Guillaume Hollard is an Associate Professor at Ecole Polytechnique. His work focuses on public and individual decision making.
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Thomas Louail
Thomas Louail is a Research Fellow at the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and a member of UMR Géographie-cités based in Paris. He holds a PhD in Computer Science and worked at the Institut de Physique Théorique [CEA] & at the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems (IFISC) in Palma. His research focuses on analysing large-scale individual data to measure, model and develop - hopefully - a better understanding of social dynamics.
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Ivaylo Petev
Ivaylo Petev is a CNRS Research Fellow and a Professor of Sociology at ENSAE.
Website
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Paula Tubaro
Paola Tubaro is an associate research professor at the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). Her work focuses on facilitating inter-disciplinary dialogue to leverage today's growing capacity to collect and analyze data at both small and large scale and to model complex systems, to reveal yet-unknown patterns of individual and group behaviors. She teaches teach the sociology of social networks at ENS-EHESS, and social and economic network science at ENSAE.
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Sander Wagner
Sander Wagner is an Assistant Professor at the Laboratoire de Sociologie Quantitative (LSQ) at CREST-ENSAE.
Website
More to be added soon ...


Copenhagen

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Friedolin Merhout
Friedolin Merhout is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and an affiliate of the Centre for Social Data Science at the University of Copenhagen. He uses computational and experimental methods to examine intergroup relations such as between immigrants and natives, political partisans, or religious groups. His research leverages digital trace, text, survey, and administrative data to generate novel insights about established social scientific puzzles.
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Anne Helby Petersen
Anne Helby Petersen is a Ph.D. student at the Section of Biostatistics at the University of Copenhagen. Her Ph.D. project aims to develop new statistical methods for integrating data driven machine learning methods with dynamic life course analysis. She is the primary developer of two R-packages on CRAN, dataMaid and PCADSC.
Website
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Hjalmar Bang Carlsen
Hjalmar Bang Carlsen is a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Social Data Science at the University of Copenhagen. He works at the intersection of social data science, political sociology and pragmatism. He is currently working on two main projects focusing on 1) activists patterns of engagement, and 2) methodological issues within quantitative and qualitative text analysis, and especially their combination.
Website



NYU

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Carly Knight
Carly Knight is an Assistant Professor in the Sociology department at NYU. She recieved her PhD from Harvard University. Her work applies quantitative and computational methods to questions of historical and cultural change. Her primary research interest concerns the evolution of attitudes towards the market and the development of organizational market actors. She is also broadly interested in political sociology, law and regulation, markets and moral classification, and computational analysis. In the Fall, she will begin as an Assistant Professor at New York University.
Website
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Taylor Brown
Though based in NYC, Taylor Brown is a doctoral candidate in the Duke Sociology department, with association at the Duke Network Analysis Center. She has broad interests in computational methods and social media studies. Her dissertation explores gender inequality in creative professions. Taylor holds an MA in sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill and an MSc in evidence-based social intervention from the University of Oxford. Prior to beginning her PhD, Taylor fulfilled an appointment at the National Science Foundation in the division of Social and Economic Sciences.
Website
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Di Zhou
Di Zhou is a doctoral student in the Sociology department at NYU. She is interested in political sociology and computational methods. She holds an MA in Social Sciences from UChicago. Her master thesis explored the formation of the pro-Trump discourse in a Chinese online forum during the 2016 general election using computational text analysis combined with in-depth interviews.
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Tara Hoey
Tara Hoey is NYU's Department Manager and is the Financial Administer for SICSS-NYU.

Stellenbosch

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Image of Richard Barnett
Richard Barnett
Richard is a lecturer in the Department of Information Science at Stellenbosch University. He is a co-founder of the Computational Social Science Group at SU and is the group's resident Computer Scientist. His current research focus is on deep learning on graphs.
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Douglas Parry
Dr Parry is a lecturer in the Department of Information Science at Stellenbosch University. He is a co-founder of the Cognition and Technology Research group and his research concerns the interplay between digital technologies, human cognition, behaviour, performance, and affective well-being across a variety of life-situations.
Website
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Aldu Cornelissen
Dr Aldu Cornelissen is a data scientist at Kantar. He is a specialist in Social Network Analysis and is a co-founder of the Computational Social Science Group at Stellenbosch University.
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Kyle Finlay
Kyle runs an international data science team for a large market research firm. His team focuses on R&D, including in areas such as networks and NLP. In his spare time, he maintains a blog that applies a computational social science lens to understanding South African politics on social media.
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Schalk Visagie
Schalk Visagie is a data scientist with the Kantar Group's Global Innovations Team based in Cape Town, South Africa, where he works on natural language processing. He completed his graduate studies at Stellenbosch University where his research primarily focused on minimum wage legislation and its relation to subjective well-being in South African labour markets. He is currently studying Mathematics at the LSE.

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Petrus Schoonwinkel
Petrus Schoonwinkel is a postgraduate Socio-Informatics student at Stellenbosch University. He is also affiliated with the Computational Social Science Group at the Department of Information Science. His research examines automated account classification, characterisation of networks on Twitter and social network analysis in general using tools from the field of computational social science. He's written and presented several papers on bot detection and classification, and is currently in the second year of his Master's thesis on characterisation of networks with minimal domain knowledge.

Tokyo

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Hirokazu Shirado
Hirokazu Shirado is Assistant Professor of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his doctorate in Sociology at Yale University, where he was a member of the Yale Institute for Network Science. His reseach interests include social networks and computational social science. He is particularly committed to the experimental study of cooperative behaviors as they manifest through interactions between people located within social networks.
Website
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Makiko Nakamuro
Makiko Nakamuro is Professor of Policy Management at Keio University. She is an economist who has focused on economics of education. Makiko graduated from Keio University, Faculty of Environmental Information (SFC) in 1998, and then completed Masters and Ph.D. programs at Columbia University in the city of New York (in 2005 and 2010, respectively). She used to work for the Bank of Japan and the World Bank where she was given considerable hand-on training on economic research. She also worked for Tohoku University as an Assistant Professor, particularly working on the project of international migration.
Website


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Hirotake Ito
Hirotake Ito is a Researcher of Policy Management and a Ph.D. student at Keio University. He completed a master's course in economics at Hitotsubashi University. He has experience working for an asset management company and a data analysis company.

2019


Hunter College

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Maria Y. Rodriguez
is an Assistant Professor at the Silberman School of Social Work, part of the City University of New York’s Hunter College. She is a faculty affiliate at the CUNY Institute for Demographic Research (CIDR), and graduate faculty at the CUNY Grad Center. Her research interests intersect demography, computational social science, housing policy and social welfare. Currently, she has two active areas of research: (1) understanding the impacts of algorithmic decision-making in human services (with particular attention to racially marginalized groups), and (2) using Twitter data to understand the lived experience of marginalized communities in the United States. She can be found on Twitter [@HousingTheCity](https://twitter.com/HousingTheCity).
Website
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Josh Raines
Josh Raines is the Assistant Director of the Social Science Research Center at Ball State University. He has conducted practical and community-based research in local, state, national, and international settings for more than 20 years. Currently, he has designed a virtual reality (VR) simulation program that introduces/reinforces practice skills for social work students and human service trainees. Additionally, the simulation software collects research data by compiling various behavioral-level indicators from users. His current research examines the role of client race and implicit associations on users’ assessments of risk and protective factors during virtual home visit activities.
Website
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Desmond Patton
Desmond Upton Patton is a Public Interest Technologist who is a pioneer in the use of social media and artificial intelligence in the study of gun violence and coined the term Internet Banging. Dr. Patton is the founding Director of the SAFElab and Associate Professor of Social Work, Sociology and Data Science at Columbia University. He is the recipient of the 2018 Deborah K. Padgett Early Career Achievement Award from the Society for Social Work Research (SSWR) and 2017-2018 Fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. He is a Presidential Leadership Scholar and Technology and Human Rights Fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights at Harvard Kennedy School. His worked is featured in the A&E show: Secret Life of a Gang Girl: The Untold Story. Dr. Patton studies the ways in which gang involved youth conceptualize threats on social media, and the extent to which social media shapes and facilitates youth and gang violence. In partnership with the Data Science Institute, he is developing an online tool for detecting aggression in social media posts. Dr. Patton’s research on “internet banging” has been featured in the New York Times,Chicago Tribune, USA Today, NPR, Boston Magazine, ABC News, and Vice. It was cited in an Amici Curae Brief submitted to the United States Supreme Court in Elonis v. United States, which examined the interpretation of threats on social media.
Website
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Melanie Sage
Melanie Sage, PhD, MSW, is an Assistant Professor at the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. She is a co-chair of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare’s Grand Challenge: Harnessing Technology for Social Good. She chairs the international Human Services Information Technology Association (husita.org), a non-profit organization which oversees the publication Journal of Technology and Human Services. Her research is focused at the intersection of technology and child welfare, and she is especially interested in how technology can be leveraged to support positive outcomes for foster youth.
Website
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Lauri Goldkind
Lauri Goldkind, PhD, MSW, is an Associate Professor at Fordham University's graduate School of Social Service. Dr. Goldkind has a longstanding interest and practice background in nonprofit leadership, capacity building, and organizational development. At Fordham she teaches across the foundation and advanced years. Her practice experience has been centered in the youth development, education, and juvenile justice realms. Prior to joining the faculty, she served as the Director of New School Development and the Director of Evaluation at The Urban Assembly (UA), a network of new specialized public schools located in the Brooklyn, the Bronx and Manhattan. At UA she supported principals through the new school process, helping them earn start-up grants valued at over $500,000 per school; additionally, she provided technical assistance to principals and school-based staff on data-driven decision making, development and maintenance of data management structures and the effective use of data to improve student achievement. She has had the privilege of working with youth in NYC at organizations such as CASES, the Posse Foundation and the DOME Project.
Website
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Richard Smith
Richard Smith has been using computational social science methods for over a decade to study sustainable community development, poverty, inequality, and migration. He is an experienced R user and also has advanced training in Geographic Information Systems with a little bit of exposure to Python. He has experience with the following methods: HLM, spatial regression, spatial filtering with eigenvectors, sequence analyses, Bayesian model averaging, quasi-experimental design with matching using machine learning, survival analysis, longitudinal data analysis, and count data models. He has published research on technology in human services, age friendly communities, ecocity mapping, neighborhood change and gentrification. He is currently part of a multidisciplinary, tri-campus, 4 year, $1.5 million National Science Foundation project that will investigate communication between water and health systems about water disruptions and how they engage the community to promote resilience.
Website
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Angelo Cabrera
Angelo Cabrera is the Founder and a Board of Director of Masa-MexEd Inc. and Founding Board Member of the American Dream Charter School in the South Bronx. He has an extensive track record creating and promoting educational programs for the recent immigrant community in New York City, as well as returning migrants to Mexico. He is currently managing a research project at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs-Baruch College.
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Anne Kou
Anne is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at New York University. Her research interests include inequality, race/ethnicity, gender, and social policy. She is working on collaborative projects examining the relationship between childhood experiences and socioeconomic attainment, and early childhood education in New York City.
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Carrie Hamilton
Carrie Hamilton is a program assistant for the Social Data Initiative at the Social Science Research Council. Prior to joining the SSRC, she worked as a research technician at the Center for the Study of Adolescent Risk and Resilience at Duke University. She graduated with highest honors from UNC Chapel Hill in 2017 with a BS in environmental science and geography. At UNC, she conducted independent research projects through the National Science Foundation and Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program and spent a year living and working in Ecuador through UNC’s Global Gap Year Fellowship.
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Daejun Park
Daejun Park is a Ph.D. candidate in social work at University at Albany. His research interests include alcohol and other drug use, as well as health disparities. He has served as a research assistant at UAlbany.
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Diane Yoong
Diane (they/them) is currently a graduate student in Critical Social/Personality and Environmental Psychology at the CUNY Graduate Center. Broadly, their work is on understanding the relationality between systems of oppression (e.g. racism, homo- or trans-phobia) and the individual. Outside of academia, they are busy with creating a digital webspace for queer Asians in North America (hopefully broader!), and exploring the binaries that seem to divide academic work production and creative work.
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Feng-Yi Liu
Feng-Yi Liu received his BA and MA degree in Social Welfare at National Chung Cheng University in Taiwan. He also completed a second MA at Columbia University in Mathematical Statistics. Now he is a Ph.D. candidate in the school of social work at Rutgers University, and a graduated statistician recognized by the American Statistics Association. His broad research interests include immigrant family and child development, American immigration policy, and American child care policy. His dissertation thesis focuses on how family instability and child welfare interventions might influence child development among low-income immigrant children.
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Friederike Windel
Friederike Windel is a PhD student in the Critical Social and Personality Psychology program at the CUNY Graduate Center. Her research focuses on how white Germans position themselves in relationship to Germans of color and people of color in Germany. She uses narrative research to explore positionality and currently examines how white German volunteers construct themselves in relationship to refugees.
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Hannah Szlyk
Hannah is currently a NIMH T32 postdoctoral research scholar at The Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. Hannah earned her doctoral degree in social work at the Steve Hicks School of Social Work at the University of Texas at Austin in May 2018. There, Hannah studied suicidality among minority and underserved youth. Her dissertation consisted of a mixed methods project that examined suicidal ideation, sexual and ethnic identity, external stressors, and academic progress among students attending a public alternative high school. Hannah is currently exploring the evidence base and implementation of technology-enhanced interventions for youth suicidality. She is specifically interested in understanding who uses text-based message hotlines to address suicidality and how these crisis interventions can be better adapted for hard-to-reach and minority youth populations. Hannah would also like to gain skills in computational science in order to analyze large-scale datasets and hotline conversations. Hannah enjoys practicing yoga, traveling, and spending time with her partner and their four cats.
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Jiyeon (Siyeona) Chang
Jiyeon (Siyeona) Chang is a student in Columbia’s PhD program in Sociology, where she studies the consequences of global economic inequality on cultural and artistic diversity. She is interested in how the dynamics of cultural production and consumption are shaped by inequality engendered by the structural transformation and globalization of economies, and what this tells us about how we construct cultural and artistic boundaries. She is also increasingly interested in how automation-induced changes in the labor market shape the meaning of work, and how we think about innovation and creativity. Prior to coming to Columbia, she worked as an economist and policy analyst on issues related to international trade and global value chains at the United Nations (FAO), Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the World Bank.
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Jon Phillips
Jon Phillips is a PhD student in the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. He is involved in mental health services research using health care databases as well as intervention research aiming to improve services for incarcerated individuals with mental illness.
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Kasey Zapatke
Kasey is a third-year doctoral student in Sociology at The Graduate Center (CUNY). He is broadly interested in urban inequality, and specifically focuses his research on housing inequality, residential segregation, affordable housing, neighborhood change, gentrification, and suburbanization. Kasey is working on developing a dissertation project that looks at how neighborhood patterns of inequality and residential segregation shape spatial patterns of neighborhood affordability for the middle class.
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Maya Godbole
Maya is going on her 5th year in the Basic and Applied Social Psychology PhD program at CUNY Graduate Center. Maya’s research focuses around understanding, and intervening against, factors that contribute to disparities in the representation and achievement of women in competitive contexts (e.g., leadership). She is particularly interested in using social psychological research to inform policy and practice within organizations—for example, her dissertation research investigates how sex discrimination policy can impact women’s perceptions of organizational climate, motivation, and achievement. In her free time, Maya likes running around Prospect Park, doing/attempting the NYTimes Crossword, and reading.
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Nga Than
Nga Than is a Ph.D student in the Sociology program at City University of New York – The Graduate Center. Her research interests are in entrepreneurship, work, immigration, and consumption. She is in the process of writing a dissertation proposal, focusing on how technological advancement changes work relations in contemporary work place. She was born and raised in Vietnam, then moved to the U.S. for higher education. She is fluent in Vietnamese, English, German, as well as conversant in Chinese.
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Pedro Rodriguez
Pedro Rodriguez Martinez is a Research Fellow at the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). His areas of interest include the evaluation of social programs within the developing world and the economics of gender violence, education and crime. Prior to joining the IDB he worked in Miami and Ecuador as a consultant performing statistical data analysis. He holds a BA in Political Economy and an MSc in Economics.
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Salar Khaleghzadegan
Salar Khaleghzadegan is pursuing a Master of Public Policy with a concentration in Health Policy at the University of Maryland Baltimore County and is a Research Coordinator at the Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. He is currently exploring research focused on understanding how to improve equitable access, quality, and outcomes of care with an emphasis on maintaining cost-effectiveness through high-value care. One of his current projects uses textual analysis to examine healthcare documents using NLP methods. Another project studies the linguistic and paralinguistic features of patient-provider communication to assess how these dynamic interactions drive outcomes (i.e. compliance with complex care regiments; patient experiences of respect, dignity, and satisfaction with care). This fall, he will be applying to doctoral programs in Health Policy and Management, where he hopes to focus on health services research while integrating emerging quantitative and computational methods such as machine learning, causal inference, and automated text analysis.
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Sapir Soker Elimaliah
Sapir Soker Elimaliah, is a doctoral student in the developmental psychology program at the City University of New York, College of Staten Island. Prior to their Ph.D studies, Sapir owned a clinic for Applied Behavior Analysis therapy and worked with toddlers with autism. Sapir's research interests focus on motor development in autism and specifically restricted and repetitive behaviors. Sapir is also interested in the physiological markers of restricted and repetitive behaviors in autism.
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Sarah Riley
Sarah Riley is a PhD student in information science at Cornell University, where she is focusing on bias in automated decision-making systems. She is interested in computational methods and policy interventions for identifying and mitigating bias. Sarah has a bachelor’s degree from Amherst College and a master’s in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley.
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Shashi Goel
Shashi Goel is specialized in Political Science and Women’s and Gender studies. She has done research in many areas in Political Sociology, International relations, Women’s studies and Human Rights, Migration. She is currently working as Honorary Fellow in the Center for Women and Gender studies at University of Wisconsin. Previously she has worked as visiting faculty at Qatar University.
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Tim Ittner
Tim Ittner is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. Before arriving at Columbia, he graduated from Brown University in May 2018 with an Sc.B. with Honors in Social Analysis & Research. Tim has a penchant for interdisciplinary work and using innovative data, methods, and designs in his research. His interests revolve around population geography, spatial demography, and inequality dynamics.
Image of Zoe Carey
Zoe Carey
Zoe Carey is a PhD Candidate in sociology at The New School for Social Research. She is interested in the impact of data-driven technologies on organizations and issues of expertise and accountability in algorithmic decision-making. Her dissertation addresses these questions in the field of policing. By tracing algorithmic assemblages from creation to implementation across private and public sectors, her project will map the social life of a predictive policing algorithm. Zoe has worked as a Teaching Fellow, Associate Editor, and Research Assistant at The New School, and she served on the SENS-UAW bargaining committee as the union of academic student workers negotiated their first contract with the university.
Image of Gleneara Bates-Pappas
Gleneara Bates-Pappas
Gleneara E. Bates-Pappas, LMSW, is currently working on her PhD at CUNY Graduate Center. Her doctoral research explores the environmental risk factors for lung cancer mortality among racially ethnic minorities living in New York. Her current research projects aim to elucidate the bio-physiological aspects of tumor resistance in response to chemotherapy and the use of telemedicine to improve quality-of-life and cognitive function in post-treatment cancer survivors, in addition to exploring ways to use virtual and augmented reality to reduce anxiety during treatment of oncology patients. She is currently an American Cancer Society doctoral fellow and CUNY Graduate Center Provost pre-dissertation fellow.
Image of Sebastian Hoyos-Torres
Sebastian Hoyos-Torres
Sebastian Hoyos-Torres is a Criminal Justice PhD student at the CUNY Graduate Center/John Jay College. He earned his Bachelor of Arts in Criminology at Le Moyne College in Syracuse NY. In his studies, he is particularly interested in the spread of data analytics within the criminal justice system. This includes examining the use of risk assessment tools within the criminal justice system and racial bias. Additionally, Sebastian is interested in looking at social movements on Twitter and how they are portrayed differently across different groups across the web.

RTI International

All Participants


Image of Antje Kirchner
Antje Kirchner
Antje Kirchner, PhD, is a Research Survey Methodologist at RTI International and an Adjunct Research Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Her research addresses challenges in survey methodology, including ways to examine nonresponse bias using machine learning techniques, adaptive/responsive designs, assessing the quality of survey and administrative data, and how to improve response quality in surveys using behavior coding and paradata. Her research has been published in journals such as Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology, and Journal of the American Statistical Association. She recently organized the “Big Data Meets Survey Science (BigSurv18)” conference.
Website
Image of Craig A. Hill
Craig A. Hill
Craig A. Hill, PhD, is the Senior Vice President for Survey, Computing, and Statistical Sciences division. He creates the strategy and vision for his business unit, and manages and directs a portfolio of more than 150 studies and more than 500 professional staff. Dr. Hill received his PhD in quantitative methods from the Political Science department at the University of New Orleans and has published in a variety of journals. He also was the lead editor for Social Media, Sociality, and Survey Research (Wiley, 2013). Recent presentations include “Thoughts, Ruminations, and Twitter-ready Soundbites on Data Science, Big Data, and Social Science Research” (2017 Royal Statistical Society) and “Moving Social Science into the Fourth Paradigm” at BigSurv18 in Barcelona.
Website
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Alan Blatecky
Alan Blatecky, PhD, is a Visiting Fellow at RTI International and has broad expertise in high performance computing, international networking, computational science, Artificial Intelligence and advanced cyberinfrastructure. As a Visiting Fellow, Alan focuses on integrating and deploying advanced technologies to transform research and education. Alan previously was the Director for the Office of Cyberinfrastructure (OCI) at the National Science Foundation, Deputy Director of the Renaissance Computing Institute, Executive Director of Research and Programs at the San Diego Supercomputing Center, and Vice President of Information Technology at MCNC and NCREN (North Carolina Research and Education Network). Alan recently co-authored a book; “Reproduciblity: A Primer on Semantics and Implications for Research.
Website
Image of Helen Jang
Helen Jang
Helen Jang, Senior Director at RTI International, leads Project Catapult, a company initiative focusing on applying computational social science and directs the Center for Digital Innovation in Education and Workforce Development division. Her work leverages data and emerging technologies to improve policy and practice. Pivotal work includes the National Center for Education Statistics’ [DataLab](https://nces.ed.gov/datalab/index.aspx), which offers public access to data from 50 federal studies, [USAID’s Early Grade Reading Barometer](https://earlygradereadingbarometer.org/), which offers a wealth of actionable assessment data to improve literacy outcomes, and the [Evaluation Engine](https://evaluationengine.org), a quasi-experimental impact evaluation tool designed to help states use their longitudinal education data to improve instruction.
Website
Image of Jacqueline Olich
Jacqueline Olich
Jacqueline Olich, PhD, is an administrator, educator and entrepreneur with experience building partnerships and developing innovative initiatives. She joined RTI International in 2014. As RTI’s first senior director of University Collaborations, she leads RTI International's University Collaboration Office (UCO), which serves as a catalyst and hub for outreach at the university level. She develops and manages partnerships with leading regional, national and international academic institutions. She leads the [RTI University Scholars Program](https://www.rti.org/rti-university-scholars-program) and the [RTI Internship Program](https://www.rti.org/internships). Dr. Olich is an adjunct associate professor in the [UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health’s](http://sph.unc.edu/) Public Health Leadership Program.
Website
Image of Sam S. Adams
Sam S. Adams
Sam Adams is a Senior Artificial Intelligence Researcher at RTI International and also the Mission Architect for Project Catapult, a company initiative focusing on applying computational social science. He applies artificial intelligence and knowledge graph techniques to the unique data curation and integration challenges that data scientists face. He holds 29 patents and previously spent more than 2 decades with IBM Research, where he was appointed one of the first IBM Distinguished Engineers. Mr. Adams played a leading role in various strategic initiatives—including artificial general intelligence, autonomous learning, end-user programming, contextual data fusion, big data and analytics, enterprise-scale data curation, and massive multicore programming and high-performance graph database acceleration; he also applied Internet of Things data and reactive knowledge graphs to the challenges of global elder care.
Website
Image of Rob Chew
Rob Chew
Rob Chew is a Research Data Scientist and Program Manager in RTI International's Center for Data Science. He uses his expertise in machine learning, software development, and computational social science to help subject matter experts solve their complex problems. Dedicated to interdisciplinary research, he has successfully integrated data science into projects spanning health care, criminal justice, public health, and the environment. In addition to [publishing](https://www.robchew.com/#publications), Mr. Chew has also developed open-source [analytical software packages](https://github.com/RTIInternational/rollmatch) and [applications](https://rtiinternational.github.io/SMART/). He was named a 2018 Data Fellow by the National Consortium for Data Science.
Website
Image of Kasey Jones
Kasey Jones
Kasey Jones is a Data Scientist with over four years of experience solving client problems using data analysis techniques in R and Python. He applies predictive modeling, simulation techniques, text analysis, and machine learning to produce impactful solutions. While at RTI, Mr. Jones has developed several modeling algorithms in conjunction with RTI's synthetic population. Projects include - predicting underage drinking rates in D.C., developing a social vulnerability index, and creating an agent-based model that calculates healthcare acquired infection rates for hospitals in North Carolina for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Website
Image of Georgiy Bobashev
Georgiy Bobashev
Georgiy Bobashev is an RTI Fellow in the Center for Data Science at RTI International with more than 20 years of experience in health research. His current research interests follow two major areas - predictive modeling and studies of substance use and risky behaviors. His models often combine mechanistic (e.g., agent-based and system dynamics) and machine learning techniques. Dr. Bobashev has applied modeling, statistical analysis and experimental design to a variety of health- and policy-related areas, including substance use, HIV, child/maternal health, influenza, cancer, diabetes, and violent behavior. He has been a principal investigator and co-investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
Website
Image of Ben Allaire
Ben Allaire
Mr. Allaire is a health economist in RTI International’s Public Health Economics Program. His research promotes understanding of the economic implications and burden of chronic disease, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, asthma, and HIV. He specializes in using econometric and simulation modeling techniques to identify the drivers of impact, costs, and cost-effectiveness in preventing and treating chronic disease.
Image of Kyle Chan
Kyle Chan
Kyle Chan is a PhD student in Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interest is multi-level governance and politics in Western Europe. Kyle looks at the implications of decentralization reforms to party politics, electoral politics and policy coordination across different levels of government. In particular, he is interested in how regionalist parties behave strategically after decentralization reforms. For example, he has an ongoing project that seeks to tease out the sources of regionalist party program variations on immigration in Western Europe. His research was published on Regional and Federal Studies. He obtained his research master's degree at Leiden University in the Netherlands, and completed his undergraduate studies at the Hong Kong Baptist University.
Image of Wei Chang
Wei Chang
Wei is a doctoral candidate in health policy at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on gender, household decision-making, and health in developing countries. With a background in economics, public health, and social work, she conducts cross-disciplinarily population research and evaluates interventions in maternal, sexual, and reproductive health. Her work aims to improve women’s agency through producing and synthesizing research evidence for policy decisions in low-resource settings.
Image of Mateo Villamizar Chaparro
Mateo Villamizar Chaparro
Mateo Villamizar Chaparro is PhD student in Political Science at Duke University. He holds a master’s degree in International Affairs (UCSD) and Political Science (Universidad de los Andes). His research focuses on the interactions between political economy, migration and violence with a regional focus on Latin America. He draws on methods as causal inference and experimental design. Mateo is also part of DevLab@Duke and the Duke/UNC Latin America Working Group.
Image of Michelle Corea
Michelle Corea
Michelle Corea is an incoming PhD student in the Political Science department at UNC Chapel Hill. Her research interests revolve around contentious politics and violence under authoritarian regimes. Methodologically, she is interested in a variety of computational approaches that include network and text analysis. Prior to graduate school, Michelle worked as a software developer at IBM and HCL Technologies. She received her BS in Mathematics from UNC Chapel Hill.
Image of Karishma D’souza
Karishma D’souza
Karishma is a PhD student in the Department of Health Policy and Management at UNC-Chapel Hill. She is interested in studying dual health markets - the simultaneous existence of private and public healthcare markets, and how the interplay of the two health markets influences health seeking behaviors in developing countries. Her current research focuses on the Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) telehealth market and its effect on primary healthcare markets in resource-constrained settings.
Image of Claire Chipman Gilliland
Claire Chipman Gilliland
Claire Chipman Gilliland is pursuing a PhD in Sociology at UNC-Chapel Hill. She studies how religious groups both combat and perpetuate inequality, focusing primarily on U.S. Christian institutions. She is developing computational text analysis methods to investigate sermons, or weekly religious messages, following important social and religious events for her dissertation. Claire holds a BA in Sociology and History from Furman University and an MA in Sociology from UNC-CH.
Image of Christopher Inkpen
Christopher Inkpen
Christopher Inkpen is a research sociologist and demographer in the Division for Applied Justice Research at RTI International. At RTI, Dr. Inkpen leads research and data collection for several projects focusing on criminal justice and security in Central America. His substantive research focuses on public opinion of the criminal justice system and justice issues as well as extracting narratives on the criminal justice system from massive text corpora. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Institute of International Education, and the Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.
Image of Molly Jacobs
Molly Jacobs
Molly M. Jacobs is an Assistant Professor at East Carolina University in Health Services and Information Management. She received her PhD from the George Washington University Department of Economics with a concentration in econometrics and labor economics. She holds a master’s degree in economics from George Washington University and degrees in economics and German from Duke University. She engaged in research grants from the US Department of Agriculture, Veterans Affairs and Commerce on a variety of topics including food stamps receipt, veterans’ disability rating, food security and patient activation measures. Dr. Jacobs served for four years as an agricultural economist for the USDA and was named a Fulbright Scholar to Berlin, Germany. Her research has focuses is on the design, implementation and evaluation of community health interventions targeting mental and physical well-being outcomes. She has extensive experience in collection and analysis of individual level health data examining the relationship between body perception and weight change as well as social and psychological influences on physical development.
Image of Sophie Kelmenson
Sophie Kelmenson
Sophie is a PhD Candidate in City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is interested in natural resource and food systems planning processes, and their interaction with economic development and equity considerations. She employs statistical and qualitative methods, as well as text and social network analysis in her research. She received her bachelor’s degree in government and legal studies from Bowdoin College, and a master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Image of Kelly Kilburn
Kelly Kilburn
Kelly Kilburn is a Research Scholar at the Duke Global Health Innovation Center. As a social and economic policy researcher she applies interdisciplinary quantitative techniques to analyze the causal impacts of development policies on health and human resources and their pathways of influence. Before joining Duke, Kelly was a postdoctoral scientist at George Washington’s School of Public Health and at UNC’s Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases. She holds a PhD in Public Policy and has years of experience working on experimental evaluations of social protection policies for poor and vulnerable populations across the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa.
Image of Eleftheria Kontou
Eleftheria Kontou
Eleftheria Kontou is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research interests lie in the fields of sustainable transportation planning and operations, emerging mobility, as well as transportation and energy sectors interdependencies. She is proposing new models and algorithms to improve sustainable mobility operations to serve communities in an equitable manner. She received her Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Florida and conducted research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Image of Elena Leonchuk
Elena Leonchuk
Elena Leonchuk is a postdoctoral research scholar at North Carolina State University, where she received her PhD in psychology. She specializes in research consulting and evaluation of science, technology and innovation programs and partnerships and their diverse stakeholders. Themes of her projects include R&D management, economic impacts, innovation process, and acquisition of social capital. Elena is the most passionate about bringing different sectors and disciplines together to solve current business and societal problems. She is a former division I varsity tennis player at Virginia Commonwealth University where she received her BS in political science.
Image of Chao Liu
Chao Liu
Chao is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at North Carolina State University. He is interested in computational social science, social network analysis, and organization. His current research explores the conditions under which work-based collaboration is possible in a virtual platform. Specifically, he investigates how network embeddedness within an online community affects individual contributions to team-based production using both numerical and textual data from the GitHub Community.
Image of Jiangmeng Liu (Helen)
Jiangmeng Liu (Helen)
Jiangmeng Liu (Helen) is an Assistant Professor of Strategic Communication in Communication Department at Seattle University. She received her Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Miami in 2017. Her research centers on individual and organizational use of social media, particularly regarding the influence of social media usage on individuals’ cognition, emotions, and behaviors.
Image of Zhifan Luo
Zhifan Luo
Zhifan Luo is a Ph.D. candidate of sociology at the University at Albany—State University of New York. Her research interests include political sociology, computational social science, elite politics, global hegemony, and political narrative. Her current project examines the role played by the political, the economic, and the military elites in shaping the China policy in the United States. She is also collaborating with colleagues on projects using big-data techniques to analyze political discourse on Chinese social media.
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Tim McDade
Tim McDade is a PhD student in the Political Science department at Duke University. His research employs quantitative methods to analyze democratic backsliding, the effects of bilateral financial flows on the state capacity and market structure of recipient countries, and countries’ decision-making processes during conflicts. His undergraduate degrees are in Mathematics (with Honors) and Chinese from the College of William & Mary. Prior to arriving at Duke, Tim worked for Microsoft Azure in Seattle and Beijing.
Image of Becca Merrill
Becca Merrill
Becca Merrill will be graduating this Spring with a PhD in Education from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has accepted a position as a researcher with Education Northwest, which currently houses the REL Northwest. Her work focuses on policy, leadership, and school improvement. Specifically, she employs qualitative and quantitative methods to study aspects of the teacher labor market. These include attracting quality teachers, hiring practices, teacher mobility and retention, teacher working conditions, and exit from the teacher work force.
Image of Samantha Mosier
Samantha Mosier
Samantha L. Mosier is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and a core faculty member of the Master of Public Administration program at East Carolina University. Her main fields of interest are public policy and public administration. Samantha’s research utilizes mixed methods to study the development and implementation of subnational environmental initiatives and sustainable food and agriculture policies. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from Colorado State University and her M.P.A. from Auburn University Montgomery.
Image of Ioanna Pavlidou
Ioanna Pavlidou
Ioanna Pavlidou is a PhD Student at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Her research interests include online social media and data analysis with special focus on online crowdfunding industry. Her current work explores how online crowdfunding platforms can help to bridge geographical, socioeconomic and cultural disparities in capital access. In her research, she experiments with computational social science, data mining and network graphs.
Image of Derek Ramirez
Derek Ramirez
Derek Ramirez is a data manager and social science researcher at RTI, International. His research interests include behavioral health, criminal justice, prevention science, wearables, machine learning, economics, and statistics. He is broadly interested in applying data science techniques and advanced quantitative methods in social research settings. Derek holds a BS in Applied Mathematics with a concentration in Computer Science and a Minor in Spanish from North Carolina State University and a MS in Applied Economics from East Carolina University.
Image of Nestor Ramirez
Nestor Ramirez
Nestor Alexis Ramirez is a Research Education Analyst at RTI International and a PhD candidate in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Nestor works on postsecondary student surveys including the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study and the Beginning Postsecondary Students Study, contributing to post-data collection activities such as variable derivation, data management, and publication tasks. His research agenda is broadly focused on college access for underrepresented students in the United States—his dissertation is focused on the role of geographic location and students’ willingness to relocate for college in the college decision-making process.
Image of Marwa Salem
Marwa Salem
Marwa Salem is a Senior Economist at RTI International. She received her PhD in Economics from North Carolina State University and in her dissertation, examined how household water consumption has responded to price and non-price demand side management policies. In her current position, she conducts quantitative analyses in different areas of environmental economics and management. She is interested in expanding the use of computational methods as complements to conventional econometric models in analyzing environmental policies and climate change impacts.
Image of Jonathan Schlosser
Jonathan Schlosser
Jonathan Schlosser is currently a PhD student in the School of Media and Journalism at UNC Chapel Hill, where he studies the effects of disinformation on the public’s perception of social and political issues. Current projects focus on the ways in which disinformation on social media can disrupt the process of learning, the development of beliefs/attitudes, and, consequently, political discourse in the public sphere. Jonathan is originally from Sullivan County, New York, but completed his MSc at Lancaster University and earned his BS from Binghamton University. He has worked in education, digital marketing, environmental science, broadcasting, and many other fields; these experiences have resulted in interdisciplinarity and multidimensionality being major factors in his work. He is excited for this opportunity and anticipates learning new things, meeting new people, and engaging with the SICSS community.
Image of Katherine Tait
Katherine Tait
Katherine Tait is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. Her research examines the interrelationship between economic conditions and social movements, particularly the politicization of work and use of direct action during times of high economic inequality. Her dissertation on the expanding worker cooperative sector in New York uses qualitative and computational methods to investigate how employees of democratic workplaces, advocacy organizations, and local institutions are coordinating their goals and efforts to create secure employment, and to inquire into what worker-ownership means to different actors in the NYC cooperative ecosystem.
Image of Eugene Uwiragiye
Eugene Uwiragiye
Eugene Uwiragiye is a PhD student at North Carolina A&T State University in Computational Science and Engineering. He is interested in medical images classification using deep learning (Convolutional Neural Networks, VGG16, VGG19, Resnet and Xceptions. He also works in Biostatistics (Post-Translational Modification of proteins) as Graduate Research Assistant. Eugene holds BS and MS in Operational Research and Stochastic Calculation from Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah in Morocco. He uses Python in different predictive models and machine learning.
Image of Felecia Vega
Felecia Vega
Ms. Felecia Vega is a researcher and intelligence analyst at the Laboratory for Analytic Sciences (LAS), a Department of Defense organization located on NC State’s Centennial Campus. The LAS is a collaborative effort between government, industry and academia, established to address the Intelligence Community (IC) analytic challenges. Ms. Vega is currently the technical lead for the LAS Computational Social Science & Triage team. The team is focused on innovation and deployment of new methods, techniques and tools for analyzing large volumes of quantitative and qualitative data. Ms. Vega’s research includes utilizing interdisciplinary methods to characterize and prioritize radicalized individuals along a “virtual spectrum” through triaging and machine learning algorithms. She has also pioneered a major framework to recognize and address an immediate IC need for developing Open Source tradecraft. Ms. Vega holds a Master’s of Science degree in Computer Science from Bowie State University and a Bachelors of Arts degree in Mathematics from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Ms. Vega lives in Raleigh, NC and enjoys watching football and spending time with family.
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Siri Warkentien
Siri Warkentien is a researcher in the Education and Workforce Development division of RTI International where she researches how family, school, and neighborhood contexts affect youth outcomes and evaluates educational programs for historically underserved youth. She received her PhD in Sociology and MA in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Johns Hopkins University where she focused on the causes and consequences of racial school and neighborhood segregation. Her research interests also include how information and networks influence families’ residential and school decisions.
Image of Tara Weatherholt
Tara Weatherholt
Tara Weatherholt, PhD, is an early childhood development researcher in the International Education Division of RTI International. Working primarily in low- and middle-income countries, she is responsible for designing and testing measures of child development and quality of learning environments, managing evaluation activities of RTI-supported pre-primary education programs, and leading large- and small-scale research studies, such as investigations into the factors related to education system efficiency in Uganda and the state of pre-primary education in Tanzania. Her research interests include cognitive development of children in disadvantaged environments, development of valid and reliable measures of learning for use in low-income contexts, and the use of data to inform quality early learning programming.
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Lawrence Whitley
Lawrence Whitley, Manager and Technology Lead in Clinical Research Informatics for RTI International, is expert in informatics and technology projects. His work on epidemiological research solutions includes surveys and longitudinal studies, collecting demographic, neurocognitive, clinical, biospecimen, medical history, family history, and genetic data. He serves as visionary, architect, lead developer and project manager for the implementation of a large custom software solution for mapping and harmonizing data across 70 cohorts for the ECHO Program, a large grant under NIH. He is focused on enhancing epidemiological and clinical research through machine learning, including deep learning with neural networks. He is very interested in how computational social science might augment that research. As a Technology Lead, he is uniquely positioned to help other staff expand their skills and experience in AI.
Image of Qinghua Yang
Qinghua Yang
Qinghua Yang is an Assistant Professor at the Bob Schieffer College of Communication, Texas Christian University. Her academic interests lie in health communication, new media, and quantitative research methods. She received her PhD in Communication from University of Miami and completed two-year postdoctoral research at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, where she focused on tobacco regulatory science, particularly on electronic cigarettes, and analyzing large datasets to answer otherwise unsolvable research questions. She is currently interested in leveraging computational methods to understand online social networks, retransmission of health information, and the dynamics of social support.
Image of Emily Hadley
Emily Hadley
Emily Hadley is a Data Scientist with the Center for Data Science at RTI International. She uses her technical skills on a variety of health, education, and computational social science projects. Emily has experience with machine learning techniques, natural language processing, predictive analytics, data visualization, and data ethics, as well as expertise programming in Python, R, and SQL. She holds a BS in Statistics with a second major in Public Policy from Duke University and a MS in Analytics from the Institute for Advanced Analytics at North Carolina State University.
Website
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Marcus Mann
Marcus Mann recently received his Ph.D. in sociology from Duke University and is an incoming Assistant Professor of Sociology at Purdue University. He studies science, politics, knowledge, and media using computational methods. His current research uses data from Twitter to examine how political media consumption patterns affect susceptibility to political disinformation. He also holds a BA in English from UMass - Amherst and MA's in religious studies and sociology from Duke University.
Website

Kadir Has University

All Participants


Image of Matti Nelimarkka
Matti Nelimarkka
Matti Nelimarkka is a researcher at the Department of Computer Science, Aalto University. He examines the intersections of political science and data science as well as political science and human-computer interaction. His current work focuses on racism in hybrid media systems, circulation of news, political polarization, agendas in political communication, power of algorithmic systems and politics in human-computer interaction.
Website
Image of Akın Ünver
Akın Ünver
Akin Ünver is an assistant professor of International Relations at Kadir Has University, specialising in conflict research, computational methods and digital crisis communication. He is the Resident Fellow of Cyber Research Program at the Centre for Economic and Foreign Policy Research (EDAM), a Research Associate at the Center for Technology and Global Affairs, Oxford University and a Senior Research Fellow at GUARD (Global Urban Analytics for Resilient Defence) at the Alan Turing Institute.
Website
Image of Güneş Aşık
Güneş Aşık
Güneş Aşık is an Assistant Professor of Economics at TOBB University of Economics and Technology in Ankara. She has an MPA in International Development from Harvard Kennedy School and she received her PhD from London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). She is a labour economist with research interests in employment and regional development. She works on a wide range of data intensive projects which include measuring stock of skills and the degree of mismatch in Turkish labour markets using large administrative data, exploring the impact of terrorism on female employment, evaluating the impact of employment subsidies in Turkey, estimating regional income per capita series for Turkish provinces covering the years between 1880 and 2010, and exploring how the mass minority movements at the beginning of twentieth century in Anatolia affected East-West development gaps.
Website
Image of Evgeniia Shahin
Evgeniia Shahin
Evgeniia Shahin is a PhD Candidate and a project assistant in the Department of International Relations, Bilkent University, Turkey. In her dissertation focusing on the effects of economic sanctions on targeted leaders’ attitudes she uses both qualitative and quantitative approaches, especially text analysis. Her interests include such areas of international relations as foreign policy analysis, international political economy and conflict studies. Evgeniia holds an MA in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from Sabancı University and a BA in Political Science and International Relations from Boğaziçi University.
Image of Safiya El Ghmari
Safiya El Ghmari
Safiya El Ghmari is currently a doctoral candidate at the National Institute of Territorial and Urban Planning in Rabat. In 2017, she was awarded the Excellence Research Grant from the National Center for Scientific Research and Technology (CNRST). She has a strong background in Architecture, Urban Planning and Design, and a passion for Computational Social Science. Safiya’s current research focuses on exploring and modelling the social dynamics in risk-prone informal urban areas in Morocco. Recently, she has learnt about a set of analytical tools combining both Model Thinking and Network Science that could help better grasp these dynamics in order to enhance life quality inside these settlements such as: Cellular Automata, and Agent-Based Models.
Image of Meltem Odabaş
Meltem Odabaş
Meltem Odabaş is a Ph.D. Candidate in the School of Sociology at the University of Arizona, and soon will join Indiana University-Bloomington as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Computational Social Science, affiliated with the Department of Sociology. Her current research examines how social embeddedness and communication in online settings influence collective action, behavior, perceptions, and decision-making in various settings, including economic markets, online communication platforms, and social movements. As such, her research sits at the intersection of economic and cultural sociology, and computational social science. Her future research at Indiana University will address the opioid crisis, including access to treatment, community-based risk-factors, drug-seeking behavior, overdose, and stigma. Meltem holds both Master of Arts and Bachelor of Arts degrees in Economics from Boğaziçi University.
Website
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Sercan Canbolat
Sercan Canbolat graduated summa cum laude from the Izmir University of Economics with BA degrees in International Relations and European Union and Economics (double major). He earned his MA degree in International Relations from Bilkent University with a full scholarship and graduated cum laude. Sercan's MA thesis focused on the political psychology of the Muslim Brotherhood’s political leaders. Sercan received the Fulbright scholarship to pursue his doctoral studies at the University of Connecticut. He studies and teaches International Relations and Comparative Politics with leadership and political psychology spins. Sercan writes his doctoral dissertation on patterns of Middle Eastern leaders’ learning to survive in the face of post-2011 Arab Uprisings. Sercan's doctoral dissertation and broader research agenda revolve around computational social science with a focus on automated text analysis, leadership and elite network analysis, and development of non-English text coding schemes such as Turkish and Arabic content analysis schemes and dictionaries. Sercan has published several scholarly works in notable peer-reviewed outlets including, Political Research Quarterly, Polity, and Perceptions.
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Doruk Tunaoğlu
Doruk Tunaoğlu is a Computer Scientist who is doing a Master's in Social Psychology at Boğaziçi University. He has a Master's degree from Computer Engineering of Middle East Technical University where he has studied motion learning for robotics. He is interested in using computational methods in social sciences, especially in psychology, and wants to develop better tools in this field. He thinks that there is a vast potential in analyzing the enormous online data as well as offline data such as books, movies and speeches.
Image of Aslı Ebru Şanlıtürk
Aslı Ebru Şanlıtürk
Ebru Şanlıtürk is a PhD student in Public Policy and Administration at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. Her area of research is migration policies and demography, with a special focus on the recent Syrian refugee crisis in the Mediterranean region. More specifically, she is interested in the digital traces and online social interactions of migrant populations as well as data visualization techniques to map internal and international migration flows. In this regard, her research interests frequently require the use of computational social science methods, especially for the collection and interpretation of online-generated data and for advanced data visualization.
Image of Didem Türkoğlu
Didem Türkoğlu
Didem Türkoğlu has just defended her PhD in sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and will join New York University – Abu Dhabi as a postdoctoral associate this fall. Her research interests lie in the intersection of political sociology, social movements, and studies on social inequalities. In her book project, she conducts a comparative analysis of higher education policies and the protests against tuition hikes over the last two decades in 34 OECD countries with a special focus on England, Germany, Turkey, and the United States. She has been interested in the computational methods within the context of analyzing the media coverage of social movements and the formation of political discourse through social media use. She is in the process of developing her next project, which analyzes the effectiveness of social movement alliances in influencing policy outcomes during significant transformations in the political structures. This study will also use a mixed methods approach that combines computational methods with qualitative comparative methods, and quantitative analysis of survey data. Before UNC, she received BA degrees in political science& international relations and history, as well as an MA degree in modern Turkish history, from Boğaziçi University.
Website
Image of Emil Smith
Emil Smith
Emil Smith is a PhD student in Educational Sociology at Aarhus University. He holds an MSc in social sciences in education science. His main research interest is the role of institutional contexts in the generation of social- and gender-inequality (e.g. classroom peer-effects and school culture). Methodologically Emil’s doctoral thesis will approach these issues through survey-based data and Danish register data as well as digital trace data from e-learning platforms and learning apps.
Website
Image of Melike Ayşe Kocacık
Melike Ayşe Kocacık
Melike is a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at Sabancı University. Her main fields of interests are foreign policy analysis and political violence along with quantitative methods. Her interest in computational social science is mostly on automated text analysis. In her thesis, she focuses on the third-party involvement in civil conflict examining via leader statements.
Image of Aycan Katıtaş
Aycan Katıtaş
Aycan Katıtaş is a Ph.D. candidate in International Relations at the University of Virginia. Her area of research is international political economy, with a specific focus on public opinion on trade and Foreign Direct Investment in the United States. Her dissertation investigates the conditions under which politicians choose anti-trade messages in their election campaigns and this strategy’s effects on public attitudes and behavior. She employs causal identification and text analysis techniques combined with large-scale quantitative analysis to trace the influence of candidates’ televised campaign advertising on voters’ trade preferences. She holds a double major BA in Political Science and International Relations and Business Administration from Boğaziçi University, and an MA in European Interdisciplinary Studies from College of Europe.
Website
Image of Dilara Kekulluoglu
Dilara Kekulluoglu
Dilara Kekulluoglu is a PhD student in School of Informatics at University of Edinburgh. Her research interests are privacy, computational social science and online social networks. Specifically, she is interested in privacy leaks that happen on online social networks. Currently she is focusing on collateral damage - information leak about you by your connections in a network, e.g. a friend celebrating your birthday online publicly. Dilara holds both BS and MS degree in Computer Engineering from Boğaziçi University. Her master’s thesis was about negotiation strategies for privacy in online social networks.
Website
Image of Mert Can Yılmaz
Mert Can Yılmaz
Mert Can Yılmaz is an MSSc student in the Department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University. Currently, he is working as a teaching assistant in a project called the Violence Early-Warning System (ViEWS). He is also the submission officer of a semi-academic journal called Pax et Bellum Journal which is published by the graduate students of his department. He is quite active in some of the civil society organizations formed by Turkish diaspora in Sweden and he is a board member at Turkiska Student- och Akademikerföreningen (Turkish Students and Academics Association). Additionally, he is one of the contributors in the Ankara-based independent fact-checking organization called teyit.org. He holds a BA in Political Science and International Relations from Boğaziçi University.
Image of Ali İhsan Akbaş
Ali İhsan Akbaş
Ali İhsan Akbaş is a second-year MS student in the program of Digital Media and Society at Uppsala University. He has received his BA degree from the department of Political Science and International Relations at Boğaziçi University. His studies, in a broader sense, aim to understand political opinion formation in fragmented informational contexts that are prevalent with the advent of the internet-based media. Specifically, he approaches polarization through the effects of misinformation and partisan news over opinion leaders within social networks. He is a motivated student about the emerging research methodologies in social sciences, both qualitative and quantitative, to advance in the studies of public opinion and political behavior.
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Hande Sodacı
Hande is a junior researcher who is interested in psychology of language. She recently worked in projects investigating the influence of culture and language on bilinguals’ speech and gesture, language change in third-generation immigrants, and second language tutoring using social robots. Hande's current research concerns the intersection of bilingualism, cross-language interactions, and language change. Her most recent work examined whether cognitive mechanisms of bilingualism have a role in the change observed in the Turkish spoken by the Dutch Turks. She would like to apply the computational methods and utilize the availability of mass data in her future projects for they can enormously contribute to this field of research. Hande holds a BA in Psychology with a minor in Linguistics as well as a research master's degree in Linguistics.
Image of Nezih Onur Kuru
Nezih Onur Kuru
Nezih Onur Kuru is a PhD candidate and research assistant at Political Science and International Relations department in Koç University. His current research focuses on political psychology, migration and political economy. Kuru is currently focused on his PhD thesis, titled as “How Do Emotions and Partisanship Influence the Relationship between Threat Perceptions and Refugee Hostility? The Case of Turkish Citizens and Syrian Refugees”. He obtained his B.A. degree from Galatasaray University in Political Science. Kuru completed his M.Sc in the department of Political Science and Public Administration in Middle East Technical University. In his master’s thesis, he analysed the relationship between social conservatism and voting behaviour through a comparison between the AKP and the CHP voters based on World Values Survey data.
Image of Şeyma Topçu
Şeyma Topçu
Şeyma is a masters student in Political Science department at Sabancı University. She holds a double major BA degree in Political Science and International Relations and History from Boğaziçi University. Her research interests are polarization and political behavior, along with the ways in which social media can be integrated in those fields through computational methods.
Image of Saloni Bhogale
Saloni Bhogale
Saloni Bhogale is a Research Fellow at the Trivedi Centre for Political Data at Ashoka University. She has pursued an inter-disciplinary MA in Liberal Studies with a concentration in Computer Science at Ashoka University. Her research applies computational methods to questions in the political science domain, particularly related to understand legislative behaviour in the Indian Parliament, through unpacking identities of parliamentarians by linking them to substantive concerns expressed by them. She is also interested in data dissemination, aiding in both the replication and expansion of computational research through building web applications for publicly available datasets.
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Mustafa Yavaş
Mustafa Yavas is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at Yale University. He is interested in inequality, class & culture, sociology of work, political sociology, and social networks. In his dissertation, he explores how globalization and class formation intertwine, focusing on the quality of work life of elite Turkish business professionals with high-prestige & high-salary corporate jobs. He also works on a project that aims to map the field of political opinion in contemporary Turkey and its change over time via combining social networks analysis with automated text analysis of columns in daily newspapers.
Website
Image of Faiz Ahamad
Faiz Ahamad
Faiz Ahamad is a PhD candidate at the School of Management and Labor Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, India. He is working in the area of Organizational behaviour with special focus on the recruitment process and social media. He has examined the advantages as well as challenges in the online recruitment process such as applicant’s job search behaviour, recruitment effectiveness, gender and ideological based discrimination, etc. He applies both fields as well as digital experiments involving computational social science methods.
Website
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Bann Seng Tan
Bann Seng Tan is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science & International Relations, Bogazici University. He received his PhD from the Graduate Center at the City University New York. His research revolves around the causes and effects of democratization. My recent work is on the effective use of foreign aid in democracy promotion. A second focus is on authoritarian reactions to disaster aid.
Image of İrem Aydaş
İrem Aydaş
İrem Aydaş is a second-year master student in Conflict Analysis and Resolution at Sabancı University. Her main areas of interests are public opinion, persuasion, political communication, and political participation. In her master thesis, she focuses on the effect of interpersonal discussions on political participation.
Image of Hossein Kermani
Hossein Kermani
Hossein Kermani is a PhD candidate of Social Communication Science at Tehran University, where he received his master degree working on political participation and Facebook usage in Iran. He is currently working on his PhD research project in Department of Political Science at the University of Zurich. Hossein achieved first and second rank in Iranian M.A and PhD entrance exams respectively. His research mainly revolves around the discursive power of social media in making meaning, shaping practices, changing the microphysics of power and playing with the political, cultural and social structures in Iran. Following his interests, Hossein has done several studies to shed light on Iranians’ everyday life on social media. He is also contributing author to the recently published book Social Media in Iran. Moreover, his first book social media research in Iran will be published in 2019. Moreover, he currentlyworks on his second book: Textual Analyses on Social Media.
Image of Yunus Emre Tapan
Yunus Emre Tapan
Emre is a master student at Middle Eastern Technical University in Middle East Studies program. He took his bachelor degree in Economics in Bogazici University. His main area of interests are social network analysis and computational sociology. He works on digital drivers of radicalization and extremism in digital space. He worked as a research assistant in a couple of funded projects employing tools of computational social science.
Website
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Ahmet Kurnaz
Ahmet is a PhD student at Çanakkale 18 Mart University’s Department of Political Science. Ahmet comes from a computer science background and has advanced knowledge of R. He works on polarisation and political communication online and specialises in text mining and analysis. He was a visiting researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute in 2017 and 2018, and the University of Maryland, College Park in 2015.
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Damla Partanaz
Damla is an Interactive Media Designer. She has recently completed her master’s degree at Kadir Has University’s New Media Department and serves as a teaching and research assistant there. Damla is interested in design implications of Artificial Intelligence, Human-Machine Collaboration, mental models and system design. Currently, she is working on her system design project in which human creativity meets with machine learning in coping with undesired behavior models. She is also in the design committee of Kadir Has University’s Computational Thinking undergraduate program curriculum and has an interest in teaching computational tools for non-computer scientists.
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Prof. Bruno
Prof. Bruno received his PhD in purrrrrrology several years ago. Their research has explored the dilemma: should one stay inside or go outside after the door has been opened after multiple meows. Their research is published in the best journals of their field: Paw & Society, European Journal of Whiskers Studies, and, Annual Review of Fluffiness. Many of their close colleagues participated international documentary 'Cats of Istanbul'.

University of Bamberg

All Participants


Image of Julian Hohner
Julian Hohner
Julian Hohner is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Bamberg University. He also works in the Management of the Bamberg Graduate School of Social Sciences and is particular interested in machine learning, quantitative text analysis, inferential statistics as well as populist, party and governmental behaviour studies. Moreover, Julian is participating as Teaching Assistant of the ECPR Winter/Summer Schools on a regular basis.
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Thomas Saalfeld
Thomas Saalfeld is Professor of Political Science at the University of Bamberg and Director of the Bamberg Graduate School of Social Sciences. Prior to joining Bamberg in 2009, he held research and teaching positions at the Universities of the German Federal Armed Forces Munich, Hull, Dresden, Kent and Bamberg. He was Member of the Council of the German Political Science Association from 2015 to 2016 and joined the Executive Committee of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) in 2018. Since 2015 he has been the local organizer of the ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques. He has a particular interest in text-as-data applied to legislative studies.
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Carsten Schwemmer
Carsten Schwemmer is currently finishing a PhD in Sociology at Bamberg University, Germany. His research focuses on computational methods for the study of ethnic minorities and social media communication. Carsten is particularly interested in natural language processing, data mining and software development. He gave courses on computational social science at University of Bamberg, University of Constance and Humboldt University of Berlin.
Website
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Andreas Jungherr
Andreas Jungherr is a Juniorprofessor (Assistant Professor) for Social Science Data Collection and Analysis at the University of Konstanz. He studies the impact of digital media on politics and society. He has worked on the uses of digital media and technology by publics, political actors, and organizations in international comparison. He also addresses challenges for scientific research in reaction to digital change in order to realize opportunities emerging from new data sources and analytical approaches. In this, he has focused on harnessing the potential of digital methods and computational social science while addressing methodological challenges in its integration into the social sciences. Depending on the object under study, he also uses traditional quantitative and qualitative empirical approaches. Currently, he is lead investigator of 'Communicative Power in Hybrid Media Systems', a project financed by the Volkswagen Stiftung (2017-2020). The interdisciplinary project, featuring computer and information scientists, focuses on the interconnection between political coverage in legacy, online media, and political talk on online platforms in Germany, UK, USA, and South Korea.
Website
Image of Fariba Karimi
Fariba Karimi
Fariba Karimi is a researcher at the Department of Computational Social Science at GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences. She received her PhD in Physics with specialization in network science. Her current research focuses on computational approaches for addressing societal challenges such as gender inequality, bias in algorithms and sampling hard-to-reach groups and minorities. Her main expertise is analyzing large-scale socio-technical systems using network theory and data analysis.
Website
Image of Ridhi Kashyap
Ridhi Kashyap
Ridhi Kashyap is associate professor of social demography and fellow of Nuffield College at the University of Oxford. She completed her DPhil in Sociology jointly affiliated with the University of Oxford and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. Her research spans a number of substantive areas in demography and sociology, including gender, mortality and health, the diversification of family forms, and ethnicity and migration. Her work has sought to adopt computational innovations both in terms of modelling approaches such as agent-based models and digital trace data from web and social media platforms to study social and demographic processes. She is currently leading a Data2X and UN Foundation supported project that uses big data from the web, in particular large-scale online advertising data that provide information on the aggregate numbers of users of online platforms by demographic characteristics, to measure sustainable development and gender inequality indicators.
Website
Image of Oliver Posegga
Oliver Posegga
Oliver Posegga is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Information Systems and Social Networks at the University of Bamberg, an affiliate of the Center for Collective Intelligence at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a principal investigator of the project 'Communicative Power in Hybrid Media Systems', funded by the Volkswagen Foundation. His research focuses on understanding the collective dynamics of digitally enabled networks, such as collective behavior and intelligence in organizational and societal settings, and touches a variety of topics, such as the dynamics of social networks, crisis management, crowdsourcing, data- and information quality, and discursive power in contemporary media systems.
Image of Martijn Schoonvelde
Martijn Schoonvelde
Martijn Schoonvelde is an Assistant Professor in Political Science at University College Dublin. Prior to that, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the University of Exeter and a Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence. In his work, he analyzes the rhetoric of politicians. Is this rhetoric driven by strategy, ideology or aspects of their personality? Do they shift blame to others when topics are sensitive with the public? And when do they use emotional appeals? More broadly, his interests include political communication, EU politics, computational social science, and text as data.
Website
Image of Milena Tsvetkova
Milena Tsvetkova
Milena Tsvetkova is Assistant Professor at the Department of Methodology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to that, she was Postdoctoral Researcher in Computational Social Science at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. She holds a PhD in Sociology from Cornell University, where she worked with Michael Macy. Her interests reside in the field of computational social science. In her research, she uses large-scale web-based social interaction experiments, network analysis of online data, and agent-based modeling to investigate fundamental social phenomena such as cooperation, social contagion, segregation, and inequality.
Website
Image of Alexander Brand
Alexander Brand
I am a master student in the field of sociology at the University of Bamberg. My research focuses on applying computational methods for the studies of dynamic systems. I’m particularly interested in agent- based modeling, social network analysis and non-linear effects. I presented part of my research at the Historical network research conference last year and at the Studentischer Soziologiekongress 2017 in Chemnitz.
Image of Endre Borbáth
Endre Borbáth
Endre Borbáth is a postdoctoral researcher at the Chair for Political Sociology at the Freie Universität Berlin, and at the Center for Civil Society Research at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. His research concerns party competition and protest politics in a comparative, European perspective. He tweets @eborbath.
Website
Image of Meng Chen
Meng Chen
Meng Chen is an Assistant Professor in Communication at Webster University, Vienna. She is interested in utilizing computational analysis to explore the interactions among linguistic features of cancer patients’ online posts, their personal network structures, and social capital flow on social support platforms. Before coming to Vienna, she completed a PhD in Communication at University of California, Davis.
Image of Lea Cohausz
Lea Cohausz
I am currently pursuing a MSc in Data Science and a MA in Sociology from the University of Mannheim. I am interested in combining methodologies from the fields of computer science and social science in particular regarding Big Data, network analysis, and agent based modeling. My main focus lies on getting a better understanding of the micro-macro-link of various social science problems.
Image of Jannis Denecke
Jannis Denecke
Jannis Denecke is currently pursuing a master’s degree in psychology, as well as in social and economic data science at the University of Konstanz. He holds a B.Sc. in Psychology. His interests lie within the field of cognitive psychology and research methods. Especially modelling aspects and memory, with a focus on neurodegenerative processes are of special interest to him. His current research project focuses on interference with and protection of memoranda in short term memory.
Image of Nourhan Elsayed
Nourhan Elsayed
Nourhan Elsayed is a MA student at the University of Mannheim’s Political Science department. Her research interests include authoritarian regimes, migration and refugees, the politics of the far right and the role of emotions in politics. She is equally interested in how research can drive political and social change. Nourhan received her BS in international politics from Georgetown University.
Image of Susanne Freund
Susanne Freund
Susanne Freund just finished her PhD in social and organizational psychology at the Catholic University Eichstätt-Ingolstadt (KU). Her main research interests concern prosocial behavior, social justice, communication and conflicts, organizational development, innovative communities, evaluation methods as well as impact research. She has worked in and managed serveral research projects concerning these topics. Additionally, she lectures in social psychology and research methods at the KU.
Image of Johannes Geiger
Johannes Geiger
Johannes is a master's student at the University of Essex and the University of Bamberg, where he is pursuing a degree in conflict resolution and political science. His main interest lies in cybersecurity and how governments respond to the emerging threat of high-level cyber attacks. In his master's thesis, he is exploring potential macro-level determinants of interstate cyber disputes and their connection with the onset of more traditional types of warfare.
Image of Leonie Geyer
Leonie Geyer
Leonie Geyer currently is an MA student of Political Science at the Otto-Friedrich-University of Bamberg (2017-2019). Before that, she did her undergraduate studies in Political Science and Historical Studies at the Johannes-Gutenberg University in Mainz (2014-2017). Her core academic interests lie in analytical political philosophy and ethics, game theory and computational analysis.
Image of Florian Gilberg
Florian Gilberg
Florian Gilberg is completing his MA in Political Management, Public Policy and Public Administration at the NRW School of Governance in Duisburg, Germany. As a research assistant for Prof. Dr. Andreas Blätte, he works in the field of corpus linguistics and text mining. He is broadly interested in data and network visualization, as well as political communication and healthcare management.
Website
Image of Andrea Hasenkopf
Andrea Hasenkopf
Andrea is a research assistant and a PhD candidate in International Relations at the University of Bamberg, Germany. Her primary research interest concerns the evolution of institutional complexes and their consequences on international governance. She has a keen interest in exploring how big data and computational social science can be used to advance the study of international politics in general and of inter-organizational networks in particular. She is also broadly interested in political sociology, social media, and computational analysis.
Image of Sophie Horneber
Sophie Horneber
Sophie is completing her master's degree at the University of Mannheim. Her primary research interests concern survey design and methodology with a special focus on survey experiments and response biases. She is also broadly interested in political sociology, development research, experimental designs and causal analysis. Sophie holds a bachelor's degree in Sociology with a minor in methods of empirical social research from the University of Bamberg. She has been working as research assistant at the Leibniz Institute for Educational Trajectories and Kantar Public and was supervisor of the fieldwork in Uganda for the German Institute for Economic Research. At the moment, she is working as research assistant in the department of Cross-Cultural Surveys at GESIS Mannheim.
Manuel Kleinert
Manuel Kleinert is a PhD candidate at the department of Sociology at Giessen University. His research focuses on integrating theories and applying diverse methods of CSS in multilevel and longitudinal contexts in order to generate new insights on causes and effects of group-based values and attitudes. Manuel holds a Bachelor and Master Degree in Political Science from the University of Bamberg.
Website
Image of Marc Luettecke
Marc Luettecke
Marc Luettecke is a Master's student in Social and Economic Data Science at the University of Konstanz. He holds a Bachelor's degree in Finance from Loyola University New Orleans and a Master's degree in Finance from the University of Texas (Austin). His preferred research interest lays with individual and group decision behavior, for which he currently learns techniques from the realm of Deep Learning and financial risk behavior for current class and research projects. His past endevaors include positions as a financial consultant and social involvement for housing projects in the Austin area.
Image of Daniel Mayerhoffer
Daniel Mayerhoffer
Daniel Mayerhoffer is a PhD candidate at the chair for Political Theory, University of Bamberg and an M.A. student in Ethics of Textual Cultures at FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg. He received his B.A. in Philosophy & Economics from University of Bayreuth, an M.A. in Political Science from University of Bamberg and an M.Sc. in Social Research Methods from University of Surrey. Daniel develops agent based computational simulation models to understand and explain social, political and economic phenomena.
Image of Muhammad Quasim Pasta
Muhammad Quasim Pasta
Qasim Pasta is Assistant Professor at Usman Institute of Technology. He recently received his Ph.D. (Network Science) from PAF-KIET, Pakistan. His recent work contributes to the development of network models enabling the embedding of ground-truth community structures. He is also leading an interdisciplinary research project SPLOP (Socio-Political Landscape of Pakistan) to analyze the usage of social media in the context of general and political conversation by people of different regions of Pakistan.
Image of Liane Rothenberger
Liane Rothenberger
Liane Rothenberger is a senior researcher and lecturer at the Institute of Media and Communication Science at Technische Universität Ilmenau, Germany. Her research focuses on journalism and communication in an intercultural perspective, norms and values in communication studies and in the social sciences, and crisis communication.
Website
Image of Lucas Sage
Lucas Sage
Lucas Sage is a Ph.D. student in sociology at Sorbonne University and at the University of Trento. In his dissertation, he analyzes the causes of wage inequality between observably similar workers (within group wage inequality). He is also interested in the interplays between residential and school segregation dynamics. His research relies on econometric methods and agent based models. He was previously a student of the Ecole Normale Supérieure of Paris-Saclay and he holds a M.Phil in Sociology (Sorbonne University), and a MSc. in Applied Economics (Panthéon-Sorbonne University).
Image of Christopher Schmidt
Christopher Schmidt
Currently: MSc Computing in the Humanities. Before: BA Sociology & Psychology. Python, R, NLP, Knowledge Graphs, Understanding & Visualizing Data.
Image of Indira Sen
Indira Sen
Indira is a first year doctoral researcher in GESIS, Leibniz Institute for Social Sciences, Cologne. Her interest lies in understanding biases in inferential studies from digital traces, with a focus on computational linguistics and natural language processing. Before, GESIS, Indira completed her Bachelors and Master's in India and has interned at NTU, Singapore and EPFL, Switzerland.
Image of Stephan Simon
Stephan Simon
Stephan Simon is a researcher and doctoral candidate at the Chair of Political Sociology at the University of Bamberg. He holds an MA in Social Sciences from the Humboldt University of Berlin. His research focuses on how different types of immigration policies affect immigrant integration outcomes, and citizens’ views toward the political system. He is interested in applying computational social science methods to examine how social media use shapes citizens’ views toward immigration and democracy.
Website
Image of Aleksandra Urman
Aleksandra Urman
Aleksandra is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Communication and Media Studies, University of Bern, Switzerland. She focuses on political communication online and actively uses computational methods in her research. Aleksandra is particularly interested in news consumption on social media platforms, the role of social media in authoritarian regimes, algorithmic personalization, and polarization online. She also teaches social media analysis with R.
Website
Image of Franziska Weeber
Franziska Weeber
Franziska Weeber is currently pursuing her MSc in Social and Economic Data Science at the University of Konstanz. Her research interests include spatial aspects of inequality with a focus on gentrification and social segregation as well as spatial interaction in both small and large scale contexts. She is also interested in data retrieval using computational methods such as web scraping. Franziska holds a BA in sociology with a minor in computer science from the University of Konstanz. During her Bachelor, she completed an internship and a freelance contract for the Federal Statistical Office of Germany.
Image of Jonas Reissmann
Jonas Reissmann
Jonas Reissmann is a Master’s student in Survey Statistics at the University of Bamberg and holds a BA in Political Science from the same institution. He is particularly interested in R programming, quantitative modelling and the field of interest group research. Jonas has gained experience as a teaching assistant for statistics and R on various occasions both at the university and at the ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques.

University of Cape Town

All Participants


Image of Vissého Adjiwanou
Vissého Adjiwanou
Vissého Adjiwanou is Adjunct Senior Lecturer in Demography and Quantitative Methods at the University of Cape Town (South Africa), Associate Professor in Sociologie (Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM, Canada). His research interests include maternal and reproductive health, family dynamics, and female employment in sub-Saharan Africa. Vissého is the chair of the Panel on Computational Social Science at the Union for African Population Studies (UAPS).
Website
Image of Tom Moultrie
Tom Moultrie
Tom Moultrie is Professor of demography, and Director of the Centre for Actuarial Research (CARe) at the University of Cape Town. His interests lie in the technical measurement and sociology of fertility in sub-Saharan Africa, and the sociology of demographic measurement. He holds a BBusSc (Actuarial Science) from UCT, a MSc (Development Studies) from the LSE, and a PhD from LSHTM.
Image of Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and he is affiliated with several of Princeton's interdisciplinary research centers: the Office for Population Research, the Center for Information Technology Policy, the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research interests include social networks and computational social science. He is the author of the book *Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.*
Website
Image of Chris Bail
Chris Bail
Chris Bail is the Douglas and Ellen Lowey Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University and a member of the Interdisciplinary Program on Data Science, the Duke Network Analysis Center, and the Duke Population Research Institute. His research examines how non-profit organiations and other political actors shape social media discourse using large text-based datasets and apps for social science research. He is the author of *Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream*.
Website
Image of Megan Bruwer
Megan Bruwer
Megan Bruwer is a transportation engineer with a background in civil engineering. She joined the Civil Engineering Department of Stellenbosch University in 2015 as a lecturer and project coordinator of the Stellenbosch Smart Mobility Laboratory (SSML) researching ITS solutions for developing countries. Prior to joining Stellenbosch University, Megan worked as a transport engineering consultant, involved in the implementation and operational design of public transport systems and road based traffic accommodation for new developments. Her research interests include traffic flow theory and the application of Intelligent Transport Systems to improve traffic data collection for transport planning and traffic management. She is currently completing a PhD in this field.
Website
Image of Marshini Chetty
Marshini Chetty
Marshini Chetty will be joining the Department of Computer Science at the University of Chicago in August 2019. She specializes in human-computer interaction, usable security, and ubiquitous computing. Marshini designs, implements, and evaluates technologies to help users manage different aspects of Internet use from privacy and security to performance, and costs. She often works in resource-constrained settings and uses her work to help inform Internet policy. She has a Ph.D. in Human-Centered Computing from Georgia Institute of Technology, USA and a Masters and Bachelors in Computer Science from University of Cape Town, South Africa. Marshini is currently a research scholar in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University and prior to that, she was an assistant professor in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her work has won best paper awards at CHI and CSCW and has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Security Agency, Intel, Microsoft, Facebook, and multiple Google Faculty Research Awards.
Website
Image of Nick Feamster
Nick Feamster
As of July 2019, Nick Feamster is Neubauer Professor of Computer Science and the Director of Center for Data and Computation (CDAC) at the University of Chicago. Previously, he was a full professor in the Computer Science Department at Princeton University, where he directed the Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP); prior to Princeton, he was a full professor in the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. His research focuses on many aspects of computer networking and networked systems, with a focus on network operations, network security, and censorship-resistant communication systems. He received his Ph.D. in Computer science from MIT in 2005, and his S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2000 and 2001, respectively. He was an early-stage employee at Looksmart (acquired by AltaVista), where he wrote the company's first web crawler; and at Damballa, where he helped design the company's first botnet-detection algorithm.
Website
Image of Kyle Finlay
Kyle Finlay
Kyle runs an international data science team for a large market research firm. His team focuses on R&D, including in areas such as networks and NLP. In his spare time, he maintains a blog that applies a computational social science lens to understanding South African politics on social media.
Image of Vukosi Marivate
Vukosi Marivate
Vukosi Marivate holds a PhD in Computer Science (Rutgers University, as a Fulbright Scholar). He is a senior Data Scientist and acting research group leader for Data Science at the CSIR, focusing on creating/using Machine Learning/Artificial Intelligence to extract insights from data to tackle societal challenges. Vukosi is an organiser of the Deep Learning Indaba, the largest Machine Learning/Artificial Intelligence workshop on the African continent, aiming to strengthen African Machine Learning. He supervises postgraduate students and leads the CSIR’s Data Science student development program.
Website
Image of Hussein Suleman
Hussein Suleman
Hussein Suleman is Head of Department and Associate Professor in Computer Science at the University of Cape Town. Hussein's main research interests are in digital libraries, ICT4D, African language information retrieval, cultural heritage preservation, Internet technology and educational technology. He has in the past worked extensively on architecture and interoperability issues related to digital library systems, with a growing emphasis on the relationship between low resource conditions and such architectures.
Image of Nyamador Komla David Adenyo
Nyamador Komla David Adenyo
Nyamador Komla David Adenyo is a PhD candidate in Statistics and Probability, at the Institute of Mathematics and Physical Science , University of Abomey-Calavi (Benin). He got a Master degree in Statistics and Probability. His research interests is Dynamic Panel data models with interactive fixed effects.
Image of Lateef Amusa
Lateef Amusa
Lateef Amusa is a lecturer at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria. He is currently rounding up his PhD programme in Applied Statistics at the University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa. He holds a BSc (First class honours) and a master’s degree in Statistics from the University of Ilorin, Nigeria. His research interests include the use of Spatial and data mining models, big data analytic methods with application to social science, health and medicine.
Image of Boladé Hamed Banougnin
Boladé Hamed Banougnin
Boladé is a demographer with work experience of about six years in design and data collection, data processing, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination. In 2012, he graduated from the Institut de Formation et de Recherche Démographiques—a regional institute for population studies—of the University of Yaoundé (Cameroon). He is currently undertaking his Ph.D. study in Reproductive Health Science at the Panafrican University, Life and Earth Sciences Institute at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. His past and ongoing projects examine the relationship between poverty and fertility, the fertility of migrants in urban areas, the stall in fertility decline in Sub-Saharan Africa. He has also been teaching a variety of courses in demography and statistics at the University of Parakou and Abomey-Calavi (Benin) since 2014. Prior to this position, he worked as an intern at the Benin national institute of statistics where he was involved in several population and development projects.
Image of Garikayi Chemhaka
Garikayi Chemhaka
Garikayi Chemhaka is a lecturer at the University of Eswatini. His current research interests focuses on sexual and reproductive health, family formation and fertility. His broad interests are in traditional quantitative methods and use of online data. Garikayi holds a PhD from University of the Witwatersrand, an MPhil from UCT, and MSc from University of Zimbabwe (UZ) in Demography and Population Studies. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Statistics from UZ.
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Fidelia Dake
Dr. Fidelia Dake is a Lecturer at the Regional Institute for Population Studies at the University of Ghana. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy and a Master of Philosophy in Population Studies. She also holds a Master of Science in Global Ageing and Policy and a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Food Science. Her research focuses broadly on health demography, public health, and international health and development. Her interests include nutrition and physical activity, obesity and non-communicable diseases, socio-environmental determinants of health, urban health, health statistics (including vital statistics), and health-financing, particularly, universal health coverage. Her current research examines transportation-related physical activity and the public health impacts of physical inactivity.
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Justin Dansou
Justin got a PhD degree in Reproductive Health from the Pan African University Institute for Life and Earth Sciences (PAULESI), located at the University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Prior to his doctoral studies, he graduated with a master’s degree in Demography at the Institut de Formation et de Recherche Démographiques (IFORD) in Cameroon, and a Bachelor of Science degree in computing management at the Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) of Université de Parakou in Benin. He worked as research assistant at the Institut de Formation et de Recherche Démographiques (IFORD). Currently, he gives lectures pertaining to demographic analysis at the École Nationale de la Statistique, de la Planification et de la Démographie (ENSPD) at the Université de Parakou. His research interest includes Population and Health; Reproductive Health including Maternal health and Child survival.
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Dereje Danbe Debeko
Dereje Danbe Debeko is an assistant professor at Department of Statistics, Hawassa University. He had intensive research and teaching experience in last 11 years from where he was hired as graduate assistant at Aksum University in 2009. He has thought different practical and theoretical statistics courses for the last eleven years. Dereje have been involved and had good research experience in area of longitudinal data analysis. His research interest mainly focuses on modeling hierarchical and repeated observations trends in various fields of studies. Currently, Dereje is in the position of “Associate dean for research and technology transfer” at College of natural and computational sciences, Hawassa University.
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Chodziwadziwa Whiteson Kabudula
Chodziwadziwa Whiteson Kabudula is a Senior Researcher and Head of Data and Analysis at the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. His research interest is on the application of demographic, statistical, computational and informatics techniques to investigate population-level morbidity, mortality and utilization of health services, and their social determinants in rural settings in Sub Saharan Africa.
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Reesha Kara
Reesha Kara holds a Master's Degree in Population Studies from the University of KwaZulu-Natal and is in the final year of her PhD at Rhodes University. Her research focuses on marriage and childbearing among middle-aged women in South Africa. Using social statistics, Reesha's work identifies changes in trends of non-marital fertility among middle-aged women, key determinants of these trends and what these changes could possibly mean when focusing on the family as the basic building block of society. Reesha's research interests include family formation structures, gender dynamics within relationships, social statistical methodologies, adolescent fertility and safe sexual and reproductive behaviours. Reesha has completed a number of training courses in social statistical methods and aims to use her research to highlight the value and importance of using social statistics to understand complex social behaviour and phenomenon.
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Caroline Kiarie
Caroline Kiarie is a PhD candidate at University of Kwazulu Natal in Durban, South Africa and a tutor fellow in the same institution. She holds a Masters in Science degree in Communication and Marketing from Franklin University in Ohio, USA. Her research interests include interpersonal communication, social media and social networks among employees. While in Kenya, she lectures corporate communication and public relations courses at Daystar University and Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT). She specializes in corporate communication and public relations and has worked and trained with several organizations both in Kenya and USA.
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Dagnon Eric Koba
Dagnon Eric Koba is a doctoral student at the Institut de Formation et de Recherche Démographiques (IFORD) at the University of Yaoundé II in Cameroon. With expertise in Demography, Digital demography and Social Statistics, his main research interests include, women’s reproductive health, gender inequality and migration.
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Wim Louw
Wim Louw is a Senior Research Associate at J-PAL Africa. He works on randomized evaluations of signaling mechanisms in active labour markets, focusing on youth employment in Gauteng, South Africa. Before joining J-PAL, Wim worked as a researcher in the South African non-profit sector. Wim holds a master's degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science in social research methods, and from the University of KwaZulu-Natal in linguistics. Interests include: causal inference, metrics, political economy and governance, text analysis, applied machine learning for economics, reproducibility and open source development.
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Katleho Makatjane
Katleho Makatjane is a PhD candidate in applied business statistics at the North West University Mafikeng campus South Africa and senior member of the South African Statistical Association (SAS) and certificated member of the Institute of Certificated and Chartered Statisticians of South Africa (ICCSSA). His research interests are focused on Financial forecasting, business analytic and risk analysis.
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Kathryn McDermott
Kathryn is a Junior Research Fellow based at J-PAL Africa at the University of Cape Town. She has a Masters in Economics from Stellenbosch University. She does research about water and electricity use and household purchasing patterns. Her interests are in using non-traditional data for research and helping policy makers use administrative data to inform their policy decisions.
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Elton Mukonda
Elton is currently a PhD student and Research Fellow in the Division of Epidemiology & Bio-statistics, University of Cape Town. He is a trained demographer and statistician with extensive experience in data management, statistical analysis and modelling. His research focuses on the use of simulation modelling to solve public health problems while his current work focuses on maternal and child health issues in the context of HIV and other co-morbidities. Other fields of interest include Bayesian Statistics, Simulation and Optimization, Decision Analytic, Modelling for Economic Evaluation, Statistical Learning, Big Data Analytics and Chronic Disease Monitoring.
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Ronald Musizvingoza
Ronald Musizvingoza is a Social Scientist with a background in Sociology, Demography and Statistics. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Sociology at Bursa Uludağ University in Turkey. He is working on the Social Determinants of Maternal Health in Zimbabwe. Furthermore, he received training in data analysis and demographic analysis. His research interests are sustainable development goals (gender, health and inequality), migration and ageing. He is also currently interested in exploring the use of big data to achieve SDGs, especially in developing countries.
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Larissa Nawo
Larissa Nawo has just finished her Ph.D. in Applied Economy policy and Analysis at the University of Dschang, Cameroon. Currently, Larissa is a research fellow cohort 2019 at the Structural Transformation of African Agriculture and Rural Spaces (STAARS) project of Cornell University. Her research interest is an intersection between development economics and data analysis studies, which include but not restricted to natural resources revenues management, behaviour sciences, impact evaluation techniques, computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelling, computational social science methods, applied micro econometric and applied political economy. During her doctoral studies, she was a Ph.D. visiting fellow at the United Nations University World Institute for Development Economics Research (UNU-WIDER) in Helsinki (Finland).
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Sindiso Ndlovu
Sindiso Ndlovu is a doctoral candidate in Demography and Population studies at the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa. She hold a Masters and Honours degree in Health Demography and her research interests lie in the field of family and health demography with specific focus on fertility, child health and policy. Her PhD thesis focuses on the intersection of health and family demography in a SSA countries.
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Baruwa Ololade
Baruwa Ololade is a doctoral student of Population and Health Studies at North West University Mafikeng, South Africa. Prior to this, he had completed his master’s Degree at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg South Africa. Beside his educational profile, he is also an associate researcher with the International Organisation for Migration/Wits School of Public Health. Baruwa have worked at various organizations and played active roles in dealing with interdisciplinary research projects such as social determinant of health, sexual and reproduction health, maternal and child health and HIV/AIDS among migrants among many others.
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Douglas Parry
Douglas is a PhD candidate and junior lecturer at the Department of Information Science at Stellenbosch University in South Africa. As a member of the Cognition and Technology Research Group (CTRG) his research concerns the interplay between digital technologies, human cognition, behaviour, performance, and affective well-being across a variety of situations and contexts. He holds a bachelor’s degree majoring in Socio-Informatics and Economics, Honours and Master’s degrees in Socio-Informatics and is currently working towards a doctoral degree specifically focusing on media multitasking and cognitive control. The common thread across his projects rests on an interest in understanding how people use technology, how this use is shaped by personal, situational and societal factors and, in addition, how behaviour with technology shapes our personal, social, and working lives. He has experience with traditional, experimental and data-driven research projects across a variety of academic domains.
Website
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Arsene B. Sandie
Arsene B. Sandie is completing his Ph.D in Mathematics-Statistics at Pan African University at Nairobi. He had mixed academic background, which intersects within mathematics and computer science (Bsc), applied statistics (Msc) and demography studies (Msc). His current research is about developing statistical methods for the design and analysis of clinical trials. Nowadays, he is aspiring to capitalize his multidisciplinary background, the computational social science area is then a great and exciting opportunity for that purpose.
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Patrick Tenga Shako
Patrick Tenga Shako is a Junior Lecturer/Teacher Assistant attached to the faculty of Computer sciences at the Nouveaux Horizons University and a candidate for a postgraduate degree at the University of Lubumbashi. Holder of an honour degree from the University of Lubumbashi and a master's degree from the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Senegal, he has developed a real interest for data sciences, numerical analysis and mathematical modelling. After attending schools on big data, computational neuroscience, he acquired a real passion for artificial intelligence (Machine Learning, Reinforcement Learning). From this, he understood that one cannot do data analysis without understanding the domain in which these data belong. He expects to specialize in data science and mathematical modelling and plans to establish in the coming years an interdisciplinary research laboratory in data sciences in order to promote interaction and complementarity between different fields.
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Henry Wandera
Henry Wandera is pursuing MIT in data science at University of Pretoria. He holds BSc Honours in Computer Science at University of Pretoria and BSc in Science Education at Busitema University - ganda. He is passionate about promoting technology usage in developing countries and applying data science for social good. His interests contribute to how policies may influence users’ perspectives and towards understanding the impact of policies on the use of technologies in educational context. In his MIT, he is applying machine learning algorithms to predict school performance in African countries (Sierra Leone, South Africa) using non-traditional data.
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Chipo Zidana
Chipo Zidana holds a PhD in Statistics from Cukurova university, Turkey, which was funded by the Turkish Government. She is currently a lecturer in the Department of Applied Mathematics at the National University of science and Technology, Zimbabwe. She has published work in population health and her current research focuses on machine learning approach to problems in rural livelihoods and health.
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Aldu Cornelissen
Aldu Cornelissen is a lecturer at the Department of Information Science at Stellenbosch University. He co-found the Computational Social Science group at Stellenbosch University, and is a member of the Centre of Artificial Intelligence (CAIR). The group’s research focuses on the impact of social media in society by investigating bot interference during political elections in Sub-Sahara Africa. Aldu specialises in Social Network Analysis, specifically individual and group social cognition.
Website
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Emmanuel Olamijuwon
Emmanuel Olamijuwon is a lecturer at the University of Eswatini, and a PhD candidate in demography and population studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. His research uses social media, digital tools and also adapts computational approaches in helping adolescents and young African adults make better and informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health. Emmanuel also plays an active role in various interdisciplinary research projects many of which revolve around the social determinants of health, as well as sexual and reproductive health. He is the coordinator of SHYad.NET
Website


Princeton University

All Participants


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Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and he is affiliated with several of Princeton's interdisciplinary research centers: the Office for Population Research, the Center for Information Technology Policy, the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research interests include social networks and computational social science. He is the author of *Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age*.
Website
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Chris Bail
Chris Bail is Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University where he directs the Polarization Lab. He is also affiliated with the Interdisciplinary Data Science Program, the Duke Network Analysis Center, and the Duke Population Research Institute. His research examines political polarization, culture and social psychology using tools from the field of computational social science. He is the author of *Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream*.
Website
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Abdullah Almaatouq
Abdullah Almaatouq is a Research Assistant in the Human Dynamics group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is pursuing a PhD in Computational Science & Engineering. Abdullah's work includes conducting theoretical and empirical research on human behavior using innovative approaches and tools ranging from complex systems theory and agent-based modeling, to network analysis, econometric techniques, and behavioral and experimental methods.
Website
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Justin Grimmer
Justin Grimmer is a Professor in Stanford University's Department of Political Science. His current research focuses on American political institutions, elections, and developing new machine-learning methods for the study of politics. He is the author of *Representational Style in Congress: What Legislators Say and Why It Matters* and *The Impression of Influence: Legislator Communication, Representation, and Democratic Accountability*.
Website
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Annie Liang
Annie Liang is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her PhD from Harvard in 2016, and she spent 2016-7 as a post-doctoral researcher at Microsoft Research-New England. Her research is in economic theory (in particular, learning and information), and the application of machine learning methods for theory building and evaluation.
Website
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Alondra Nelson
Alondra Nelson is President of the Social Science Research Council and Professor of Sociology at Columbia University, where she served as the inaugural Dean of Social Science. Her research focuses on how science and its applications may shape the social world, including aspects of personal identification, racial formation, and collective action. She is the author of multiple books, most recently *The Social Life of DNA: Race, Reparations, and Reconciliation after the Genome*.
Website
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Beth Noveck
Beth Noveck is a Professor in the Technology, Culture, and Society department at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, where she directs the Governance Lab. New Jersey governor Phil Murphy appointed her as the state’s first Chief Innovation Officer in 2018. Previously, Beth served as the first United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer and director of the White House Open Government Initiative under President Obama. UK Prime Minister David Cameron appointed her senior advisor for Open Government.
Website
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Jennifer Pan
Jennifer Pan is an Assistant Professor of Communication at Stanford University. She focuses on the politics of authoritarian countries in the digital age. How autocrats constrain collective action through online censorship, propaganda, and responsiveness. How information proliferation influences the ability of authoritarian regimes to conduct surveillance. How public preferences are arranged and formed. She combines experimental and computational methods with large-scale datasets on political activity in China and other authoritarian regimes to examine these questions.
Website
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Eric Schwartz
Eric Schwartz is the Editorial Director of Columbia University Press. He was previously senior editor for sociology and cognitive science at Princeton University Press and psychology editor at Cambridge University Press.
Website
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Brandon Stewart
Brandon Stewart is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Arthur H. Scribner Bicentennial Preceptor at Princeton University. He develops new quantitative statistical methods for applications across computational social science, with a focus on tools that facilitate automated text analysis and model complex heterogeneity in regression.
Website
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Chris Wiggins
Chris Wiggins is an associate professor of applied mathematics at Columbia University and the Chief Data Scientist at The New York Times. At Columbia he is a founding member of the executive committee of the Data Science Institute, and of the Department of Systems Biology, and is affiliated faculty in Statistics. He is a co-founder and co-organizer of hackNY, a nonprofit which since 2010 has organized once a semester student hackathons and the hackNY Fellows Program.
Website
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Bedoor Al Shebli
I am a Post-Doctoral Associate at New York University, Abu Dhabi. I received my PhD in Interdisciplinary Engineering from Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, and my MSc in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My research focuses on using data science techniques to study social phenomena, with a particular emphasis on social and economic benefits of diversity and the dynamics of social interaction and cohesion. I frame social science problems in the contexts of data science, big data, and machine learning. Cumulatively, my work contributes to the fields of computational social science, data science, and machine learning.
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Victoria Asbury
Victoria Asbury is doctoral student in sociology at Harvard University. Her research interests include social stratification, immigration, political discourse, and social policy. She draws on sociological, psychological, behavioral economic, and computational methods to explore relationships between discourse, group-boundaries, and social preferences. Before coming to Harvard, Victoria worked as a booking production-assistant at MSNBC. She received her MA in education and BA in African & African-American Studies from Stanford University.
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Felix Busch
Felix is a postdoctoral researcher at the Swiss Job Market Monitor, University of Zurich. He received his PhD in Sociology from Nuffield College, University of Oxford. In his dissertation, Felix examined the extent to which gender segregated labor markets produce wage inequality between occupations. In his current position, he builds applications that retrieve large amounts of job ad data from the web in order to monitor labor demand in Switzerland. His main academic interests are wage inequality, gender inequality, occupations, and labor market segregation. In his spare time, Felix thinks about how to use digital tools to solve social problems.
Website
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Nicholas Camp
Nick Camp is a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, where he received his PhD in social psychology in 2018. His research examines racial disparities in the everyday encounters between police officers and citizens, bridging psychological and sociological perspectives on these institutional interactions. To understand the causes and consequences of these inequities, his work draws on a range of methods, from computational studies of officer body-worn camera footage, experiments in community and lab settings, to analyses of traffic stop data. Nick received his B.A. in Psychology from Columbia University in 2009.
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Karina Caro
Karina Caro is an Assistant Professor of Informatics at the Faculty of Administrative and Social Sciences of the Autonomous University of Baja California in Ensenada, Mexico. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada, Mexico (CICESE Research Center). She worked as a postdoctoral researcher in the College of Computing and Informatics and in the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design at Drexel University. Her research interests are in human-computer interaction, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, accessibility, and videogames for health. Her research focuses on designing and evaluating technology to support cognitive and motor development of children with neurodevelopmental and genetic disorders such as autism, Down Syndrome, and Cerebral Palsy. All her current research projects intersect computing, medical and social sciences. She works very closely with specialists in the care of children with neurodevelopmental disorders such as neuro pediatricians and physical and occupational therapists, as well as, psychotherapists and special education teachers. Her overall research aim is to create technology for supporting the care of children with neurodevelopmental disorders, contributing to the acquisition and practice of the necessary skills to achieve children's independence.
Website
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Keng-Chi Chang
Keng-Chi Chang is a PhD Student in Political Science at University of California San Diego. His research interests include political methodology, the intersection of causal inference and statistical machine learning, and political economy. He is broadly interested in all aspects of computational social science. He completed his undergraduate studies in Economics at National Taiwan University.
Website
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Naniette H. Coleman
Naniette H. Coleman is a PhD candidate in the Sociology Department at UC Berkeley. Her work sits at the intersection of the sociology of culture and organizations and focuses on cybersecurity, surveillance, and privacy in the US context. Her research examines how organizations assess risk, make decisions, and respond to data breaches and organizational compliance with state, federal, and international privacy laws. Naniette holds a Master of Public Administration with a specialization in Democracy, Politics, and Institutions from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and both an M.A. in Economics and a B.A. in Communication from the University at Buffalo, SUNY. A non-traditional student, Naniette’s prior professional experience includes local, state, and federal service, as well as for two international organizations, and two universities.
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Thomas Davidson
Thomas Davidson is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Cornell University. His dissertation examines why far-right social movements and political parties have been so successful at using social media to build large online audiences and the extent to which these groups have influenced public debates on contentious political issues including immigration, Islam, and Brexit. More broadly, he is interested in combining computational methods and online data with more traditional quantitative methods to study politics and culture.
Website
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William Frey
William Frey (he/they) is a doctoral student at Columbia University's School of Social Work, coordinator of the SAFElab, and researcher in the Cogburn Research Group. His research focuses on race and whiteness within the context of digital technoculture, and the individual and collective role of white people in the perpetuation of socio-technological systems of domination and power (e.g., digital racism). He has expertise in contextual analysis of social media, social media data ethics, and community/domain expert involvement in computational mixed methods research. William received his M.S.W. in community organizing from the University of Michigan's School of Social Work.
Website
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Anton Gollwitzer
Anton Gollwitzer is a PhD student in the Automaticity in Cognition, Motivation, and Evaluation Laboratory at Yale University. He completed bachelor's degrees in psychology and computer science at New York University before joining Yale. Broadly construed, his research focuses on social cognition, individual differences, social perception, and motivation. Currently he is working on: (1) How do people think and feel about patterns and pattern deviancy, and how do these judgments impact social phenomena, (2) Generalized person perception: How the individual perceives people in general, and (3) Behavior-change interventions and motivational processes.
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Malka Guillot
Malka Guillot is a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Law and Economics at ETH Zürich. She received her Ph.D. in Economics with a focus on taxation and inequality from the Paris School of Economics. Her research applies computational approaches to problems in empirical public finance. She explores both dimensions of big data: its length, by using administrative data such as income tax returns and its width with text corpora such as the tax code.
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Jaren Haber
Jaren Haber is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research applies computational methods to study how organizational contexts shape the impacts of structural inequalities. Jaren’s dissertation—a complex project assisted by a dozen apprentices—researches whether ideological differentiation amongst charter schools reflects and reinforces stratification by race and class. In doing so, he uses web-crawling, mixed-effects models, and computational text analysis. Jaren also co-coordinates the Computational Text Analysis Working Group and the TextXD (Text Across Domains) symposium at UC Berkeley.
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Masyhur Hilmy
Masyhur is a PhD student in Economics at Boston University. His research interests include the economics of education, social protection, and migration. He previously worked at J-PAL Southeast Asia, where he was involved in RCTs to evaluate a community block grant program, a nationwide welfare eligibility census, and the expansion of Indonesia's national health insurance program to the informal sector. Masyhur received his bachelor’s degree from Institut Teknologi Bandung and his master’s degree from Kyoto University, both in Astronomy.
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Brooke Jarrett
Brooke Jarrett is a doctoral student of Infectious Disease Epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. She is broadly interested in how technology can lessen inequalities in healthcare access. Her dissertation explores the ethics and mental health impact of chatbots — computer programs that mimic human-to-human conversations. Methodologically, she hopes to use text analyses to quantify and describe potential harms of chatbots. Brooke holds an BS from MIT and MS from Northwestern University in environmental engineering.
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Jae Yeon Kim
Jae Yeon Kim is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of California, specializing in comparative historical approaches to the study of race, ethnicity, and politics. His research examines coalitional dynamics within minority communities, focusing on the conditions under which ethnic minority groups form a race-based coalition in the United States and elsewhere. Kim is interested in leveraging computational text analysis and machine learning to study how racial solidarity works in the post-civil rights era. Prior to coming to Berkeley, Kim worked in the tech industry.
Website
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Monika Leszczyńska
Monika Leszczyńska is Assistant Professor of Empirical Legal Research at the Maastricht University Faculty of Law, Netherlands. She received her PhD in law from University of Bonn (Germany). In her research, she uses laboratory and online experiments as well as content analysis to deliver evidence-based insights to legal decision-makers on the impact of law on human behavior. She studies how individuals make decisions in the online environment. She is looking at the contractual terms of free and paid digital transactions, how zero-price offers affect people’s decisions about their contractual rights and privacy as well as how digital contract formation (e.g., by clicking on OK) influences impulsive decisions. Monika holds also a master’s degree in law from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan (Poland), LLM degrees from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich (Germany) and New York University. In 2016/2017 she was a post-doctoral fellow at the New York University School of Law. During her doctoral studies, she was a research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods in Bonn (Germany).
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Katherine McCabe
Katherine McCabe is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University. Her research focuses on public opinion, political communication, and political psychology. She uses surveys, experiments, and text analysis to understand how people’s social identities, attitudes, and personal experiences shape and complicate the ways they engage in politics.
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Kevin Munger
Kevin Munger is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Princeton Center for the Study of Democratic Politics, and will begin as an Assistant Professor of Political Science and Social Data Analytics at Penn State University in the fall of 2019. He has conducted a series of field experiments on Twitter to study online norm enforcement. His current interests include the heterogeneity of online media effects — moderated by age and digital literacy — and developing a framework for conducting more "temporally valid" research in the rapidly-changing field of online social and political behavior.
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Margaret Ng
Margaret Ng is an Assistant Professor of Journalism and Computer Science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Her current research is on (1) technology use discontinuance, (2) technology and information diffusion, and (3) social media in news contexts. Methodologically, she takes a hybrid approach that combines big data, machine learning, as well as survey, and experimental research on media platforms. She received her Ph.D. in Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. Ng was an advanced analytics intern at Pew Research Center’s Data Labs and worked as a news artist at National Geographic Magazine, The Seattle Times and a data reporter for The Center for Public Integrity.
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Nynke Niezink
Nynke Niezink is an Assistant Professor in Statistics and Data Science at Carnegie Mellon University. She received her PhD from the Department of Sociology at the University of Groningen. Her research focuses on the development of statistical methods for network analysis, with applications in education, health sciences and management. For a recent project on criminal networks, she studied what drives violence among organized crime members.
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Amin Rahimian
Amin Rahimian is a postdoctoral associate at the MIT Institute for Data, Systems, and Society (IDSS). He received his masters in systems engineering and PhD in electrical and systems engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, and masters in statistics from the Wharton School at UPenn. His research interests include network science, statistics, control and decision theory, with applications to social and economic networks.
Website
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Sarah Rezaei
Sarah Rezaei is an assistant professor at the chair of Microeconomics at Utrecht University School of Economics. Her main fields of interest are Behavioral and Experimental Economics. She is particularly interested in social and economic networks, how they form, why they show certain patterns and how their structure impact on human behavior. Specifically, a large part of her research investigates the impact of the decision context on people's other-regarding and cooperative behavior theoretically and experimentally.
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Elizaveta Sivak
Elizaveta Sivak is currently pursuing a PhD in Sociology at Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow. She is also the head of the Center for Modern Childhood Research at the Institute of Education, HSE. Her dissertation project is concerned with modern parenting culture, or parents practices, folk theories on child-rearing, and discourse on parenting. Her other areas of interest include children’s everyday practices and well-being, gender bias in education, sociology of science and scientific communities, and the methodology of using digital trace data in social sciences.
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Stephanie Teeple
Stephanie Teeple is an MD-PhD candidate and doctoral student in the Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics at the University of Pennsylvania. She is interested in how nascent data technologies (machine learning, artificial intelligence) stand to harm marginalized populations in the healthcare setting and how we can do better. Stephanie received her BA from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and previously worked as a Post-Bachelor Fellow at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle, WA.
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Andrew Thompson
Andrew Thompson is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Northwestern University. His research interests span public opinion, causal inference, climate change, and immigration. His current work explores how demographic changes affect political attitudes and policy opinion using experimental and computational methods. Andrew holds a BA in Political Science and Philosophy from Marquette University.
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Austin van Loon
Austin van Loon is a PhD candidate in the Sociology department at Stanford University. He’s interested in the human search for shared meaning and how this is tied to broader social structures in both determinants and consequence. Using this theoretical lens, he studies organizational culture, political polarization, and interaction within organizations. He approaches these questions using computational methods (especially text analysis, machine learning, and agent-based simulations), experiments, social network analysis, and causal inference.
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Tiago Ventura
Tiago Ventura is a Ph.D. Student in Government and Politics at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research agenda focuses on comparative political economy, politics of crime and violence, with a regional focus in Latin America. His doctoral dissertation uses economic models of welfare to understand the impact of wealth inequality on citizens preferences for punitive policies and in the provision of security by the State. Additionally, Tiago has worked on a variety of projects using network analysis, experiments, and computational methods to understand framing, polarization, and social conflict on Twitter. Tiago is also an affiliated researcher at the Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Social Science at the University of Maryland.
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Florianne Verkroost
Florianne Verkroost is a second-year PhD candidate in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. She holds a BSc in Technology and Liberal Arts and Sciences, majoring in Applied Mathematics and Physics, from University of Twente as well as a MSc in Econometrics and Management Science from Erasmus University Rotterdam. Florianne’s main interests are in advanced quantitative methods, machine learning and the use of digital trace data. Given these interests and her interdisciplinary background, Florianne’s doctoral thesis focuses on applying such methods and data to questions of the reproduction of inequalities (e.g. gender, wealth and well-being) as a consequence of changes in family size and childlessness in particular.
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Yuan Yuan
Yuan Yuan is a PhD student in the MIT Institute for Data, Systems, and Society. His research aims to understand human behavior on online social networks, with a focus on prosocial behavior and social contagion. His research draws upon ideas from machine learning, causal inference, experimental design, and game theory. Before coming to MIT, Yuan received his Bachelor’s degrees in Computer Science and Economics from Tsinghua University.
Website
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Alex Kindel
Alex is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at Princeton University. He is interested in computational social science, historical sociology, and the formal organization of knowledge. His dissertation traces the development of statistical tools, methods, and standards in applied research since the 1950s.
Website
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Danielle Montagne
Danielle is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Duke University. She is interested in exploring cultural and economic sociology using computational and network methods. Her current research focuses on the organizational, structural, and cultural determinants of tie formation and multiplexity of roles using data about the popular music industry.
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Cambria Naslund
Cambria is a PhD student in sociology at Princeton University. She uses computational methods to study questions in the sociologies of science, medicine, and technology. Her current research explores public understandings of medical knowledge and diagnoses using text and image data from newspapers and crowdfunding campaigns. She completed her B.A. in Social Research and Public Policy at NYU Abu Dhabi.
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Tom Wolff
Tom is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Duke University. His interests include culture, networks, social psychology, inequality, and political sociology. Tom's current projects explore predictors of socioeconomic diversity in friendship networks and the ways in which political discourse changes in the presence of (in)complete information.
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Simone Zhang
Simone is a PhD student in sociology at Princeton University. Her research examines how technology is reshaping how people interact with the organizations they encounter in everyday life. She draws on experiments and digital trace data to study the implications of these shifts for social inclusion, socioeconomic outcomes, and trust in institutions.
Website

Oxford University

All Participants


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Ridhi Kashyap
Ridhi Kashyap is associate professor of social demography and fellow of Nuffield College at the University of Oxford. She completed her DPhil in Sociology jointly affiliated with the University of Oxford and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. Her research spans a number of substantive areas in demography and sociology, including gender, mortality and health, the diversification of family forms, and ethnicity and migration. Her work has sought to adopt computational innovations both in terms of modelling approaches such as agent-based models and digital trace data from web and social media platforms to study social and demographic processes. She is currently leading a Data2X and UN Foundation supported project that uses big data from the web, in particular large-scale online advertising data that provide information on the aggregate numbers of users of online platforms by demographic characteristics, to measure sustainable development and gender inequality indicators.
Website
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Nicolo Cavalli
Nicolò is a DPhil candidate in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. He holds a BA in Politics from University of Bologna and a MSc in Economics from Bocconi University, Milan. Before joining Nuffield College, Nicolò worked as journalist, reporting on social issues and political movements from Italy, Greece, Catalunya, California and Peru. His Doctoral Thesis focuses on how intergroup emotional stratification emerged in Europe in times of economic recession.
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Taylor Brown
Though a visiting scholar at NYU, Taylor Brown is a doctoral candidate in the Duke Sociology department, with association at the Duke Network Analysis Center. She has broad interests in computational methods and social media studies. Her dissertation explores gender inequality in creative professions. Taylor holds an MA in sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill and an MSc in evidence-based social intervention from the University of Oxford. Prior to beginning her PhD, Taylor fulfilled an appointment at the National Science Foundation in the division of Social and Economic Sciences.
Website
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Pablo Barbera
Pablo Barberá is an Assistant Professor of Computational Social Science at the London School of Economics. His research develops text and network analysis methods that improve our understanding of how exposure to political information through social media sites affects political behavior. He is also the authors of several R packages that allow scholars to collect and analyze social media data.
Website
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David Cox
Sir David Cox is a statistician known in particular for the proportional hazards model. This is widely used in the analysis of survival data and has been applied in the medical, physical, life, earth, and social sciences, as well as engineering fields. His 1972 paper introducing the model and its analysis is one of the 100 most-cited papers of all time for all fields. Cox’s career has included research positions in government supported research organizations, as well as academic appointments at Cambridge, University of North Carolina, Birkbeck College, Imperial College, and Nuffield College, where he was Warden, 1988-1994. He earned his PhD from the University of Leeds in 1949, after first studying mathematics at St. Johns College, Cambridge. Knighted in 1985, Cox is a fellow of the Royal Society, an honorary fellow of the British Academy and a foreign associate of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He has served as president of the Bernoulli Society, Royal Statistical Society and International Statistical Institute. In 2010, Cox received the Copley Medal, the Royal Society’s highest award, and in 2016, the International Prize in Statistics and shared the BBVA Foundation Prize for research in the physical sciences.
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Xiaowen Dong
Xiaowen Dong is a Departmental Lecturer in the Department of Engineering Science, a faculty member of the Oxford-Man Institute, and a research fellow of Somerville College, all at the University of Oxford. He is primarily interested in utilising graphs to model relational structure within the data, and developing novel techniques that lie at the intersection of machine learning, signal processing, and complex networks to study questions across social and economic sciences, with a particular focus on understanding human behaviour, decision making and societal changes.
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Ray Duch
Ray is an Official Fellow at Nuffield College, University of Oxford, and the Director of the Nuffield Centre for Experimental Social Sciences (CESS), which has centres in Oxford, Santiago (Chile), Tianjin (China) and Pune (India). Previously, he was the Senator Don Henderson Scholar in Political Science at the University of Houston. He received his PhD from the University of Rochester. He is currently the Long-Term Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies at the Toulouse School of Economics. Ray’s research uses experiments, digital trace and public opinion analysis to explain individual decision making. He has published extensively, including an award-winning book (The Economic Vote) on how economic outcomes affect democratic accountability. His work has appeared in forty leading journals in political science and economics. Ray’s current research agenda investigates the role of information acquisition in decision-making. In 2015, Ray was selected as a member of the UK Cabinet Office Cross-Whitehall Trial Advice Panel to assist Whitehall departments in designing and implementing experiments to assess policy effectiveness. He is a member of the Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP) network.
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Scott Hale
Dr Scott A. Hale is a Senior Data Scientist and Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute of the University of Oxford, UK, and a Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute. He develops and applies techniques from computer science to research questions in both computer science and the social sciences and puts the results into practice with industry partners. He is particularly interested in mobilization/collective action, agenda setting, and antisocial behaviour (e.g., hate speech) and has a strong track record in building tools and teaching programmes that enable social science researchers to access new methods and forms of data. At Oxford, he directs the Social Data Science programme, supervises postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers, and teaches postgraduate students.
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Melinda Mills
Melinda Mills (MBE, FBA) is the Nuffield Professor of Sociology at the University of Oxford and Nuffield College and the Director of the new Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science in Oxford She completed her PhD in Demography at the University of Groningen (Netherlands), and has further studied bioinformatics and genetics. She was the Editor of the European Sociological Review (2012-2016). Mills’ research spans a range of interdisciplinary topics at the intersection of demography, sociology, molecular genetics and statistics. Her substantive research specializes in fertility and human reproductive behaviour, assortative mating, labour market, nonstandard employment and chronotypes, life course and inequality. She currently leads the ERC funded programme SOCIOGENOME (www.sociogenome.com). Mills has published various statistics textbooks in R on survival and event history analysis (2011, Sage) and has a forthcoming book on applied quantitative genetics statistical analysis (2019, MIT Press). She serves on various national science Boards such as the Executive Council of the Ecnomic and Social Research Council RCUK, the non-Executive Supervisory Board of the Dutch Science Council (NWO) and the NHS Digital Research Advisory Group.
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Neave O'Clery
Originally from Dublin, Dr Neave O'Clery is currently a Senior Research Fellow at the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford where she leads a research group focused on data-driven models for economic development and the emergence of complexity for urban systems. Neave was previously a Fulbright Scholar and Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for International Development at the Harvard Kennedy School following her PhD (mathematics) at Imperial College. She is also founder and Editor in Chief of Angle – a journal based at Imperial College focusing on the intersection of policy, politics and science – since 2009.
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Nick Ruktanonchai
Nick Ruktanonchai is an infectious disease epidemiologist, currently working as a senior research fellow in the WorldPop Project at the University of Southampton. He is interested in understanding how vectorborne diseases move on complex landscapes of transmission, particularly when carried by human hosts. This has involved using human mobility data from a variety of sources, including from Android smartphones, feature phones, satellite imagery, and microcensus data. Through collaborations with organisations such as the Clinton Health Access Initiative, he works to ensure his research helps inform malaria elimination strategy worldwide.
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Mariarosaria Taddeo
Dr Mariarosaria Taddeo is Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, where she is the Deputy Director of the Digital Ethics Lab, and is Faculty Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute. Her recent work focuses mainly on the ethical analysis of Artificial Intelligence, cyber security , cyber conflicts, and ethics of digital innovation. Her area of expertise is Philosophy and Ethics of Information, although she has worked on issues concerning Epistemology, Logic, and Philosophy of AI. She has been listed among the top 50 most inspiring Italian women working in AI in 2018. Dr Taddeo has been awarded The Simon Award for Outstanding Research in Computing and Philosophy. She also received the World Technology Award for Ethics acknowledging the originality and her research on the ethics of cyber conflicts, and the social impact of the work that she developed in this area. Since 2016, Taddeo serves as editor-in-chief of Minds & Machines (SpringerNature) and of Philosophical Studies Series (SpringerNature).
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Sonja Vogt
Sonja Vogt received her PhD at the Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology (ICS) at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. She was then a senior research associate in the Department of Economics at the University of Zurich. From Zurich she moved to Oxford, where she was a senior postdoctoral officer at the Centre for Experimental Social Sciences in Oxford. Currently, Sonja is associate professor for sustainable social development at the University of Bern, and she is affiliated with Nuffield College and the Sociology Department at the University of Oxford. Sonja has published in Nature, Science, and Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Her research focuses on social development, with a particular emphasis on culturally sensitive topics where attitudes and behavior are hard to measure. Examples include female genital cutting, prenatal sex-selection, corruption, and various types of discrimination. Sonja has projects in Sudan, Armenia, Columbia, Brazil, Kenya, and Nigeria.
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Roberto Cerina
Roberto Cerina is a third-year DPhil candidate in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford, with an interest in Election Forecasting, Bayesian Statistics and non-representative surveys. His recent work has focused on making inference on electoral preferences from revealed behaviour on social-media; in particular, together with Professor Raymond Duch, he has forecasted the 2018 mid-term elections in Texas using likes from pages of public candidates on Facebook, leveraging the latest technology in prediction and post-stratification, and achieving results comparable to state-of-the-art surveys, at a fraction of the cost (see here from more: http://raymondduch.com/forecasts/). Currently he is working on forecasting the 2019 Indian Lok Sabha Elections using a convenience sample and Mechanical Turks. He is also working on finalising a Machine Learning pipeline to produce fully automated Opinion Polling from Twitter.
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Charles Rahal
Charles Rahal is a social science methodologist and applied social data scientist with a background in high-dimensional econometrics, having completed his PhD in 2016. He currently holds a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship entitled 'The Social Data Science of Healthcare Supply' which develops data driven tools for analysing healthcare procurement processes. He is particularly interested in unique data origination processes, be they unstructured or otherwise, and is an advocate for open source and reproducible academic research, particularly in the forms of Python, LaTeX and Linux. He was a co-recipient (with Aaron Reeves, Sam Friedman and Magne Flemmen) of the 2018 European Academy of Sociology Best Paper award, and he presently teaches 'Python for Sociologists' in Michaelmas Term. Other current areas of interest include civic technology, applied econometrics (predominantly spatial and time series), scientometrics, data wrangling, software development, and social stratification and social mobility. He is increasingly interested in sociological applications of text mining algorithms. Follow his projects on [github](https://github.com/crahal) and [Google Scholar](https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=8bd7KNgAAAAJ&hl=en)!
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Chris Barrie
Chris is currently a DPhil Candidate in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. From September 2019, he will be Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow in Sociology at Nuffield. His research interests include protest, conflict, and nationalism in the Middle East and North Africa. In the realm of computational methods, he is particularly interested in historical GIS techniques and the use of social media data.
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Samira Barzin
Samira Barzin is an Assistant Professor at the University of Groningen (The Netherlands). She holds a MSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science and has recently completed her PhD (Civil Eng.) at Imperial College London. Samira’s research particularly focuses on various topics of economic and international development, particularly its spatial and dynamic components, and transport economics. She is passionate about interdisciplinary work and curious about exploring the novel options big data and computational methods offer for research, particularly for research on data sparse developing countries.
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Pablo Beytía
Pablo Beytía is a PhD candidate at the Department of Social Sciences of Humboldt University of Berlin and a DAAD-CONICYT scholarship holder. He is specializing in what might be called ‘digital sociology of knowledge’, with a thesis on how biographical information is being globally structured in multilingual Wikipedia. Pablo was a lecturer at the Catholic University of Chile, director of the Social Research Centre of the international NGO ‘TECHO’, advisor to the Government of Chile, and visiting researcher at the University of Warwick and the Berlin Graduate School of Social Sciences. He is a sociologist and holds a master's degree in both sociology and philosophy.
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Jorge Cimentada
Jorge Cimentada is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Pompeu Fabra University and soon to be Research Scientist at the Max Planck Institute of Demography. He's involved in projects at the RECSM institute where he builds scientific software to analyze survey data with measurement error as well as on ERC funded projects from Bocconi University on trust and fertility. His research is focused on combining ideas from computer science and statistics to the study of achievement inequality, population dynamics and inequality in spatial/social mobility. To check out some of his work, you can visit his website or follow him on Twitter under @cimentadaj.
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Aidan Combs
Aidan is pursuing a PhD in Sociology at Duke University, where she is associated with the Polarization Lab and Duke Network Analysis Center. Her research interests are in the application of computational methods to questions in political sociology, social psychology, and the sociology of gender. She holds a BS in Engineering Physics and Mathematics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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Emmanuelle Afaribea Dankwa
Emmanuelle is a DPhil candidate in Statistical Science at the University of Oxford, where she studies as a Rhodes Scholar. Before moving to Oxford, she worked as a teaching assistant in the statistics department of the University of Ghana where she had earlier obtained a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and Statistics. Emmanuelle’s research interests lie in experimental design and statistical epidemiology and her current research explores the links between branching processes and the mechanisms of infectious disease spread in a stochastic environment. She is also interested in applying statistical methods to increase the impacts of environmental campaigns.
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Arran Davis
Arran recently finished his DPhil (PhD) at the Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford, where he was a Clarendon Scholar. He is now teaching quantitative methods at both the undergraduate and graduate level at Oxford, as well as working part time as a data scientist at TextureAI. Using evolutionary theory to understand human behaviour, he has studied the cultural activities that lead to bonded, cooperative relationships among humans. Arran's DPhil focused on the effects of social relationships on human health and wellbeing. Specifically, he used experimental, observational, and 'big data' approaches to understand how social support and cohesion can enhance the performance of physical exercise through reducing perceptions of pain and fatigue. Particularly relevant to the SICSS, he built social networks using data from over 10 million runs at parkrun (a free, weekly, community based 5 km run that happens at over 600 locations around the world) to demonstrate how the presence of close social relationships can improve run times and exercise adherence. Arran is excited to advance his (largely self taught) knowledge of the network sciences, web scrapping, Python, and R, especially with regard to how these methods and tools can be successfully applied to answering the challenges we face as a society.
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Xuejie Ding
Xuejie Ding is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Sociology at the University of Oxford, and a research fellow at Nuffield College. She receives her DPhil from the University of Oxford in 2018. Her research interests are primarily directed towards adopting a sociogenomic approach to bridge the knowledge on contextual, social and biological influences on health and behaviour outcomes. She is particularly interested in applying computational methods to large-scale genetic and behavioural data to understand gene-environment interaction and correlation.
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Arun Frey
Arun Frey is currently pursuing a PhD in Sociology at the University of Oxford. His research examines the ecologies of ethnic conflict and discrimination during the “European refugee crisis”, studying how threatening events shape patterns of violence, discrimination, and political polarisation. Methodologically, he is very interested in high-frequency data and text analysis, and uses computational social science approaches to identify novel data sources and quantify local anti-immigrant sentiment. Prior to commencing his doctoral research, Arun worked as a social affairs consultant at the United Nations Secretariat in Bangkok, Thailand.
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Clemens Jarnach
Clemens is a DPhil candidate in Sociology at Green Templeton College, University of Oxford. His recent research focuses on the application of social network analysis to political sociology topics. His thesis focuses on investigating digital media usage by voters and politicians in British politics. His research addresses topics such as political polarization, echo chambers, Brexit, and media diversity.
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Adam Kenny
Adam Kenny is a DPhil candidate in Anthropology at the University of Oxford. His doctoral research focuses on the effects of group identity and intergroup competition on human prosociality. He mostly analyses quantitative data generated through field experiments employing behavioural economic games. He also holds a BA in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge and an MSc in Human Evolution and Behaviour from University College London.
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Rishemjit Kaur
Rishemjit Kaur recently completed her PhD in utilizing the optimization capabilities of human decision making process by understanding their conflicting integrative and individualisation tendencies. She is currently working as a Scientist at CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, India. Her research interests include the study of human behaviour, particularly moral behaviour and understanding the inter-cultural differences or similarities using social media data. She is also interested in studying the effects of policy decisions on specific groups, e.g. farmers using big data sources such as "Farmers Call Centre queries" and provide solutions in order to alleviate some of the problems they face.
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Judith Koops
Judith Koops is a PhD candidate at the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute in The Hague (The Netherlands). Her research focusses on cross-national differences in the link between childhood disadvantage and family formation of young adults. Judith also works as a researcher for the Generations and Gender Programme (GGP). The GGP is a social science research infrastructure that provides open access micro- and macro-level data with the aim to improve the knowledge base for social science and policymaking in developed, low-fertility, countries. GGP is currently examining the outcomes of a Push-to-Web experiment in three European countries and they will soon conduct a Social Media experiment using the Facebook advertising platform. In 2019, the team will develop infrastructure needed to collect voice recordings during CAPI or CAWI administered interviews of the Generations and Gender Survey.
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Kan Li
Kan Li is a DPhil candidate in international relations at University of Oxford. Her research focuses on applications of agent-based model to international crises and conflicts; her current project studies how challengers alter international status quo through asymmetric military build-up and how this shapes unique dynamics of asymmetric conflicts. Prior to Oxford, she received her Master's degree in political science from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and her Bachelor's degree in economics from the University of Hong Kong.
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Timothy Monteath
Timothy Monteath is a PhD student in the Sociology Department at the London School of Economics and is also Researcher in the Department of Law. His doctoral research is focused on the high end of London’s residential property market, and looks at questions of value, ownership and property relations. He maintains a broad interest in broad area housing studies, wealth, inequality and the application of computational methods to research in this area.
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Julia Mikolai
Julia Mikolai is a Research Fellow at the University of St Andrews. Her background is in sociology and demography. Her research interests include partnerships, families, and fertility; residential mobility and housing; life course research; and cross-national comparisons. She uses individual-level longitudinal data and longitudinal methods to study these topics. Previously, she has been a Post-doctoral Research Associate at the University of Liverpool. She holds a PhD in social statistics and demography from the University of Southampton and has studied at Eötvös Loránd University (Budapest), Utrecht University, and the European Doctoral School of Demography (hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research and the Centre for Economic Demography at Lund University).
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Tobias Rüttenauer
Tobias Rüttenauer completed his PhD in sociology at the University of Kaiserslautern, where he is currently working as a postdoctoral research assistant. In his research, he uses large-scale register-based data to analyse the connection between socio-demographic characteristics and the exposure to environmental pollution, with a particular focus on selective migration processes. He is also working on econometric models for spatial and longitudinal data analysis, and recently published the R package feisr to estimate fixed effects individual slope models.
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Florian Schaffner
Florian Schaffner is a doctoral student in Politics at Balliol College, University of Oxford. His research interests include political psychology, direct democracy, elections, research methods and data science. In his doctoral research he uses surveys, experiments and quantitative text analysis to study the determinants and consequences of citizens’ perceptions of the integrity and legitimacy of referendums and elections. He holds an MSc in Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and a BA in Social Sciences from the University of Zurich.
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Kayla Schulte
Kayla Schulte is a PGS with the Department of Sociology and the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science at the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on air pollution exposure, inequality, health-protective behaviours and open-access air quality data. Kayla worked previously with the U.S. EPA on air quality and citizen science research, and is now involved with DEFRA-funded research on air quality management in Oxford city. Kayla has a background in social science, politics, human geography and graphic design. She received her BA from Franklin & Marshall College and her MSc from the University of Oxford.
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Giacomo Vagni
Giacomo is a DPhil candidate in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford and a member of the Centre for Time Use Research, University College London. His PhD thesis focuses on the structure of daily life, collective rhythms and the social stratification of time use. His research interests include causal inference, sequence analysis and visual sociology. He holds a BA in Anthropology and Sociology from the Université Libre de Bruxelles and a MA in Sociology from the University of Geneva.
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Fjinanda van Klingeren
I am DPhil student in Sociology at Nuffield College, researching heterogeneity, trust and cooperation in common pool resource settings. I use laboratory and artefactual field experiments with common pool resource games to analyse human behaviour under different treatments. I'm also interested in agent-based models to analyse behaviour, and hope to apply this to my research.
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Mark Verhagen
Mark Verhagen is an incoming PhD student in Sociology at Nuffield college. He holds Masters in Econometrics (University of Amsterdam) and Sociology (University of Oxford) and is interested in incorporating exciting new quantitative techniques into social science research. Mark has been active in the past years as a data scientist through his companies Delph and Apadana.io, working for municipalities, SME's, research institutes and large corporations to make data an intrinsic part of their business strategy. Academically, his more recent work has focused on law, building large databases of court cases through web scraping and using Machine Learning and NLP techniques to identify determinants of court rulings.
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Vadim Voskresenskii
Vadim Voskresenskii is doing PhD in Free University of Berlin and working as a research assistant in Weizenbaum Institute for the Networked Society. His research is focused on how right-wing actors use the affordances of social media platforms for the creation of transnational ties and exchange of information. In the current project, he studies online communities formed by European right-wingers migrating to Russian social media due to the censorship policy on Facebook. In the project, he uses text mining and network analysis methods.

ETH Zurich

All Participants


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Elliott Ash
Elliott Ash is Assistant Professor at ETH Zurich Department of Social Sciences, where he chairs the Law, Economics, and Data Science Group. Professor Ash's research undertakes empirical analysis of law and political economy, with methods drawn from applied microeconometrics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Professor Ash was previously Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Warwick, and before that a Postdoctoral Research Associate at Princeton University. He received a PhD in economics and JD from Columbia University, a BA in economics, government, and philosophy from University of Texas at Austin, and an LLM in international criminal law from University of Amsterdam.
Website
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Elena Labzina
Elena is a postdoctoral associate in the Law, Economics, and Data Science Group in the Lab of Law & Economics at ETH Zurich. Elena works on the intersection between causal inference and machine learning in the context of the political media and its effects. Recently, her work has been focused on natural language processing. She is an enthusiastic proponent of computational social science in general. In 2018, she received her Ph.D. in political science and MA in statistics at Washington University in Saint Louis. Also, she holds MAs in political science from Central European University in Budapest and economics from New Economic School in Moscow. Her undergraduate degree in Applied Math and Computer Science is from Moscow State University.
Website
Live Stream
Matt Salganik, Chris Bail, more coming soon.
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Dirk Helbing
Dirk Helbing is Professor of Computational Social Science at the Department of Humanities, Social and Political Sciences and affiliate of the Computer Science Department at ETH Zurich. In January 2014 Prof. Helbing received an honorary PhD from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft). Since June 2015 he is affiliate professor at the faculty of Technology, Policy and Management at TU Delft, where he leads the PhD school in 'Engineering Social Technologies for a Responsible Digital Future'. He won various prizes, including the Idee Suisse Award. He co-founded the Competence Center for Coping with Crises in Complex Socio-Economic Systems, the Risk Center, the Institute for Science, Technology and Policy (ISTP) and the Decision Science Laboratory (DeSciL). While coordinating the FuturICT initiative, he helped to establish data science and computational social science in Europe, as well as global systems science.
Website
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Dominik Hangartner
Dominik Hangartner is an Associate Professor of public policy and faculty co-director of the Immigration Policy Lab. After pre-doctoral fellowships at Harvard University, Washington University in Saint Louis, and the University of California, Berkeley, Dominik received his Ph.D. in social science from the University of Bern in 2011. In the same year, he joined the London School of Economics as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to tenured Associate Professor in 2013, before joining ETH in 2017. Dominik uses field work and statistics to study the effects of migration policies and political institutions. His work has been published in leading scholarly journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Science, and has received several awards including the Philip Leverhulme Prize.
Website
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Christoph Stadtfeld
Christoph Stadtfeld is Assistant Professor of Social Networks at ETH Zürich, Switzerland. He holds a PhD from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and has been postdoctoral researcher and Marie-Curie fellow at the University of Groningen, the Social Network Analysis Research Center in Lugano, and the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on the development and application of theories and methods for social network dynamics.
Website
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Roger Wattenhofer
Roger Wattenhofer is a full professor at the Information Technology and Electrical Engineering Department, ETH Zurich, Switzer­land. He received his doctorate in Computer Science from ETH Zurich. He also worked some years at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. Roger Wattenhofer’s research interests are a variety of algorithmic and systems aspects in computer science and information technology, e.g., distributed systems, positioning systems, wireless networks, mobile systems, social networks, deep neural networks.
Website
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Kornélia Papp
Kornélia Papp is a senior data scientist at Swiss Re. She holds a PhD in Cognitive Semantics and has over 10 years' experience in building and managing analytics capabilities in legaltech, e-commerce and the automotive industry. She is the founder of the NLP Zurich group, an AI-driven language technology focused event series in Switzerland. Her current work focuses on document understanding solutions using rule-based programming, machine learning and deep learning techniques. She previously worked on several projects developing language technology applications in the area of speech technology, machine translation, fraud detection and natural language generation.
Website
More Speakers To Be Announced

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Alessandra Stampi-Bombelli
Alessandra Stampi-Bombelli is a Research Assistant at University of Zurich’s Chair of Political Economy of Development. She received a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Roma Tre and a M.Sc. in Economics from the University of Lausanne in 2017. This summer she will be starting a PhD at ETH Zurich, jointly with the Center for Law & Economics, the Public Policy Group and the Immigration Policy Lab. Her PhD will focus broadly on applying machine learning techniques to topics of empirical economics and policy and, in particular, on migration. She is currently working on a project that assesses the effect of immigrant group size on integration during the period of Mass Migration in the US. Her research interests include migration economics and policy, identity and integration, and behavioral development economics.
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Elena Fernandez
Originally from Spain, Elena Fernandez is a PhD student in Hispanic Languages and Literatures at the University of California, Berkeley. Her current research profile incorporates Intellectual History, Cultural Studies, and History of Ideas. She is expanding her research interests to the fields of Cultural Analytics, Culturomics, Computational Social Sciences, Digital Humanities, and Natural Language Processing. She is presently working on a research project that aims to quantify mutations of the social construction of time by relating technological advancements and information fluctuation in the printed press of several countries.
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Roza Kamiloglu
Roza is a PhD candidate in psychology at University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Her research focuses on vocal expression and perception of emotions using wide range of methods including cross-cultural comparisons. Her interests include evolutionary origins of emotional vocalizations and computational models of acoustic patterns of emotional information across species and cultures. She completed a double major in physics and psychology, followed by a master’s degree in social psychology.
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Kieran Mepham
Kieran Mepham is a PhD student in the Social Networks Lab at ETH Zürich, with a BSc in social psychology and MSc in interdisciplinary social science from Utrecht University. His research interests include the development of culture, group formation, and opinion polarization, focusing on the micro-macro perspectives of these issues in networks. He currently explores these topics using traditional and novel data-gathering and analytic methods.
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Arto Kekkonen
Arto Kekkonen is a doctoral candidate at the University of Helsinki's Faculty of Social Sciences. He is currently researching the relationship between political polarization and social media, with a specific focus on affective polarization and ingroup-outgroup dynamics. Arto has a background in media and communication studies and computer science and is broadly interested in how computational methods could be better used to answer theoretically interesting questions in social sciences.
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Germain Gauthier
Germain is a doctoral student in Economics at Ecole Polytechnique, CREST. He holds an MSc in Business Administration from HEC Paris and an MSc in Economics from the Paris School of Economics. He is interested in the formation, persistence and unravelling of social norms and of beliefs. Relying on social networks, surveys and administrative data, his main focus has been on the evolution of gender norms. More broadly, any topic related to political economy is likely to arouse his curiosity.
Image of Moritz Hoferer
Moritz Hoferer
Moritz Hoferer is a PhD candidate in Economics at ETH Zurich. His research is about Political Campaigns on Complex Networks. In particular, he concentrates on theoretical modeling of opinion formation as well as analyzing campaign related data. Before, he studied Physics at LMU Munich and University of Milan focusing on Theoretical Biophysics.
Website
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Gabrielle Mantell
Gabrielle Mantell is a master's student in European and Nordic Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her current research focuses on the use of computational and memetic propaganda within the context of global politics. She holds a MA in Science and Security from King’s College London and a BA in International Relations from Mount Holyoke College. Gabrielle’s research interests include computational international relations, machine learning and geopolitics.
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Valentina Rizzoli
Valentina is a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Health Awareness and Communication, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie (Legnaro, Padua). She received her Ph.D. in Social Sciences and her M.Sc. in Social, Communication, and Work Psychology at the University of Padua. In her dissertation she applied and compared computational text analyses to chronological corpora pertaining scientific literature to portray the history of a discipline. She is currently involved in various research projects on risk communication. Her research interests include qualitative and quantitative methods in social psychology, particularly, computational text analyses applied to social issues. Main topics treated: food risk communication, history of social psychology, economic crisis, ageing.
Image of Philine Widmer
Philine Widmer
Philine is a second-year Ph.D. student in Economics at the University of St. Gallen. Her research interests include media, political, and development economics. In particular, she studies news reporting in the digital age, relying on web-mining approaches to describe which kinds of players and contents dominate news flows around the world and how they depend on institutions.
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George Boateng
George Boateng is a PhD candidate and doctoral researcher doing applied machine learning research at the Center for Digital Health Interventions at ETH Zurich in Switzerland. He is currently developing a smartwatch-based emotion recognition algorithm for chronic disease management among romantic couples. His research interests are at the intersection of machine learning, mobile health, and wearable computing. He seeks to develop AI-powered mobile and wearable health apps that leverage sensor data to improve the health of people. He is also the Cofounder and President of Nsesa Foundation, an education nonprofit whose vision is to spur an Innovation Revolution in Africa. George has a B.A. in Computer Science and an M.S. in Computer Engineering, both from Dartmouth College in the U.S.
Image of Karen Nershi
Karen Nershi
Karen Nershi is a PhD candidate in political science at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests lie at the intersection of international political economy and conflict, and she is particularly interested in the economic factors that drive conflict and the economic consequences of conflict and organized crime. Her dissertation examines how private financial sector interests affect countries’ enforcement of anti-money laundering laws. Before coming to Penn, Karen earned a bachelor’s degree in international studies at the University of Alabama.
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Laura White
Laura White is a third year Ph.D. student in the Politics Department at the University of Virginia, specializing in international relations and quantitative methodology. Her research interests focus on questions of reputation formation, public opinion and the electoral cycle, the role of leaders in international relations, and how states strategically interact with the domestic politics of adversaries and allies. She is especially interested in applying these themes to US-Russian relations, both past and present. Prior to attending UVA, Laura received an M.A. in Political Science from Georgia State University and a B.A. in Political Science and International Affairs from the University of Georgia.
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Cantay Caliskan
Cantay Caliskan is an Assistant Professor of Data Analytics at Denison University in Granville, Ohio. His research focuses on social media, political communication, lobbying, and policymaking. He uses network analysis, text analysis, visualization, and machine learning to understand how the diffusion of ideas and the distribution of political money shape and complicate the way people engage in politics.
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Anastasia Voloshina
Anastasia received the Master of Science degree at the Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Lomonosov State University in Moscow. Now she works as a graphic designer and visual artist in Berlin, finishing her second education, Visual Communication, at the Weissensee Academy of Art Berlin, after studying Graphic Design at British Higher School of Art and Design Moscow and Hertfordshire University, as well as Digital Arts at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. She was being exhibited in Moscow, Berlin and Vienna. At the moment Anastasia is developing her project on metadata portraits, at the same time she illustrates social aspects of everyday life in Berlin, works on visualisations for other various projects and her research on interface design project at the Fachhochschule Potsdam, University of Applied Sciences.
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Saddaf Naaz Akhtar
I am a Ph.D. student in the field of Population Studies at Centre for the Study of Regional Development, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India. I received M.Sc. in Statistics and Computing from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi and Master of Population Studies from International Institute for Population Sciences (I.I.P.S.), Mumbai, India. My research broadly focuses in combining computational methods with large-scale datasets to study demography and public health phenomena with a particular emphasis on mortality, aging, and health, specifically the methodological challenges, gender differential in mortality, as well as in the lifespan inequality, healthy aging and longevity in mortality studies. Cumulatively, my research work contributes to the fields of computational social science and public health policymaking.
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Marco Ramljak
Marco Ramljak is currently working as a Geospatial Data Analyst at the consultancy Ramboll, carrying out evaluations for the public sector. Being placed in the Social and Economic Impact unit, Marco utilizes contrafactual and spatial analysis methods in projects concerning regional development as well as labor market integration. His current research interests span across developing economic smart specialization strategies for regions and cities, by drawing on ideas from economic and knowledge complexity, using network analysis as well as geographic agent-based modeling. He holds a BA in Political Science from Zeppelin University in Germany where, in his Bachelor Thesis, he scrutinized the importance of municipal politics and elections on state and federal elections, using a regression discontinuity design. In September 2019 he wants to continue his master studies in the field of social science research methods and statistics.
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Carolin Nast
Carolin Nast is a Research Master student in Urban and Economic Geography at Utrecht University. She is interested in applying complexity theory and system thinking to the city context, more specifically to the process of developing public policy in response to current challenges we are facing. Using this theoretical lens, Carolin’s Master thesis focuses on revealing the interconnectedness among the Sustainable Development Goals, using machine learning and network analysis. Carolin received her Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Zeppelin University in Germany and currently works as a Teaching Assistant at the Vitality Data Centre of Utrecht University.
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Lukas Fesenfeld
Lukas Fesenfeld is a PhD student at the chair of international relations and political economy at ETH Zurich. He previously studied at the University College Maastricht, the University of Seville, and the Hertie School of Governance. His main research interests lie in the field of (international) environmental governance, political economy and political psychology. His dissertation concentrates on the political feasibility of ambitious climate policies. Lukas is particularly interested in the nexus of food and climate policy. He has conducted several large-scale survey-embedded experiments to study public support for policies reducing the climate impact of the food sector. Methodologically, Lukas is especially interested into experimental methods (survey/field experiments), event-history analysis, social network analysis, machine learning and mixed method approaches including qualitative interviews, focus groups and process tracing. His academic work has been supported by the German Academic Foundation and the Heinrich Boell Foundation.
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Romina Jafaryanyazdi
Romina studies Master of Computer Science at ETH Zurich. She is also Research Assistant at Law, Economics, and Data Science Group in the Lab of Law & Economics at ETH Zurich. She works on Natural language processing. Previously she was Research Assistant at Automated Software Engineering Laboratory in Computer Engineering Department at Sharif University of Technology. Also, she worked in Sharif E-commerce & E-government Research & Innovation Office. Generally, she is interested in Data mining, Machine learning, Natural language processing, and text Analysis. She did her Bachelor in Software Engineering at Sharif University of Technology.

University of California at Los Angeles

All Participants


Image of Friedolin Merhout
Friedolin Merhout
Friedolin Merhout is a doctoral student in the Duke Sociology department. He enjoys exploring how computational methods provide a new lens to view longstanding social science debates, and pondering the potential inherent in the wealth of digital trace data. Before starting the doctoral program at Duke, he earned a BA from Freie Universitaet in his hometown Berlin.
Website
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Alina Arseniev-Koehler
Alina Arseniev-Koehler is currently a graduate student at the University of California Los Angeles pursuing a PhD in Sociology. Substantively, her research interests include culture, cognitive sociology, language, and health and illness. Methodologically, she is interested in computational social science and machine-learning, with a focus on the computational analysis of language. Her Master’s research aimed to provide a cognitively plausible, computational account of the schemata activated by news reporting on obesity. Alina also enjoys learning and teaching new computational techniques and helps coordinate the Computational Sociology Working Group at UCLA.
Website
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Jennie E. Brand
Jennie E. Brand is Professor of Sociology and Statistics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is Director of the California Center for Population Research (CCPR) and Co-Director of the Center for Social Statistics (CSS) at UCLA. She is Chair-Elect of the Methodology Section of the American Sociological Association (ASA) and an elected Board Member of the International Sociological Association (ISA) Research Committte on Social Stratification and Mobility (RC28). Prof. Brand is a member of the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey (GSS) and a member of the Technical Review Committee for the National Longitudinal Surveys Program at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. She received the ASA Methodology Leo Goodman Mid-Career Award in 2016, and honorable mention for the ASA Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility William Julius Wilson Mid-Career Award in 2014. Prof. Brand studies social stratification and inequality, mobility, social demography, education, and methods for causal inference.
Website
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Pablo Geraldo Bastías
Pablo Geraldo Bastías is a graduate student at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) affiliated to the California Center for Population Research (CCPR). His research examines how institutions influence inequality in education and the labor market, with a particular focus on skill formation systems and school-to-work transitions. He is interested in the intersection of causality, machine learning, and network analysis.
Website
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Bernard Koch
Bernard is a sociology graduate student at UCLA. He developed research interests in culture, science, and computational methods through previous experiences in comparative genomics/bioinformatics and science education research. His master's thesis adapted models from macroevolutionary biology to explain the historical trajectories of cultural populations like music genres, scientific fields, and industries. For his dissertation, he'd like to focus on how deep learning can be applied to network and causal inference problems to help identify how we can make science more efficient, productive, and equitable. Bernard is passionate about collaborative science and teaching, and has given workshops on programming, machine learning, and/or computational social science for the National Human Genome Research Institute (NIH), the UCLA Library, and the UCLA Sociology Department.
Website
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Tim Dennis
Tim Dennis is the Director of the UCLA Library Data Science Center where he provides data science support, including instruction, one-on-one consulting, and community building. He is a regular user of R, Python, SQL and command-line tools and has extensive experience helping researchers and students with these tools. He's also an instructor with The Carpentries, a global volunteer run educational community that teaches foundational coding and data science skills to researchers.
Website
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Dennis Feehan
Dennis Feehan is a demographer and quantitative social scientist whose research interests lie at the intersection of networks, demography, and quantitative methodology. He is an Assistant Professor of Demography at the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the demography department at Berkeley, he received his Ph.D. at Princeton’s Office of Population Research and worked as a Research Scientist at Facebook.
Website
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Erin Hartman
Erin Hartman is an Assistant Professor of Statistics and Political Science at UCLA. Her recent research focuses on creating new methods–including both theoretical approaches and new estimation strategies–for identifying and validating causal effects. She also studies survey design methodologies, including a new survey sampling method that reduces reliance on post hoc weighting methods and alleviates non-response bias, and an automated raking methodology that selects the optimal auxiliary vector on which to weight.
Website
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Jungseock Joo
Jungseock Joo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received is Ph.D. in Computer Science from UCLA in 2015 and worked as a Research Scientist at Facebook before returning to UCLA to join the Department of Communication.
Website
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Ka-Yuet Liu
Ka-Yuet Liu is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, UCLA, whose research mostly focuses on the intersections between social network analysis and social epidemiology. She received her D.Phil. (Sociology) in 2008 from the University of Oxford and completed a post-doc at Columbia University before joining UCLA as a faculty member in 2012.
Website
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Judea Pearl
Judea Pearl is a computer scientist and philosopher, best known for championing the probabilistic approach to artificial intelligence and the development of Bayesian networks. He is credited for developing a theory of causal and counterfactual inference based on structural models. He is the 2011 winner of the ACM Turing Award, the highest distinction in computer science.
Website
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Sam Pimentel
Sam Pimentel is an Assistant Professor in the Statistics Department at UC Berkeley. His research centers on methodology for causal inference in observational studies. He develops new ways to form matched comparison groups in large observational datasets using approaches from discrete optimization. These tools allow transparent and interpretable inferences about the effects of interventions, and provide opportunities to study the impact of potential unobserved confounding variables. He is also interested in applying these methods in health services research, public policy, and the social sciences.
Website
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Zachary C. Steinert-Threlkeld
Zachary C. Steinert-Threlkeld is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. His research interests are at the border of international and comparative politics, exploiting in particular vast social media data to study subnational conflict. His current research focuses on the mobilization of mass protest during the Arab Spring and Ukraine’s Euromaidan protests, as well as elite behavior and state repression in authoritarian regimes.
Website
Live Stream and Lectures
Christ Bail, Justin Grimmer, Alondra Nelson, Beth Noveck, Matt Salganik, and Chris Wiggins
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Caitlin Ahearn
Caitlin Ahearn is a doctoral student in Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on the sources and consequences of inequality in educational attainment. For her master’s thesis she studied the sources of alignment of educational and career expectations among adolescents, and her dissertation will examine the effects of differential college experiences on the transition to adulthood. She is interested in applications of causal inference, particularly heterogeneity in causal effects and causal mediation analyses, using large-scale survey data. Caitlin is also an affiliate of the California Center for Population Research and a research assistant for the Los Angeles Education Research Institute.
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Mohammad Atari
Mohammad is a Ph.D. student in social psychology at USC. He uses experimental, psychometric, and computational methods to study personality and morality. He takes an evolutionary perspective to examine cross-cultural differences and similarities in human behavior and its portrayal in social media.
Website
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Bonnie Bui
Bonnie Bui is a postdoctoral research fellow for the Center for Studies of Displaced Populations in the Department of Global Community Health & Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University’s School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine. Her interests are in population health and aging using social network analysis and demographic analytical methods. Her current work focuses on immigrant and refugee health, focusing on how displacement impacts health and well-being through disruption of personal social support networks.
Website
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Osman Celik
Osman Celik is pursuing Ph.D. in Political Science at UCLA. His research includes survey data, online political information, and voter behavior and currently focuses on explaining foreign policy change via political psychology of policy-makers and voters. He is using mixed methods - process tracing, textual analysis of foreign policy-makers' public speeches, and experimental survey of voters' perception of foreign policy - to study and explain foreign policy changes of emerging state actors in regional and global politics.
Website
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Kristine Chan
Kristine Chan is a social worker and a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Her research focuses on the juvenile justice system, particularly the experiences of juvenile reentry youth and factors related to recidivism and improving outcomes. She is interested in integrating technology in data collection and using programming to expand research methods.
Catherine Choe
Catherine Choe is a 2nd year PhD student in Higher Education and Organizational Change at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Prior to the program, she received her master's degree in Educational Counseling from USC, as well as bachelor's degrees in English and Art History from UC Berkeley. Catherine currently works as a Counselor at El Camino College and as a College Academic Mentor at UCLA, and she has previously worked in first year experience programs, disability services, career centers, and writing centers at 2- and 4-year institutions. Catherine's research interests focus on organizational theory, community colleges, and faculty and administrators of postsecondary institutions.
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Hanyu Chwe
Hanyu is an incoming second-year PhD student at the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University. He graduated with a degree in Economics and Political Science from Swarthmore College in 2016, and then worked for the Global Attitudes team at the Pew Research Center before starting his PhD. He is broadly interested in computational social science, natural language processing, and exploring the interdisciplinary nature of network science.
Angela Clague
I am a second year Sociology PhD student interested in health trauma. In addition to my graduate studies, I also work as a Program Analyst the West LA VA Medical Center. Prior to coming to graduate school, I worked as a Research Assistant for two years at the RAND Corporation.
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Sarah Cooney
Sarah Cooney is a second year PhD student in Computer Science at the University of Southern California. Her research interest is in the intersection of technology and computing for social good.
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Cody Couture
I am currently a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine pursuing a PhD in economics. Broadly speaking, my research investigates the interaction between monetary policy and financial markets. In my recent work, I have been examining the impact that central bank communication, particularly that of the Federal Reserve, has on market expectations. I hope to pursue future research using textual analysis in order to better quantify central bank communication and market feedback.
Image of Aline Duarte Folle
Aline Duarte Folle
Aline is currently a PhD candidate in Epidemiology, studying potential causes and effects of sleep problems in Parkinson's disease. She is from Brazil, where she was a local pharmacist working and researching in the area of Pharmaceutical Services within different levels of care of the Brazilian Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). Her research interests lie in evaluating general risks factors and promoters of health, focusing on the older adult population, with the goal of improving health indicators within this group.
Website
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Mai ElSherief
Mai ElSherief is a 5th year Ph.D. candidate at the Computer Science department at UC, Santa Barbara within the Mobility Management and Networking (MOMENT) Lab, advised by Elizabeth Belding and William Wang. Her research interests lie in the intersection of Social Computing, Natural Language Processing, and Online Social Networks, specifically causes of social good. Her Ph.D. thesis focuses on developing computational methods for improving the detection and characterization of online hate speech and communities of hate in addition to characterizing offline street harassment and online anti-gender-based violence social movements. She has been a summer research intern at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University understanding anti-immigration sentiment and the discursive practices of online hate groups. She was awarded the 2017 Fiona and Michael Goodchild Graduate mentoring award for her distinguished research mentoring of undergraduate students. Prior to entering the field of Social Computing, she earned her M.Sc. in the area of Wireless Communication and Information Technology from Nile University, Egypt. Funded by a Google Research Award, she devised novel Information-theoretic models for Opportunistic Mobile Social Networks. She is the recipient of both the IEEE best project award for the Cairo University Student Branch (CUSB) and the Ideal student award for Cairo University in 2009.
Website
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Ross Graham
Ross Graham is a first year PhD student in sociology at the University of California, San Diego. Before attending UCSD, he completed a BA in anthropology from Durham University, an MS in sustainability studies from Lipscomb University, and worked as a researcher in the Centre for Biomedical Ethics and Society at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. His research interests span the sociology of science and technology, ethics, intelligence and cognition, big data and existential risk.
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Wanyang Hu
Wanyang Hu is an Assistant Professor of Public Administration (tenure track) at the University of Macau. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of California Los Angeles in 2018, a M.S. and a B.E. from Tsinghua University in 2013 and 2010, and a B.A. in Economics from Peking University in 2012 (double major degree). Her research focuses on urban and regional development, particularly the intersection between urban policy, labor mobility, and economic development. She also works on housing market analysis and housing policy. She is a quantitative researcher with extensive experience in large-data set computing. She is especially interested in spatial econometrics, discrete choice modelling, models with latent variables and causal inference.
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Ryan Hyon
Ryan is an incoming PhD student in UCLA's Psychology program. He received his BA in Neuroscience at Dartmouth College and has spent the past two years as a research associate in Dr. Carolyn Parkinson's Computational Social Neuroscience Lab. Broadly, he integrates neuroimaging and social network analysis to study how we shape and are shaped by the social networks that we inhabit. His recent work has involved using machine learning to identify multivariate signatures of neural activity across the brain that are predictive of individuals' real-world social network characteristics. He is also interested in studying how individual differences in the use of language and in interpretations of narratives may relate to meaningful individual differences in neural activity and social network position. Ryan is particularly excited to learn about text analysis!
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Linle Jiang
I am a first-year PhD student in the Social Psychology Program at USC. I am interested in using computational methods to systematically investigate and model the effects of individual and contextual factors on human decision-making processes and behaviors, based on the natural data collected from social media.
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Jay Kao
I am a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. My research interests include politics in authoritarian regimes, disinformation, political communication, Chinese politics, causal inference, as well as political economy of development.
Website
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Alexander Kwako
As a third year PhD student in education, I am broadly interested in social research methodology and how research can be used to understand and improve educational systems, particularly for underrepresented and marginalized students. Currently, at UCLA's Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access, I am analyzing a national survey of high school principals' civic leadership beliefs and practices. One civic leadership practice that we are examining is principals’ school-wide communication of racial and religious tolerance, and what leverage points exist for supporting this kind of communication at public high schools.
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Tianjian Lai
I am a 3rd year PhD student in sociology at UCLA interested in examining the stratifying effects of immigration policy, in particular legal status categories, on the social, economic, and political lives of immigrants and their children. My MA thesis examined how legal status shapes the civic participation of Latino immigrants in Los Angeles. I hope to apply computational methods to impute legal status when such measures are not fully available, gain familiarity with new data sources and data collection methods, and disentangle the causal effects of legal status acquisition.
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Jihye Lee
Jihye Lee graduated from Yonsei university with a double major in computer industrial engineering and psychology. After graduating from Yonsei university, she received an M.A. in criminal justice at SUNY-Albany. Her research interests are family and child development, social network, and criminology. Prior to her admission to the USC, her academic work focused on criminal justice issues and appeared in academic journals such as the International Criminal Justice Review and Criminal Law Bulletin. Her master’s thesis in Sociology examines how U.S. family values embedded in non-immigration policies (re)shape the lives of spouses of international students from gender and social class perspectives. Her dissertation focuses on U.S. adolescents’ friendship networks and the effects of their friendship networks on educational inequality and behaviors.
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Joyce Lui
Joyce Lui is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology at UCLA. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Washington State University. Joyce's research has focused on the precipitating factors, correlates, and outcomes of youth with conduct problems and psychopathic traits. She is extending this research to focus on optimizing the provision and coordination of evidence-based mental health services for youth with persistent conduct problems.
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Jinwen Luo
Jinwen is a first-year Ph.D. student studying advanced quantitative methods at the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He is interested in learning behaviors and how they impact students' learning outcomes under the schooling contexts. His current research includes jointly modeling different measurements of human abilities and the skills in schools. The techniques he is using include item response theory (IRT) models, network analysis, cross-classified models.
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Patricia Martin
Patricia Martin is a current graduate student at UCLA in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies in the Higher Education and Organizational Change program. Her research interests broadly include college access, organizational behavior, and university admissions and recruitment practices. Specifically, her research examines the unequal university recruitment practices that disproportionately create barriers to college access for underrepresented students. She is interested in using mixed-methodology including ethnography, geospatial analysis, and machine learning.
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Oscar Mayorga
Prior to his graduate studies at UCLA, he has worked in various capacities in higher education institutions for the last fifteen years in the Northeast, where he was the director of a cross-cultural center and chief diversity officer. Oscar is earning his Ph.D. in Sociology with subfield specialty in race and ethinicty, economic sociology and quantitative methods. His focus is on identifying the social mechanism by which racial ideologies are embedded in markets and perceptions of the economy, at large.
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Galen Murray
I’m interested in how corruption and criminal elements impede (or facilitate) public service delivery. My dissertation uses a regression discontinuity design to estimate the causal impact of 'criminal' politicians on the delivery of state resources to citizens in India. To flesh out how local politicians influence benefit delivery, I study the geospatial distribution of the world's largest welfare program (NREGS in India). Specifically, I'm interested in how local politicians target their supporters by mapping the location of 20 million welfare projects to micro-levels of political support (estimated from polling station level results). I complement this quantitative research with over 12 months of on the ground interviews, with politicians, activists and local leaders in Bihar, India. Quantitatively, I’m interested in causal inference using observational data.
Website
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Kaye Nantah
Kaye Nantah is a second-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology at Cornell University. She is interested in the expression and formation of racial-ethnic identities, especially among second-generation immigrants. Having double majored in psychology and sociology at the University of Houston, she hopes to blend elements of demography, cultural sociology, and social psychology as well as to work at the junction between the race and immigration literatures.
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Gwen Price
Gwen Price is a 3rd year doctoral student in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research focuses on language acquisition in infancy and childhood. In particular, she is interested in the effect that learning tools like comparison, contrast, and spacing have on children’s ability to construct categories, learn labels for them, and remember them for a lifetime.
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Alejandra Regla-Vargas
Alejandra Regla-Vargas is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her broad research interests are in social movements, immigration, and digital sociology. Prior to her graduate studies, she received a B.A. in Chicana/o Studies from California State University, Dominguez Hills.
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Julius Rüschenpöhler
Julius is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Effective Global Action at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his PhD in Economics from Tilburg University and was a visiting research student at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Julius' work lies at the intersection of Development and Behavioural Economics. He is interested in the psychology of poverty, individual decision-making, culture and identity economics, as well as work on the deep roots of development. In his research, Julius' has worked with micro- and small enterprises in Indonesia and Vietnam and on peer learning, aspirations, small-business growth, and business practices.
Website
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Pietro Spini
I'm an Italian student pursuing a PhD in Econometrics at UCSD. After getting my bachelor in Italy, I obtained a Masters in Economics from Cornell University. In my current research I focus on robustness procedures for the estimation of causal effects when identifying assumptions are doubted. In my applied work, I am interested in coupling data and nonparametric methods to inform effective policy making in public health. Lately, I have been curious to learn more about how price transparency in the health sector effects consumers' choice of provider. In my spare time I enjoy reading, chatting about math and philosophy and practicing martial arts.
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Carmella N. Stoddard
Carmella is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at UCLA. Her interests include social networks, computational methods, culture, social psychology, and sociological theory. Her dissertation examines normative behavioral constraints as scope conditions of romantic and sexual relationship networks. Using Add Health and an original dataset of celebrity dating ties, she explores structural interactions between norms of partner selection and network processes such as homophily and multiplexity. Carmella holds a B.A. in American Studies and Ethnicity from the University of Southern California and an M.A. in Communication from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
Website
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John Sullivan
John Sullivan is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at UCLA. He is also the Administrator of the UCLA branch of the US Census Bureau’s Federal Statistical Research Data Center network. His research focuses on segregation, residential mobility and neighborhood change. He is particularly interested in how individual age and population age distribution contour these phenomena. His recent work uses longitudinal data on the age distribution of American neighborhoods to identify patterns of population succession. With federal and academic collaborators, he also uses large volumes of linked administrative and census data to study the lasting effects of Hurricane Katrina on the mortality and residential trajectories of New Orleans residents.
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Jacob Thomas
In terms of substance, my dissertation—“The Denied, the Deterred, and the Disenchanted: The Variety of Individuals that Do Not Travel or Migrate Abroad and Why” examines why more people do not travel or into the US. In terms of method, I am building and analyzing the first large scale individual-level survey dataset about three different types of individuals in China that do not travel or immigrate into the US--those that are denied visas, those that are deterred from applying for visas and going abroad, and ex-immigrants that previously intended to immigrate but then later change their mind and return. In terms of theory, I aim to draw on this data to better understand what we already know about immigrants and contribute new insights to longstanding perennial questions about migrant selectivity, state capacity to control migration and the relationship between social stratification/mobility/inequality and international migration and travel.
Website
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Burrel Vann Jr
Burrel Vann Jr is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at San Diego State University. His work tackles questions central to cultural and political change: how agents-of-change shift dominant perceptions of contested issues, and how policymakers and the general public respond to these attempts. This work includes investigations of politics, drugs, crime, and social movements using quantitative and computational methods. Prior to joining SDSU, in 2019, he completed his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine.
Website
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Rachelle Wang-Cendejas
Rachelle Wang-Cendejas is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on Family Sociology, Military Economics, and Social Stratification. Working as a research technician at a Federal Statistical Research Data Center, she has analyzed the migration patterns and associated socioeconomic outcomes of indigenous people in rural Alaska. Currently, Rachelle is completing her doctoral dissertation, studying U.S. military personnel’s long-term education and employment patterns. Based on sequence analysis and clustering solution, she examines and evaluates how individual social correlates are associated with different career pathways and corresponding life-course outcomes.
Image of Zheng Yang
Zheng Yang
Dr. Zheng Yang is an assistant professor in the Department of Public Administration at California State University, Dominguez Hills. She has a Ph.D. in Public Administration by North Carolina State University. Her research and teaching focuses on organizational theory and behavior, public and nonprofit management, social network governance, inter-organizational collaboration, performance management, as well as quantitative and qualitative research methods.
Website
Image of Hajar Yazdiha
Hajar Yazdiha
Hajar Yazdiha is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at University of Southern California and a faculty affiliate of the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration. Her research is centered on explaining the mechanisms underlying the politics of inclusion and exclusion, using mixed methods to examine why different ethnoracial groups perceive exclusion and strategize against inequality in particular ways. Through previous research projects, she has examined how macro-structures like immigrant integration policies, proposed legislation, and news media produce exclusionary conditions, as well as how targeted groups perceive and organize through micro-processes of meaning-making. In a new stream of research, she is interested in using digital trace data to examine the relationship between political culture and individual life outcomes, connecting political and cultural theory to demographic analysis.
Image of Ang Yu
Ang Yu
Ang Yu recently graduated from Stanford University with a master's degree in East Asian Studies. In September, he is heading to University of Wisconsin, Madison to start his PhD in sociology. Ang is broadly interested in social inequalities and quantitative methodology. His master's thesis probes the impact of parental wealth on the interdependent timings of young people's financial independence and housing attainment. He also has some ongoing projects related to educational inequality at their preliminary stages.
Website
Image of Yawen Yu
Yawen Yu
Yawen Yu is a PhD student in the Department of Education, University of California, Los Angeles, in the division of Human Development and Psychology. Her research interest is primarily in language development, more specifically, understanding the role of environmental factors in early language and bilingual language development. Prior to coming to UCLA, Yawen received a M.A. in Humanities Study from the University of Chicago, a B.A. in Philosophy from Zhejiang Gongshang University, China.
Image of Weijun Yuan
Weijun Yuan
Weijun Yuan is a PhD student in Sociology at UC Irvine. Her research interests are political sociology, media, and urban sociology. Her research examines how state actions shape social movements in the digital age and how information proliferation influences the state's ability to conduct surveillance. She relies on computational text analysis, statistical methods, and ethnographic work to answer these questions. As for computational methods, she is especially interested in exploring tools to detect and retrieve protest events using media data. Before starting the doctoral program, she earned a BA from Tsinghua University (Beijing) and an MA from UC San Diego.
Image of Boxiao Zhang
Boxiao Zhang
My research interest is Economic History, Urban Economics and Applied Econometrics. The research projects I am working on is focusing on long-term social mobility, modern education’s development and its impact on human capital accumulation and economic development.
Image of Marcel Roman
Marcel Roman

Website
Image of Michael Tzen
Michael Tzen

Website

Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon

All Participants


Image of Oscar Mendez
Oscar Mendez
Oscar Mendez is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, Mexico. He earned his Ph. D. in economics from the University of California, Davis. His fields of specialization are Labor Economics and International Trade. Between 2015 and 2018, Oscar was a Program Associate in the Economics program of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.
Website
Image of Adaner Usmani
Adaner Usmani
Adaner Usmani is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Watson Institute at Brown University. He received his PhD in Sociology from NYU. His dissertation examined the rise and fall of labor movements over the 20th and early 21st centuries, and considered the effects of these facts for political change. In other work, he has written about American mass incarceration, with an eye on the racial politics of its origins and reproduction.
Website
Image of Alejandro Martín del Campo
Alejandro Martín del Campo
Alejandro is an MBA and PhD at Tecnológico de Monterrey. He researches communication and public opinion at the intersection of traditional and emerging media and is currently researching political discourse and propaganda in social media. His interests are e-Democracy, Digital Culture, Internet & Human Rights. Alejandro has over a decade of experience in the broadcast industry, serving as executive producer. He holds degrees in engineering and law.
Image of Alejandra Escobar
Alejandra Escobar
Alejandra is a Computer Science Engineer currently studying her Masters in Industrial Economics in the School of Economics at Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, her research interests are in Labor Economics, especially in Human Capital Productivity. A non-traditional student, Alejandra’s prior professional experience includes regional management and service in one of the oldest firms in México.
Image of Bianca Chacon
Bianca Chacon
Bianca Chacon is a PhD student in Economics at Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Her research interests include the economics of education, social mobility and human capital. In the summer of 2015 she made a research stay in Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health, Glasgow Cadelonian University, Scotland, United Kingdom. Bianca received her bachelors degree in mathematics and her masters degree in economics both from Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.
Image of Carlos Saldaña
Carlos Saldaña
Carlos is studying the doctoral program in economics at the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon. His areas of interest are industrial organization, labor economics and spatial econometrics applied to regional studies.
Image of Cecilia Cuellar
Cecilia Cuellar
Cecilia Cuellar has a degree in International Relations and is currently a master's student at the School of Economics, U.A.N.L. She works in Labor Economics research, specifically on Human Capital and Gender Inequality. Currently, she is awaiting acceptance for the PhD program at the same school.
Image of Cesar Olivares
Cesar Olivares
César is a student of the Master in Industrial Economics at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. His main research interest is studying the effects of monetary policy using a machine learning approach using textual data. In general, he is interested in computational models for economics and social sciences. He was part of the Consorcio en Inteligencia Artificial in 2019
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Christofer Rodriguez
Chris is a doctorate student in economoic science in the School of Economics of the UANL. He previously earned a mathematics degree and a Masters degree in social sciences.
Image of Claudia Sánchez
Claudia Sánchez
Claudia Sánchez is a full time professor at Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. She obtained a Ph. D. in Economics from the same university, a master's degree from the University of Rochester and an Electronic Systems Engineering Degree from Tecnológico de Monterrey. Her areas of interest are growth, inequality, public finance and institutions.
Image of Jair Faz
Jair Faz
Jair is a M.Ec Student at the School of Economics and has a B.Sc in physics, both from the Autonomous University of Nuevo León in Mty, México. He is interested in the analysis of macroeconomics, finance and social events from a perspective of chaotic systems and complexity as a metodology to understand the dynamics of emerging, self-organized and adaptive phenomena. His current work focuses on the political business cycle present in the Mexican economy and its relationship to Public Expenditure exercised by the elected political party.
Image of Jeyle Ortiz
Jeyle Ortiz
Jeyle received her Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. She completed her Master of Economics and Public Policy at Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education. She earned a Fulbright scholarship to complete her PhD in Social Work at the University of Texas at Arlington. She works as a Professor at the School of Business of Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. She is member of the National System of Researchers in Mexico, level 1. Her research interests are gender, family, and wellbeing.
Image of Jorge Moreno
Jorge Moreno
Jorge Moreno obtained his Ph. D. and Masters degrees in Economics from the University of Chicago. He has been part of the faculty as Assistant and Associate Professor at El Colegio de México, the University of Chicago and Institutio Tecnológico Autónomo de México's Business School. He is currently Professor in the School of Economics of the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. His research interests include: Human Capital Theory, Family Economics, Labor Economics, Education Economics, Microfoundations of the Financial System and Economic Development, and Banking Theory and Financial Intermediation.
Image of Josue Salgado
Josue Salgado
Josué holds a BA in International Economics from the Autonomous University of Chihuahua (UACH), a Master in Economics from the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) and is currently studying the Ph.D in Economic Sciences at the Autonomous University of Nuevo León. He has worked in different companies and associations such as Telcel Corporative (Development Analyst), Profuturo Corporative (Savings for retirement), Economic Development Council of Chihuahua and the National Electoral Institute of Nuevo León respectively. He has published articles related to strategy and innovation. His current interests are focused on Macroeconomics, time series and business cycle.
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Juan Valdez
Juán has a Bachelor’s degree in physics and is currently a graduate student at the Autonomous University of Nuevo León studying a Master’s degree in industrial economics. His areas of interest are finanacial economics and industrial organization.
Image of Leidy Andrade
Leidy Andrade
I am currently studying for a doctorate in regional economics at the Center for Socioeconomic Research (CISE) of the Autonomous University of Coahuila. My thesis project is oriented to the analysis of inequality of opportunities especially in the area of housing quality in Mexico. Currently I am expanding my field of action focusing on the topic of networks, communities and the impact of culture on personal development.
Image of Lizette Serna
Lizette Serna
Development professional currently enrolled in Economics master. I have 6 years of experience in International Organizations and Research Centers both as researcher and grant management (mainly in agriculture and development topics). In the private sector I have 4 years of experience in an agricultural enterprise.
Image of Martha Rodríguez
Martha Rodríguez
Martha received her Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), Master of Business Administration with a specialty in Finance from the School of Business of the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL). A Doctorate in Mathematical Methods in Financial Economics from the University of Barcelona. She is member of the National System of Researchers in Mexico, level 1. Her research interests are Corporate Social Responsibility and Eco-efficiency in Finance. She has recently been interested in Big Data, Data Science and their impact in the financial performance.
Image of Matías Milia
Matías Milia
Matías Milia is a Ph.D. Candidate in Social Science Research with a mention in Sociology at FLACSO-México. His dissertation takes a semantic-statistical approach to different text sources such as scientific papers, written media, and Congress debates in order to see how technical debates and social expectations on renewable energy have developed through time in two Latin-American countries, México and Argentina. Since memory and present are inextricably bound to futurity, he follows concepts as a way to see how this horizon ties to national visions and imaginaries. He has worked and lived in three different Latin-American countries, so he is keen on using computational social methods to better understand the region, its history, and the way it stands towards the Grand Challenges of our time.
Image of Mauricio Acosta
Mauricio Acosta
My name is Mauricio Acosta. I'm currently studying a Master Degree in Economics at Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. My fields of research are Industrial Organization and Applied Econometrics. I´m interested in statistical computing softwares and Big Data models. In the past, I've worked as a Master Planner for a company and as a Research Assistant at Universidad de Guadalajara.
Image of Miriam Valdés
Miriam Valdés
Computer Systems Engineer with Master and Phd degree in Regional Economics. Professor at Centro de Investigaciones Socioeconomicas, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila. My research projects are directed toward regional economic analysis, combining different non-parametric techniques.
Image of Monica Cardozo
Monica Cardozo
Mónica Cardozo is a PhD student at the Department of Economics at Universidade Federal do Pará - Brasil. Currently, she is in an exchange program in México, at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. She is interested in Intraregional Trade and Industrial Economics. In addition, her research project is oriented to study the trade relationships between China and Latin-America using Panel Data Analysis.
Image of Oscar Almendárez
Oscar Almendárez
Oscar Almendárez is a PhD student in Economoics at Autonomous University of Nuevo León. He received his master's degree in Applied Economics from the College of the Northern Border at Tijuana. His main fields of research are Industrial Organization and Labor Economics. His current work focuses on competition in the financial sector, social security and labor market structure. He has a deep interest in the acquisition of computational techniques for the adaptation of economic models to diverse fields of research.
Image of Phelipe Matos
Phelipe Matos
My name is Phelipe André Matos Cruz, I am a Brazilian PhD student in Economics at Universidade Federal do Pará. I'm intereted in gaining a better perspective for my research through computational techniques, especially those related to Social Network Analysis (SNA). My current work focuses on the Brasilian Innovation System. I intend to analyse the Brasilian Triple Helix Model through the productivity of the relationships between its companies and universities.
Image of Edgar Luna
Edgar Luna
Edgar is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, México. He obtained his Ph. D. degree in Economics from the University of Washington, Seattle. His research interests include: Times Series, Applied Macroeconomics, and Public Finance.

University of Chicago

All Participants


Image of Kat Albrecht
Kat Albrecht
Kat Albrecht is pursuing a PhD in Sociology at Northwestern University and a JD at the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. Her research focuses on investigating how the structure of data shapes research conclusions and broader sociological theory. Using machine learning methods, quantitative causal inference, and mapping techniques she primarily builds and analyzes large criminal justice datasets. She is especially concerned with the economics of fear, the working definition of homicide, and the general state of crime data. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota where she first began exploring the junction of computational methods and the social sciences.
Website
Image of Natalie Gallagher
Natalie Gallagher
Natalie Gallagher is doctoral student in psychology at Northwestern University. She is fascinated by the human ability to think about social phenomena that emerge from human interaction - social networks and social categories. Exploring these, her work lies at the intersection of social and cognitive research. She draws on psychological, sociological, and computational methods to pursue her questions, and is interested in how research can inform social change. Natalie received her BA in psychology and theater from Georgetown University, and has an MA in psychology from Northwestern.
Image of Tina Law
Tina Law
Tina Law is a PhD student in sociology at Northwestern. Her research explores why we continue to live in unequal neighborhoods even as our cities are constantly changing. In particular, she uses computational methods and large-scale, digitized data from administrative systems and archival sources to understand how historical events shape contemporary neighborhood racial inequality. She is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She holds an MA in sociology from Yale.
Image of Joshua Becker
Joshua Becker
Joshua Becker is a postdoctoral fellow with the Kellogg School of Management and the Northwestern Institute of Complex Systems. Their research on collective intelligence uses agent-based models, online experiments, and data science to examine how network dynamics shape group decisions. Joshua’s current research focuses on how communication networks can increase or decrease the accuracy of factual beliefs in areas such as financial forecasting, political beliefs, and medical diagnoses.
Website
Image of Sushmita Gopalan
Sushmita Gopalan
Sushmita is a data scientist at the Northwestern Neighbourhood and Network Initiative at Northwestern University. She uses network and spatial analysis to understand the ways in which social ties, space and their intersection influence behaviour. She has a B.A./M.A. in Economics from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras and an M.A. in Computational Social Science from the University of Chicago.
Image of Maira Khwaja
Maira Khwaja
Maira is a first generation Pakistani-American, born and raised in Pittsburgh. She studied history at the University of Chicago, focusing on the South Side of Chicago. She interviews young people about their experiences with police, produces events and workshops, and guides outreach communications for the Invisible Institute, a 501(c) journalism production company.
Website
Image of Sharon Meraz
Sharon Meraz
Sharon Meraz’s work resides in the interplay of political communication, networked journalism, social networks, and mass media theory. As a scholar centrally interested in political activism and political engagement online, she explores how mass media effect theories take shape and evolve due to the growth of networked, social media technologies that empower political publics. In bringing a social network analytic perspective to the evolving media ecology, she has explored such new theoretical premises as networked gatekeeping, networked framing, network agenda setting, memetics, and virality. Meraz is also interested in automated content analysis, natural language processing, and social network visualization of big data. Her work has explored political activity and activism networks in such social applications as blogs, Twitter, Facebook, and online political forums during electoral cycles, disaster times, and social movements. Meraz is an Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Department of Communication. She also serves on several diversity committees and initiatives at the university, including the Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) and Fellowship Committees for Minority Students.
Website
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Andrew Papachristos
Andrew Papachristos is Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University and he is the Director of the Northwestern Neighborhood and Network (N3) Initiative. He is also a Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern. His research aims to understand how the connected nature of cities—how their citizens, neighborhoods, and institutions are tied to one another—affect what we think, feel, and do. His main area of research applies network science to the study of gun violence, police misconduct, illegal gun markets, street gangs, and urban neighborhoods.
Website
Image of Aaron Shaw
Aaron Shaw
Aaron Shaw studies organization, collaboration, governance, and inequality in online environments. His current projects try to understand why and how a few peer production communities (like Wikipedia) grow and sustain valuable public information resources when most do not. Aaron is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at Northwestern University, where he directs the Media, Technology & Society (MTS) Program. He is also a Faculty Associate of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and a member of the Community Data Science Collective, which he founded together with Benjamin Mako Hill. During 2017-2018, Aaron held a Lenore Annenberg and Wallis Annenberg Fellowship in Communication at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University.
Website
Image of Rochelle Terman
Rochelle Terman
Rochelle is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago, where she’ll begin as Assistant Professor in Fall 2020. Her research examines international norms, gender and advocacy, with a focus on the Muslim world. She is currently working on a book project that examines resistance and defiance towards international norms. The manuscript is based on her dissertation, which won the 2017 Merze Tate (formerly Helen Dwight Reid) Award for the best dissertation in international relations, law, and politics from the American Political Science Association. She teaches computational social science at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, including Machine Learning for Political Science at Stanford and Introduction to Computational Tools and Techniques at Berkeley. She is a certified instructor with Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science with a designated emphasis in Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to Chicago, she was a post-doc at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University.
Website
Image of Abigail Smith
Abigail Smith
Abby Smith is a PhD student in the Department of Statistics at Northwestern. She is interested in record linkage and missing data in the context of global health and human rights.
Image of Andrew Szmurlo
Andrew Szmurlo
Andrew will matriculate the PhD program in Information Science at Cornell University this fall. He is interested in network analysis, causal inference, online communication and incentives. He also likes: running, ML algorithms, cryptocurrency, and pizza.
Image of Chad Van De Wiele
Chad Van De Wiele
Chad Van De Wiele is a PhD student and NSF-IGERT Fellow in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Chad employs a variety of methodological and theoretical approaches to study social networks; specifically, his research focuses on political discourse, affect, visuality, and representations and reproductions of race, class, gender, and sexuality within networked spaces. Chad has presented his work at various academic conferences, including NCA, ICA, and AoIR, and has published work in proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and Social Media + Society.
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Christina Schoenberg
Christina Schonberg is a postdoctoral research associate at UW-Madison. They earned their PhD in Developmental Psychology from UCLA and BA in Psychology from Northwestern University. Christina studies how variability in early language experiences (e.g., infants who are raised in monolingual vs. bilingual homes) influences outcomes such as cognitive flexibility and vocabulary development. Their graduate training focused on behavioral lab-based methods such as eye-tracking, and they are now learning methods for incorporating larger-scale datasets (such as longitudinal speech corpora) into their work as well.
Image of Crystal Shi
Crystal Shi
Crystal Shi is a PhD candidate in the School of Hospitality & Tourism Management at Purdue University. She received her Master’s in Hospitality & Tourism Management in December 2013 from Purdue University. Prior to returning to Purdue to pursue her PhD, Crystal spent four years working in the hotel industry. She started as a management trainee at the Fairmont Olympic Hotel in Seattle After that, she was promoted to the position of Food & Beverage Manager at the Fairmont Peace Hotel in Shanghai. Crystal’s research area is primarily employee well-being, turnover intention, and psychological contract in the hotel industry. She is particular interested in conducting research regarding the daily fluctuation of hotel employees' daily well-being and turnover intention.
Image of Donghyun Kang
Donghyun Kang
Donghyun Kang is a Ph.D. student in Chicago Sociology Department, working at Knowledge Lab. His overarching academic interest centers on the hybridization of ideas. Using cutting-edge network and text analysis methods, he aspires to shed light on the social conditions, processes, and consequences of interdisciplinary research. He is also interested in employing experimental designs to study the social processes that generate consensus or dissonance when conflicting theories and evidence coexist. Prior to coming to the University of Chicago, Donghyun received a B.A. in Business Administration and M.A. in Sociology at Seoul National University. He also worked as a research associate at Social Network Computing Center (SNCC) in Seoul National University, where he collaborated with researchers from Cyram Inc.
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Eric Dunford
Eric Dunford is an Associate Director and Assistant Teaching Professor for the Master of Science in Data Science for Public Policy program in the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. His research focuses on the organizational and tactical behavior of violent non-state organizations. He is currently involved in a number of projects regarding event data integration, predicting conflict processes, and leveraging online video game data to study how groups innovate and adapt.
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Erin Anderson
Erin M. Anderson is a PhD candidate in Psychology at Northwestern University. Her research examines our learning processes from infancy into adulthood. Currently, she is investigating what helps us recognize patterns across different contexts, and whether being surprised at an unmet expectation can motivate us to seek out more information and revise our beliefs.
Image of Ikiltezilani Mazehuani
Ikiltezilani Mazehuani
Ikiltezi is a graduate student at The University of Chicago where she studies sociology. She has also held public policy and political science fellowships at Princeton and Duke Universities. As an immigration scholar, her research currently explores the effects of legality on immigrants. Specifically, she studies the effects that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program has had on the lives of young people who hold this work authorization, particularly their level of economic integration. Prior to graduate school, Ikiltezi worked for five years on behalf of unaccompanied migrant children through the Office of Refugee Resettlement and Heartland Alliance. She currently works at The University of Chicago's School of Social Service Administration where she studies the impact that waiting (to regularize one's citizenship status) has on the lives of older undocumented adults.
Image of JungHwan Yang
JungHwan Yang
JungHwan Yang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My research sits at the intersection of media effects, political communication, and political behavior. I study how the current media landscape affects the patterns of news media use of the public and political elites: from understanding people’s reactions to different political events on social media to examine the way some government uses their powers to influence the way people talk about politics. I am currently working on multi-wave panel survey data combined with online tracking data of the panels to understand the political effects of information use.
Image of Kevin Pedraza
Kevin Pedraza
Kevin Pedraza is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Northwestern University. His research interests generally revolve around using geospatial methods to study crime. He hopes to expand his in computational social science skills to develop more sophisticated research designs for understanding variations of crime at the meso-level unit of analysis.
Image of Leah Castleberry
Leah Castleberry
Leah Castleberry is a first year Master of Public Policy (MPP) candidate at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy. Through her studies, she is exploring the ways in which the intersections of business, policy and innovative technologies can be used to create a more equitable future for marginalized communities. Her research interests include cultural competency in artificial intelligence, algorithmic bias and the digital divide. Prior to graduate school, Leah worked as a Senior Cognitive Consultant at IBM Global Business Services. She received a B.B.A. in International Business from Howard University in 2015.
Image of Nick Hagar
Nick Hagar
Nick Hagar is a first-year PhD student at Northwestern University, where he’s a member of the Computational Journalism Lab. He researches the people and technologies that produce journalism online and how they impact each other. He holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University and has worked in audience development and analytics for several digital newsrooms.
Ole Hexel
Ole Hexel is a doctoral candidate in the joint Ph.D. program between Northwestern University and Sciences Po Paris. At Northwestern, I have worked with Prof. Lincoln Quillian on an international meta-analysis of racial discrimination in hiring. At Sciences Po, I participate in a field experiment on anti-discrimination training. I use Python, mostly for web scraping, and R, for exploring and visualizing data.
Image of Peter Choi
Peter Choi
Eungang (Peter) Choi is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at The Ohio State University. He is also a graduate affiliate for Institute for Population Research (IPR). His research focuses on identifying fertility trends and using verbal autopsies to analyze causes of death. Methodological interests include Network analysis and NLP. He is originally from Seoul, South Korea.
Image of Rebecca Abbott
Rebecca Abbott
Rebecca Abbot is a PhD candidate in the Sociology department of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Rebecca's areas of research are primarily focused on economic policy, inequality, racial attitudes and group violence. Rebecca's dissertation works on improving models forecasting mass atrocities using random forests, clustering and neural networks.
Image of Richard Shafranek
Richard Shafranek
Richard Shafranek is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at Northwestern University. His research, which has appeared in Political Behavior, Political Communication, Political Psychology, and Weather, Climate, and Society, focuses on partisanship and polarization in American politics. Prior to graduate school, he worked as a market researcher, a political campaign operative, and in the non-profit sector, and was a Fulbright scholar to Indonesia (2011-12). He received a B.A. in Political Science from Allegheny College in 2010.
Image of Subhayan Mukerjee
Subhayan Mukerjee
Subhayan Mukerjee is a doctoral candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania, where he researches political communication with a focus on online audiences and online political polarization. In his dissertation, he is studying the structure of online audience networks in India, and theorizing the manner in which audiences navigate cultural divides in India’s uniquely multi-cultural society. His general interest in using computational techniques to answer questions of substantive social import stems from his early childhood fascination with Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series and the fictitious science of psychohistory. In his spare time, he can either be found cooking or supporting Arsenal football club with an aching in his heart.
Image of Tomoko Okada
Tomoko Okada
Tomoko Okada is a PhD candidate in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her areas of research interest lie in the intersection of science communication and political communication. She is especially interested in rural-urban divides in values about science and emerging technologies and unequal access to scientific news. In her dissertation, she explores these issues by combining survey data, text data of newspapers, and Twitter data.
Image of Zixi Chen
Zixi Chen
Zixi Chen is a PhD candidate from the Measurement and Quantitative Methods program of College of Education of Michigan State University. Her research interests include social network analysis, hierarchical linear model, and sensitivity analysis in social science. She is a quantitative research member of the Teachers in Social Media project, where she gains extensive experience of using traditional and exploratory/computational statistical methods for educational research. In this project, she particularly interests in learning teachers' resource acquisition behaviors in social medias for their students learning.
Image of Daniel Trielli
Daniel Trielli
Daniel Trielli​ is a PhD student at the Media, Technology and Society program at Northwestern. He is researching computational journalism and how news reaches the public in our increasingly algorithmically-defined world.

Boston

All Participants


Image of Ryan J. Gallagher
Ryan J. Gallagher
Ryan J. Gallagher is a PhD student at Northeastern University. At the Network Science Institute, he researches the dynamics of social networks using tools and theory from natural language processing and communications. He currently studies the affective phenomena of networked counterpublics. Ryan holds an MS in mathematics from the University of Vermont, where he worked with the Computational Story Lab at the Vermont Complex Systems Center, and a BA in math from the University of Connecticut.
Website
Image of David Hagmann
David Hagmann
David is a Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He received his PhD from the Department of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. His research looks at the desire to avoid information that may be painful to learn yet improve decision-making, persuasion on politically charged topics, and behavioral policy interventions (nudges).
Website
Image of Eaman Jahani
Eaman Jahani
Eaman Jahani is a graduate research assistant pursuing a PhD degree in Social and Engineering Systems with a minor in Statistics at MIT IDSS. Prior to MIT, he was a software engineer at Google for 4 years. His main training is in statistics and computer science, but recently he has been appreciating econometrics and modeling in applied economics. His past research examined the extent of bubbles vs truth-seeking in cryptocurrency markets and socio-economic prediction in social networks. His current research focuses on structural factors such as networks or institutions that regenerate inequality at a micro scale. Eaman spends too much time reading political commentaries.
Image of Yan Leng
Yan Leng
Yan is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at Human Dynamics group at MIT. She received dual masters in Computer Science and Transportation Engineering from MIT in 2016. Yan is interested in using a broad range of computational techniques to understand the network effect of social influence. In particular, she works on the inference, identification, and modeling of social influence and social learning with large-scale behavioral data in a networked environment. Besides, she also works on the combining network structure and personal attributes in maximizing cascading payoff.
Website
Image of Sanaz Mobasseri
Sanaz Mobasseri
Sanaz Mobasseri is an Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business. She received her PhD from the Management of Organizations Department at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business. Her research examines the role of emotion, cognition, and culture in shaping social networks and labor market outcomes. Much of her work is situated in organizational settings, where she examine the microfoundations of workplace inequality. Although grounded in sociology and organizational theory, her work integrates theoretical insights from social psychology and sociolinguistics. Her research methods are similarly diverse, ranging from experimental studies in the lab to audit studies in the field to computational approaches applied to large archival data sets.
Website
Image of Andrey Fradkin
Andrey Fradkin
I am an economist who studies digitization and search and matching markets. I've written papers on topics such as the design of Airbnb’s search and matching algorithm, reputation systems, online job search, and 401(k) contribution choices by workers. I am currently an assistant professor of marketing at the Boston University Questrom School of Business. My research has been published in both economics journals (American Economic Review, The Review of Economics and Statistics) and computer science conferences (ACM-EC). I've provided expert input about the digital economy at the President’s Council on Science and Technology and the Federal Trade Commission. Prior to BU, I was a postdoc at the Initiative on the Digital Economy at MIT. I worked as a data scientist at Airbnb while completing a Ph.D. in Economics at Stanford University. In my free time, I climb, write, and make a podcast.
Website
Image of Moshe Hoffman
Moshe Hoffman
Moshe Hoffman is a Research Scientist at the MIT Media Lab Human Dynamics Group and Lecturer at Harvard's Department of Economics. Moshe applies game theory, models of learning and evolution, and experimental methods, to try to decipher the (often subconscious) motives that shape our social behavior, preferences, and ideologies. Together with Erez Yoeli, he co-designed and teaches 'Game Theory and Social Behavior' which lays out this approach. Moshe obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago, Booth School of Business and his B.S. in Economics from the University of Chicago.
Website
Image of Abigail Z. Jacobs
Abigail Z. Jacobs
Abigail Jacobs is an incoming Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan in the School of Information and in Complex Systems. Previously, she was a postdoc at the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, where she was also a member of the Algorithmic Fairness and Opacity Working Group. She holds a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Colorado Boulder, during which she spent several years at Microsoft Research NYC and received funding from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. She received a BA in Mathematical Methods in the Social Sciences and Mathematics from Northwestern University.
Website
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In Song Kim
In Song Kim is an Associate Professor of Political Science. He holds a Ph.D. in Politics from Princeton University, where he received a Harold W. Dodds Fellowship for 2012-2013. His dissertation research on the effects of firms’ lobbying on trade policy-making received the 2015 Mancur Olson Award for the Best Dissertation in Political Economy. Professor Kim works at the intersection of statistical machine learning and political science. His research explores trade policies of various countries in the world on highly specific products, and political activities of firms that produce and trade goods internationally. He is also interested in developing statistical methods for causal inference with panel data, and text analysis for analyzing political documents.
Website
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Mohsen Mosleh
I am a research scientist at MIT Sloan School of Management. My work lies at the intersection of computational and social sciences. My interest includes misinformation, social media, social networks, and cooperation. In particular, I study how our cognition relates to our behavior on online social media. I use theoretical models based on (evolutionary) Game Theory, Network Science, and empirical (data-driven) models based on Machine Learning, Natural Language Processing, and Online Experiments. Prior to joining MIT, I was a postdoctoral researcher at Department of Psychology at Yale. I received my PhD in Engineering with a minor in Business Intelligence and Analytics, my Masters in Management, and my undergraduate in Engineering. I also worked as a Systems and Software Integration Lead for five years prior to starting my PhD.
Website
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Laura K. Nelson
Laura K. Nelson is a sociologist who uses computational methods to study social movements, culture, gender, institutions, and the history of feminism. Using computer-assisted texts analysis and network analysis, her dissertation examined the political logics underlying women’s movements in New York City and Chicago from 1865-1975. She is interested in further developing automated text analysis methods and best-practices for sociology and digital humanities. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. In 2014-2016 she was a postdoc in Management and Organizations in the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, and is on leave this year as a fellow for Digital Humanities @ Berkeley and the Berkeley Institute for Data Science at the University of California, Berkeley.
Website
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Alex 'Sandy' Pentland
Professor Alex 'Sandy' Pentland directs the MIT Connection Science and Human Dynamics labs and previously helped create and direct the MIT Media Lab and the Media Lab Asia in India. He is one of the most-cited scientists in the world, and Forbes recently declared him one of the '7 most powerful data scientists in the world' along with Google founders and the Chief Technical Officer of the United States. He co-led the World Economic Forum discussion in Davos that led to the EU privacy regulation GDPR, and was central in forging the transparency and accountability mechanisms in the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. He has received numerous awards and prizes such as the McKinsey Award from Harvard Business Review, the 40th Anniversary of the Internet from DARPA, and the Brandeis Award for work in privacy. He is a founding member of advisory boards for Google, AT&T, Nissan, and the UN Secretary General, a serial entrepreneur who has co-founded more than a dozen companies including social enterprises such as the Data Transparency Lab and the Harvard-ODI-MIT DataPop Alliance. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and leader within the World Economic Forum."
Website
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Brooke Foucault Welles
Brooke Foucault Welles is an Associate Professor in the department of Communication Studies and core faculty of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University. Combining the methods of network science with theories from the social sciences, Foucault Welles studies how online communication networks enable and constrain behavior, with particular emphasis on how these networks facilitate the pursuit of individual, team, and collective goals. Much of her work is interdisciplinary and collaborative, with co-authors from computer science, political science, digital humanities, design, and public health. Her recent contributions include a series of studies of the transformative power of networked counterpublics, techniques for the longitudinal analysis of communication networks using event-based network analysis, and guidelines for the effective use of network visualizations in scientific and lay publications. Her work is funded by grants from the US Army Research Office and US Army Research Lab, and has been featured in leading social science journals such as the Journal of Communication, Information, Communication and Society, and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She serves on the editorial board of the journal Web Science and was part of the team that developed the Network Literacy Essential Concepts and Core Ideas.
Website
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Jinhua Zhao
Jinhua Zhao is the Edward and Joyce Linde Associate Professor of City and Transportation Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prof. Zhao brings behavioral science and transportation technology together to shape travel behavior, design mobility system and reform urban policies. He develops methods to sense, predict, nudge and regulate travel behavior; designs multimodal mobility system that integrates autonomous vehicles, shared mobility and public transport; and reform urban policies to govern the new technologies and business models. Prof. Zhao sees transportation as a language to describe a person, to characterize a city, and to understand an institution. Prof. Zhao leads long-term research collaborations with major transportation authorities and operators worldwide including London, Chicago, Hong Kong and Singapore. He holds Master of Science, Master of City Planning and Ph.D. degrees from MIT and a Bachelor's degree from Tongji University. Prof. Zhao directs the Urban Mobility Lab (mobility.mit.edu) at MIT and is the founder of the MIT Automated Mobility Policy Project.
Website
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Frances Chen
Dr. Frances Chen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Georgia State University. Her research is focused on biosocial bases of antisocial behavior and related constructs, and includes topics at the intersection of criminology and psychology. Her quantitative works examine how life events and turning points in life (e.g., marriage) shape antisocial behavior, and how environment interacts with individuals’ biological characteristics (e.g., stress system, fear conditioning) to exacerbate or limit antisocial behavior throughout the life-course. She employs both psychophysiological recording and salivary bioscience research methods in furtherance of this work. Her current research on psychobiological and social characteristics of active, noninstitutionalized hardcore street offenders is an endeavor to advance our knowledge of the persistence in offending.
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Yuhao Du
Yuhao Du is a PhD student in Computer Science Department at University at Buffalo. His research interests include computational social science, natural language processing, computer vision and machine learning. Currently, he is working on: (1) measuring to what extent fake news is spread via online image memes, (2) incorporating Affect Control Theory to build a sentiment aware deep reinforcement learning chatbots.
Image of César Garro-Marín
César Garro-Marín
César is a Ph.D. student in Economics at Boston University. His research interests include migration and gender inequality. His current research explores how the industrial structure of local economies adjusts to international migration inflows. He previously held a position as lecturer at the Universidad de Costa Rica. César received his master’s degree in Economics and Finance from Centro de Estudios Monetarios y Financieros (CEMFI) and his bachelor’s degree in Economics from Universidad de Costa Rica.
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Rebekah Getman
Rebekah Getman is a Ph.D. student in Sociology at Northeastern University. After working in global public health for several years prior to graduate school, her research focus shifted to the United States. She focuses on feminist healthcare models, reproductive health, and health social movements, and is working on projects investigating vaccine-hesitant parent communities, abortion politics and polarized media networks, and the ways urban and health infrastructures overlap. She is interested how researchers can use qualitative and quantitative methods in complementary ways to identify and solve problems. Previously, Rebekah earned an M.Ed. from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and an B.A. from Harvard College in History and Government.
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Ariella Kristal
Ariella is a doctoral student in Organizational Behavior at Harvard Business School where she studies behavioral design. Specifically, she is interested in how environments can be structured to reduce bias in the workplace, in educational settings, in the online context, and in many others. She is also interested in using big data methods, such as computational text analysis to understand ways of improving feedback-giving. Previously, Ariella worked for the Behavioural Insights Team in London, where she applied findings from behavioral science to public policy. She has focused on delivering policy advice and designing and implementing field experiments related to sustainable transportation, criminal justice, and organizational behavior. Ariella graduated from Yale University with a BA in Ethics, Politics, and Economics.
Website
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Muyang Li
Muyang Li is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at University at Albany, SUNY. She holds a BA in Communication from the Communication University of China and an MSc in New Media from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research is organized around a key question: how does media interact with democracy and social justice. Her research is interdisciplinary in scope, which relies on methodological and theoretical frameworks across disciplines and fields, including sociology, communication, cultural studies, political science, and computer/information technology. Given these interests and her interdisciplinary background, Muyang’s dissertation applies mixed-method in exploring the negotiation between the authoritarian state and the individual in defining democracy through the social media, and try to reveal how the authoritarian regimes survived the ideological crisis in the social media era through the combination of repressive and hegemonic media control strategies.
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Amanda Lu
Amanda Lu is a PhD Student in Education Policy at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Her research focuses on how school choice policies and markets shape the educational experiences of students in traditionally underserved communities and is informed by economics, sociology, and political science. It seeks to understand how school choice changes political participation and facilitates the rise of new power structures and organizations in urban school systems. Before graduate school, Amanda was a high school teacher in New Orleans, LA where she taught high school math and served as the college counselor at Edna Karr High School. She earned a joint masters in Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies from the Stanford GSE and MPP from the Stanford Public Policy Program in 2017, and a bachelor’s degree in Government from Harvard College in 2011.
Website
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Tyler McDaniel
Tyler McDaniel is a PhD student in the Sociology department at Stanford University. His current research focuses on how racial segregation affects the daily lives of individuals. He draws from a variety of data models and algorithms in order to investigate social systems. Broadly, he is interested in schooling, meritocracy, and inequality. Tyler holds Bachelor’s degrees in Sociology and Mathematics from the University of Utah.
Website
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Harry Oppenheimer
Harry Oppenheimer is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Government at Harvard University with a focus on international relations and technology. His dissertation examines the role of interest groups in ICT security and governance, and utilizes text-as-data, document forensics, and survey experiments to understand how actors constrain one another through laws, standards, and policy diffusion. His other interests are in the political and psychological impact of cyber attacks, and elite social media engagement strategies during security crises. Prior to beginning his doctorate, he was a research associate for national security at the Council on Foreign Relations. Harry received his B.A. in International Relations from New York University and his A.M. in Government from Harvard University.
Website
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Shomon Shamsuddin
Shomon Shamsuddin is Assistant Professor of Social Policy and Community Development at Tufts. He studies how institutions define social problems and develop policies to address urban poverty and inequality. His research examines the effects of local and federal housing policy on socioeconomic mobility for low-income families. In addition, he studies programs to overcome barriers to educational attainment for underserved groups. At UEP, he teaches courses on housing policy and statistics. Prior to joining Tufts, Shomon was a National Poverty Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He holds a Ph.D. in Urban Policy and Planning from MIT, M.Arch. from Yale University, and Sc.B. in Neuroscience from Brown University.
Website
Image of SuYeong Shin
SuYeong Shin
SuYeong Shin is a doctoral candidate in Educational Policy as well as a master’s student in Informatics at The University of Iowa. Her scholarly lens blend frameworks from multiple disciplines such as higher education, sociology, and data science. Her research agenda aims to uncover the changing landscape of inequality amid educational expansion. She is interested in analyzing unstructured data to understand the complex interplay among students, educators, and local communities. Her current research examines access and equity in education, with a focus on college admissions.
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Jeffrey Sternberg
Jeff Sternberg is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Northeastern University. He is primarily interested in charting the shifting geographies of employment opened up by post-industrialization. His research focuses on how young people make decisions regarding their future and where to invest their mobility. Jeff’s dissertation research investigates these processes by looking at mobile populations including backpackers, temporary-workers, and digital nomads in the context of urban co-living spaces. He utilizes a mixed-methods approach, using text analysis and social network analysis techniques from the computational social sciences coupled with multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in Los Angeles, CA and Dharamsala, India. His work as a research assistant investigates the potential application of computer vision to social science inquiries, specifically looking at the intersection between representations of place/neighborhood and their effects on greater urban social and economic processes.
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Melodie Yunju Song
Melodie Yunju Song is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Social Media Lab, Ryerson University. She received her PhD in Health Policy from McMaster University, Canada, where she was a graduate fellow at the Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship. Her dissertation looked into the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy on Twitter and how decision-makers are making sense of social media to inform immunization policymaking. Her academic interests intersect public health communication (esp. vaccine-preventable diseases, substance abuse and misuse, mental health), evidence-informed policy making, and the role of emerging technologies (such as social media) to inform the former two. Melodie received a graduate certificate in Global Health from the University of Washington, an MSc in public health policy and management, and a BSN from the National Taiwan University, Taiwan.
Website
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Amir Tohidi
Amir Tohidi is a graduate research assistant pursuing a PhD degree in Social and Engineering Systems at MIT Institue for Data, Systems and Society (IDSS). His research interests lies at the intersection of Network Science, Causal Inference, and Behavioral Economics. He has been studying how ad hoc theoretical models of opinion dynamics in social networks can be derived from bounded rationality and behavioral biases. Most recently, he has been investigating the causal effect of online native ads on user’s perception of News publishers credibility in long run. Amir received his Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and Physics from Sharif University of Technology.
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Kartik Trivedi
Kartik Trivedi is a Ph.D. student at the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. His research focus is on low wage labor policy, and disability policy. He is currently involved in research projects concerning housing policies for persons living with disabilities and with a study of federal minimum wage policy. Before joining the Ph.D he was a research at University of Massachusetts Boston, where he worked on federal grants with focus on increasing workforce inclusion of people with disabilities. Kartik is trained in advanced statistical methods and is equally comfortable with qualitative research methods. You can talk to him in Hindi, English, R and STATA. Because of his interests in disability inclusion he is always on a lookout for inclusive data dissemination strategies.
Website
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Eitan Tzelgov
Eitan Tzelgov is a Lecturer in Politics at the School of Politics, Languages, Philosophy and Communication Studies, University of East Anglia. He is interested in political representation and legitimacy, and in the impact of issues of such ideology and migration on democratic institutions and the structure of political coalitions. Methodologically, his work combines applications of text analysis with causal and experimental methods. He has previously worked as a research fellow at the Varieties of Democracy Institute, where he was part of a team developing Bayesian models measuring various aspects of democracy over time.
Website
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Yilei Zeng
Yilei Zeng is a PhD Student in Computer Science at the University of Southern California. Broadly construed, her research focus on human decision making and behavioral patterns in gamified environments. Currently, she is working on (1) Utilizing social media and network data to extract knowledge from online gaming communities; (2) Training AI agents that can learn and interact according to human behaviors in multiplayer games; (3) Modeling personalized motivations and incentives in gamification environments and transfer discovered patterns to real life. Her research draws upon methods from natural language processing, network science, agent-based models, statistics and machine learning (with an emphasis on deep learning and reinforcement learning).
Website
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Emily H. Ho
Emily H. Ho is a PhD student at Fordham University in the Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology program. Her research looks at decision-making under uncertainty and forecasting, particularly in policy contexts. Prior work has included examining how people communicate about uncertain outcomes in climate change and intelligence analysis and the psychological factors that might demotivate concern about climate change. Her recent interests include natural language processing and sentiment analysis, as it relates to uncertainty communication, and she is currently working on investigating ways of optimizing forecasting accuracy and looking at individual differences that produce good forecasters. Previously, at The College Board, Emily worked on assessing reliability and validity of large-scale educational assessments. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and The College Board, among others. Emily has a Bachelors in Psychology at New York University and a Masters in Psychology at Fordham University.
Website
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Erin Tichenor
Erin Tichenor graduated with her B.A. in Sociology from Boston University in May 2019. Her coursework focused on on racial and economic inequality, punishment and social control, and health disparities. Based on field work and interviews she conducted while studying abroad in New Zealand, her senior thesis was about the decriminalization of sex work in New Zealand and its exclusion of migrant sex workers. She is a research assistant at BU Sociology and in the Business School, working on Jessica Simes’ projects on solitary confinement, the geography of mass imprisonment, and with Sanaz Mobasseri on developing a study on workplace misconduct and labor market consequences.

2018


Hunter College

All Participants


Image of Maria Y. Rodriguez
Maria Y. Rodriguez
Dr. Rodriguez is an Assistant Professor at the Silberman School of Social Work, part of the City University of New York’s Hunter College. Her research interests intersect demography, data science, housing policy and social welfare. Currently, she has three active areas of research: (1) identifying the impacts of the U.S. foreclosure crisis on foreign-born Latinos by examining foreclosure mitigation policy; (2) understanding the impacts of algorithmic decision-making in human services (with particular attention to racially marginalized groups), and (3) using Twitter data to understand the lived experience of marginalized communities in the United States. She can be found on Twitter [@HousingTheCity](https://twitter.com/HousingTheCity).
Website
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Glenera Bates
Gleneara E. Bates is currently doctoral student at CUNY Graduate Center. I’m interested in exploring the environmental risk factors for chronic diseases among racially ethnic minorities living in New York.
Image of Katharine Bloeser
Katharine Bloeser
Katharine Bloeser is an Assistant Professor at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College. Katharine is a licensed independent clinical social worker in the District of Columbia. Katharine's work focuses on underrepresented populations of veterans including those who identify as sexual and gender minorities. Her work examines the intersection of the veteran identity with age, race/ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.
Website
Image of Jagadisa-Devasri Dacus
Jagadisa-Devasri Dacus
Dr. Dacus possess an extensive history of working for and with community based organizations, nonprofits, and state and local health departments engaged in the provision of programs and interventions for at-risk racial and ethnic populations, youth and young adults, drug users, and LGBTQ populations. His public health research takes a strengths-based examination of maintained HIV-negativity among Black men who have sex with men (MSM). In addition to his behavioral science research, he currently provides consulting services in the areas of organizational development, capacity building, program development and evaluation, and cultural competency with an emphasis on LGBTQ populations.
Nathalie Lebron
Coming soon!
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Carmen Morano
Dr. Carmen Morano is a Professor of Social Work and Chair of the Aging Field of Practice. Carmen is a John A. Hartford Faculty Scholar (2003-2005) and Founding Director of Silberman Aging: A Hartford Center of Excellence in Diverse Aging His research includes developing and evaluating psychoeducational interventions for caregivers of persons with dementia, program evaluations for community-based agencies and developing competency-based curriculum. His more resent research is focused on evaluating interprofessional education and practice and the use of social network analysis to evaluate a caregiver support program.
Website
Gilbert Nick
Coming soon!
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Austin Oswald
Austin Oswald is a PhD Social Welfare student at the City University of New York. He earned his BSc in Therapeutic Recreation at Dalhousie University, MA in Applied Health Sciences at Brock University, and Graduate Certificate in Interdisciplinary Qualitative Studies at the University of Georgia. Austin is involved in research that explores the distinct needs of LGBTQ people, and he has disseminated his work though publications, presentations, and community lectures. Currently, Austin is working with Dr. Nancy Giunta on her national program evaluation of LGBTQ cultural competence trainings for aging service providers.
Image of Maurice Vann
Maurice Vann
Maurice T. Vann is a doctoral candidate, researcher, and lecturer who develops, implements, and evaluates programs that assist returning citizens with reintegrating into their communities. He is a justice system advocate who has worked in advocacy organizations, courts, corrections facilities, and jails throughout the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan region. Currently, he is investigating the role returning citizens played in quelling community unrest in Baltimore during the Freddie Gray Uprising of 2015.
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Khudodod Khudododov
Khudodod Khudododov is currently a PhD student in Social Welfare program at Graduate Center, CUNY. He completed his MSW from Washington University in St. Louis. He has worked with various local and international organizations in the capacity of evaluation specialist. His main interest is in the application of contemporary statistical and machine learning models to ever-growing social science data to make better and stronger evidence based decisions. Additionally Khudodod is an instructor at Silberman School of Social Work teaching research and statistics.

University of Capetown

All Participants


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Vissého Adjiwanou
Vissého Adjiwanou is a Senior Lecturer in Demography and Quantitative Methods at the University of Cape Town (South Africa), and adjunct professor at the Department of Demography at the Université de Montréal (Canada). His research interests include maternal and reproductive health, family dynamics, and female employment in sub-Saharan Africa. Vissého is the chair of the Panel on Computational Social Science at the Union for African Population Studies (UAPS).
Website
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Tom Moultrie
Tom Moultrie is professor of demography, and Director of the Centre for Actuarial Research (CARe) at the University of Cape Town. His interests lie in the technical measurement and sociology of fertility in sub-Saharan Africa, and the sociology of demographic measurement. He holds a BBusSc (Actuarial Science) from UCT, a MSc (Development Studies) from the LSE, and a PhD from LSHTM.
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Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and he is affiliated with several of Princeton's interdisciplinary research centers: the Office for Population Research, the Center for Information Technology Policy, the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research interests include social networks and computational social science. He is the author of the forthcoming book *Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.*
Website
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Chris Bail
Chris Bail is the Douglas and Ellen Lowey Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University and a member of the Interdisciplinary Program on Data Science, the Duke Network Analysis Center, and the Duke Population Research Institute. His research examines how non-profit organiations and other political actors shape social media discourse using large text-based datasets and apps for social science research. He is the author of *Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream*.
Website
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Marshini Chetty
Marshini Chetty is a research scholar in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University where she directs the Princeton Human Computer Interaction laboratory. She specializes in human computer interaction, usable security, and ubiquitous computing. She has a Ph.D. in Human-Centered Computing from Georgia Institute of Technology, USA and a Masters and Bachelors in Computer Science from University of Cape Town, South Africa. Marshini regularly publishes at top tier venues including CHI, CSCW, and SOUPS.
Website
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Nick Feamster
Nick Feamster is a professor in the Computer Science Department at Princeton University and the Deputy Director of the Princeton University Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP). Before joining the faculty at Princeton, he was a professor in the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech. He received his Ph.D. in Computer science from MIT in 2005, and his S.B. and M.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2000 and 2001, respectively. His research focuses on many aspects of computer networking and networked systems, with a focus on network operations, network security, and censorship-resistant communication systems.
Website
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Ridhi Kashyap
Ridhi Kashyap is associate professor of social demography at the University of Oxford and a fellow of Nuffield College. Ridhi’s interests span a number of substantive areas in demography and sociology, including gender, marriage and family, health and mortality, and ethnicity and migration. She is interested in how digital and computational innovations, both in terms of new data sources (e.g web data) and methods (e.g agent-based modeling and microsimulation) can be used in social and demographic research.
Website
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Vukosi Marivate
Vukosi Marivate holds a PhD in Computer Science (Rutgers University, as a Fulbright Scholar). He is a senior Data Scientist and acting research group leader for Data Science at the CSIR, focusing on creating/using Machine Learning/Artificial Intelligence to extract insights from data to tackle societal challenges. Vukosi is an organiser of the Deep Learning Indaba, the largest Machine Learning/Artificial Intelligence workshop on the African continent, aiming to strengthen African Machine Learning. He supervises postgraduate students and leads the CSIR’s Data Science student development program.
Website
Deen Freelon

David Lazer

Kristian Lum

Sendhil Mullainathan

Duncan Watts


Image of Chukwuedozie K. Ajaero
Chukwuedozie K. Ajaero
Chukwuedozie K. Ajaero holds a PhD in Population Geography, which was funded with a grant from the International Foundation for Science (IFS) Stockholm, Sweden. He is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Demography and Population Studies Programme of the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa, and also a Lecturer in the Department of Geography, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. His areas of research interests include migration, environment and livelihoods linkages as well as health and quality of life studies. He has to his credit journal articles, book chapters, and is a co-author of a book titled “Climate Change and the Nigerian Environment
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Mustafa Ali
Mustafa Ali is doing Masters in Computer Science Department at university of Cape Town. He completed his Honors’ degree in Statistics and Computer Science at the university of Khartoum. In his MSc project he is developing subscription service for large astronomical data sets.
Image of Donatus Yaw Atiglo
Donatus Yaw Atiglo
D. Yaw Atiglo is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Ghana where he had his masters and doctoral training. With expertise in Demography and Social Statistics, his main research interests include population-environment nexus, women's reproductive health behaviour, gender and migration.
Image of Lamègou François Badjadouna
Lamègou François Badjadouna
Lamègou François Badjadouna works at the National Statistics Agency of Togo. He holds a Master degree in Economics and Statistical Engineering from the sub-Regional Institute of Statistics and Applied Economics of Yaoundé (Cameroon). His research focuses on how to leverage data analytics to foster better development policies.
Image of Aristide Romaric Bado
Aristide Romaric Bado
Aristide Romaric Bado (PhD) is a senior research scientist in Demography. He is currently the Demography and Research Officer for the Regional Programme of Demography, Sexual and Reproductive Health (DEMSAN) at the West African Health Organization (WAHO). Prior to joining WAHO, he was researcher at the Research Institute and Health Science (IRSS) of the National Center for Scientific and Technological Research (CNRST)/Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso and lecturer in demography and quantitative methods. He was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship for his post-doctoral research at the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal in Canada. He holds a PhD in Population studies from the University of Western Cape (Cape Town, South Africa), a Master’s degree in Demography from the Demographic Training and Research Institute (IFORD) at the University of Yaoundé II (Cameroon) and a B.Sc. in Economics from the University of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso).
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Richard Barnett
Richard Barnett is a lecturer in the Department of Information Science at Stellenbosch University and a co-founder of the Computational Social Science group in the Department. He is also a member of the Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research. He comes from a computing sciences background with a strong technical focus. With this in mind, his current research focuses on a machine learning approach to the identification of sybils on online social network platforms. This approach is specifically focused on the use of social network analysis metrics, and specifically network structure in the construction of feature vectors.
Image of Flint Chenjera
Flint Chenjera
Flint Chenjera is a graduate student at UCT. During the two years of MPhil demographic studies, Flint mastered aspects to do with dealing with demographic incomplete data, handling survey, textual, network, spatial and longitudinal data; using statistical tools such as excel, STATA and R. Flint holds an BSc degree in Statics from University of Zimbabwe and yet to complete an master’s degree in demography at University of Cape Town. His area of study is in family dynamics and child health.
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Aldu Cornelissen
Aldu Cornelissen is a lecturer and PhD candidate at the Department of Information Science at Stellenbosch University. He co-found the Computational Social Science group at Stellenbosch University, and is a member of the Centre of Artificial Intelligence (CAIR). The group’s research focuses on the impact of social media in society by investigating bot interference during political elections in Sub-Sahara Africa. Aldu specialises in Social Network Analysis, specifically individual and group social cognition.
Hailu Debere

Image of Robert Y. Djogbenou
Robert Y. Djogbenou
Robert Y. Djogbenou is a Research Assistant at the Center for Training and Research in Population (CEFORP), University of Abomey-Calavi (Benin). He has a Master in Demography and a Bachelor in Statistics. His research interests span maternal and child health, gender, education and migration.
Judith Donang

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Ahmed Eldud
Ahmed Eldud studied at University of Juba (Sudan) and obtained B.Sc general in Statistis and Population Studies in 2005. He later obtained a B.Sc honours in Statistical Science in 2011 at the University of Western Cape (South Africa) and a M.Sc in Mathematical Statistics in 2016 at Rhodes University (South Africa). Ahmed pursues a Ph.D at the University of the Western Cape since 2016. He works at the devision of the postgraduate studies at the University of the Western Cape as data analysis.
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Arlette Simo Fotso
Arlette Simo Fotso got a PhD in Applied Economics. She is currently Postdoctoral Research Fellow at ICAP at Columbia University and at the University of the Witwatersrand. Arlette is involved in the Population-Based HIV Impact Assessments (PHIA) project. The PHIA project is running national surveys in 14 Sub-Saharan African countries plus Haiti to measure the reach and impact of HIV programs. Her research interests are Health, Education and Labour Economic, inequalities, disability, HIV, family and use of big data to assess health issues and migration and their impact in developing countries.
Mbongeni Hlabano

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Bunakiye Japheth
Bunakiye Japheth is a lecturer of Computer Science at Edo University Iyamho, Department of Computer Science and Mathematics. He received his PhD from the Computer Science Department at University of Port Harcourt Nigeria. His research focused on the application of domain specific modelling approach to modelling engineering designs in the oil and gas transmission pipeline systems. Much of his work is directed at requirements within a particular domain, where the structure and behaviour of the prototype system capturing stakeholders design intents that depict various design scenarios were examined. His research methodology was hinged on Domain Specific modelling of Model Driven Engineering Technologies that tackles complexities in domains through language formalisms that could be beyond the utilization of stakeholders. This language formalism is simply a reusable software layer that can be tailored to any specific domain through requirements engineering for greater stakeholder output.
Benson John

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Takwanisa Machemedze
Takwanisa Machemedze is a researcher at DataFirst at the University of Cape Town. He holds a PhD in Sociology and an MPhil in Demography both from the University of Cape Town, and a BSc Hon in Statistics from the University of Zimbabwe. His research interests include demography, remote sensing and small area estimation.
Image of Rornald Kananura Muhumuza
Rornald Kananura Muhumuza
Kananura Rornald Muhumuza is a population health researcher with a background in economics and statistics. He is pursuing his PhD in Demography and Population Studies at London School of Economics and Political Science. He is applying systems thinking analysis approach to understand Child Health and Survival in Uganda. Rornald has experience in designing and implementing Monitoring and Evaluation systems, which he has gained through leading numerous interventions. His research interests are pathway analysis, spatial and small area estimation, forecasting and machine learning, longitudinal and panel data analysis. He is also interested in generating research products that inform appropriate decision-making.
Image of Abdualaziz Mukhtar
Abdualaziz Mukhtar
Abdualaziz Mukhtar holds a Bachelor Honours and a Master Degree in Mathematical Sciences from the University of the Western Cape (UWC) South Africa. He is currently enrolled for a doctoral research degree (Ph.D.) in Mathematical Epidemiology under the Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics at UWC. His research approach intended to makes use of statistic inference and covered practical applications of modelling, including predicting the impact of control, interpreting outbreak data and modelling in real-time, fitting models to data.
Image of Alecia Ndlovu
Alecia Ndlovu
Xichavo Alecia Ndlovu is a lecturer in the Political Studies department at the University of Cape Town. She is also completing her PhD in International Relations at Wits University. She holds a BA in International Relations and Applied Economics, as well as an MA (with distinction) in International Relations. Her main research and teaching interests are in political economy of development, politics and governance in Africa, comparative politics and quantitative research methods. Her thesis is entitled “Sustaining the unsustainable? Political institutions and development in sub-Saharan Africa’s resource economies.” It combines cross-national statistical research and fieldwork in four African countries—Ghana, Mozambique, Namibia and Zambia.
Image of Nelly Ruth Nkhoma
Nelly Ruth Nkhoma
Nelly Ruth Nkhoma holds an Honours Degree in Population Studies and is currently studying towards an MPhil in Demography at the University of Cape Town. Her research interests lie in the field of public health specifically in child health and mortality. She has done work in policy research and monitoring and evaluation.
Image of Emmanuel Olamijuwon
Emmanuel Olamijuwon
Emmanuel Olamijuwon is a lecturer at the University of Swaziland. He is also a PhD candidate in demography and population studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. His research adapts computational approaches in assessing the effectiveness of social media-based sexuality education in improving the sexual and reproductive health, knowledge and rights of young adults in Africa. By combining innovative and youth-friendly approaches, he hopes to drive new discussions on the role of digital media in demographic studies. Beside his high-level academic activities, Emmanuel also plays an active role in various interdisciplinary research projects many of which revolve around the social determinants of health, sexual and reproductive health, digital demography as well as the demography of African families. He is the coordinator of the Sexually Healthy and Young [SHY] Adults network (https://shyadult.org/)
Website
Image of Vundli Ramokolo
Vundli Ramokolo
Dr Vundli Ramokolo is Specialist Scientist at the South African Medical Research Council Health Systems Research Unit. She holds a Master of Public Health (Epidemiology) degree from the University of Cape Town and a doctorate from the University of Bergen, Norway. She is an Epidemiologist with a keen interest in (1) the interactions between nutrition and disease, (2) developmental origins of health and disease and (3) the relation between inequalities and health outcomes. She is a co-investigator in the South African prevention of mother-to-child-transmission evaluation (SAPMTCTE) and a Co-PI in a birth cohort assessing the utilisation of the CSG and its link to dietary diversity and child growth. Her current research addresses both the clinical and social determinants of child health outcomes. More specifically, the work assesses the effect of factors at the individual, household and small area level deprivation on birth outcomes in HIV exposed and unexposed infants.
Image of Motlatso Rampedi
Motlatso Rampedi
Motlatso Rampedi is a qualified demographer with an Honours and Master’s degree in Demography & Population Studies from the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa). She is now pursuing a PhD in Demography at the University of the Witwatersrand. Her interests lie in Health research, with specific focus on Noncommunicable diseases, HIV and sexual and reproductive health. Her PhD thesis is on comorbidities of chronic diseases among the adult population in South Africa. Some of her career highlights include forming part of a team of researchers that conducted research on an HIV prevention vaginal ring for women in four African countries (Malawi, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe) and working on a project to generate demand for voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC) in South Africa.
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Bontle Segobe
Bontle Segobe obtained her Masters in Population studies this year in April and will pursue her PhD in Population studies at University of KwaZulu-Natal from second semester of the year 2018. Her research interests are in drug use amongst youth. In 2014, she obtained her Degree in psychology from University of Johannesburg and later in 2015, obtained her honours in Psychology from University of KwaZulu-Natal. She is currently a research assistant at SARCHI: Economic Development, KwaZulu-Natal.
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Stephen Ojiambo Wandera
Stephen Ojiambo Wandera is a Lecturer at the Department of Population Studies, Makerere University. He holds a PhD in Population Studies. He is a graduate of the Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA). His PhD research focused on “Disparities in access to healthcare among older persons in Uganda”. He holds an MSc. in Population and Reproductive Health and a BSc. in Population Studies. His research focuses on: sexual and gender-based violence, reproductive health; inequalities in health; and inequalities in access to health(care) in Uganda.
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Gerald Nathan Balekaki
Gerald Nathan Balekaki is a doctoral student in the UCT Department of Computer Science.
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Chido Chinogurei
Chido Chinogurei is a Data Analyst at the National Income Dynamics Study (NIDS) and a Research Assistant at the Centre for Actuarial Research (CARe) at the University of Cape Town.

University of Boulder

All Participants


Image of Brian Keegan
Brian Keegan
Brian C. Keegan is a computational social scientist whose research is at the intersection of human-computer interaction, network science and data science. His research explores the structure and dynamics of large-scale online communication and collaboration using socio-technical system log data. Brian is developing new methods, theories and tools to help people make better sense of bursts of information and design better responses to them. Before joining CU-Boulder as an Assistant Professor, Keegan was a research associate at the Harvard Business School’s HBX online learning platform and a postdoctoral researcher in computational social science at Northeastern University. He received his PhD in media, technology and society from Northwestern University’s School of Communication. He also earned SB degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Science, Technology and Society from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Website
Image of Allison Morgan
Allison Morgan
Allison Morgan is pursuing her Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is interested in using data mining, machine learning, and social network analysis to develop and test hypotheses about the origins and effects of gender imbalance within academia. She attended last year's SICSS and is excited to build a computational social science community at CU Boulder via this satellite. She was recently awarded the National Science Foundation's Graduate Research Fellowship. Prior to graduate school, Allison worked as a data scientist for two years at a small tech start-up in Portland, OR. She earned her B.A. in physics from Reed College.
Website
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Aaron Clauset
Aaron Clauset is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is External Faculty at the Santa Fe Institute. He received a PhD in Computer Science, with distinction, from the University of New Mexico, a BS in Physics, with honors, from Haverford College, and was an Omidyar Fellow at the prestigious Santa Fe Institute. In 2016, he was awarded the Erdos-Renyi Prize in Network Science. Clauset is an internationally recognized expert on network science, computational social science, and machine learning for complex systems. His work has appeared in many prestigious scientific venues, including Nature, Science, PNAS, JACM, WWW, ICWSM, STOC, SIAM Review, and Physical Review Letters. His work has also been covered in the popular press by the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Discover Magazine, New Scientist, Wired, Miller-McCune, the Boston Globe and The Guardian.
Website
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Casey Fiesler
Assistant Professor Casey Fiesler is a social computing researcher who primarily studies governance in online communities, technology ethics, and fandom. She is a Senior Fellow in the Silicon Flatirons Institute for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, an ATLAS fellow, and holds a courtesy appointment in Computer Science. Also a public scholar, she is a frequent commentator and speaker on topics of technology ethics and policy, as well as women in STEM (including consulting with Mattel on their computing-related Barbies). Her work is supported in part by a $3 million collaborative National Science Foundation grant focused on empirical studies of research ethics. Fiesler holds a PhD from Georgia Tech in Human-Centered Computing and a JD from Vanderbilt University Law School.
Website
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Jake Hofman
Jake Hofman is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research in New York City, where he works in the field of computational social science. Prior to joining Microsoft, he was a Research Scientist in the Microeconomics and Social Systems group at Yahoo! Research. He holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Boston University and a Ph.D. in Physics from Columbia University. He is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science at Columbia University and runs Microsoft's Data Science Summer School to promote diversity in computer science. His work has been published in journals such as Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Management Science, and has been featured in popular outlets including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, and The Economist.
Website
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Daniel Larremore
Daniel Larremore is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His research develops statistical and inferential methods for analyzing large-scale network data, and uses those methods to solve applied problems in diverse domains, including public health and academic labor markets. In particular, his work focuses on generative models for networks, the ongoing evolution of the malaria parasite and the origins of social inequalities in academic hiring and careers. Prior to joining the University of Colorado faculty, he was an Omidyar Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute 2015-2017 and a post-doctoral fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health 2012-2015. He obtained his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2012, and holds an undergraduate degree from Washington University in St. Louis.
Website
Image of Yotam Shmargad
Yotam Shmargad
Yotam Shmargad is a computational social scientist with an interest in political networks and privacy. In his research, he runs experiments, links and analyzes large datasets, and uses natural experiments to study how digital media augment the patterns of connectivity between people – the size, density, and diversity of our social networks - and the implications that these bigger networks have for our social and political lives. Shmargad’s recent projects look at how political candidates can overcome financial shortcomings with Twitter, and how the partisan composition of one’s social network influences the information they choose to share online. Before joining the University of Arizona as an Assistant Professor, Shmargad received his PhD in Marketing from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. He holds an MS in Operations Management from Columbia University and a BS in Mathematics from UCLA.
Website
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Amanda Stevenson
Amanda Jean Stevenson is a sociologist trained in demographic and computer science methods. She studies the impacts of and responses to abortion and family planning policy. She is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder. In her current research, she uses demographic methods to study the impacts of reproductive health policies, and computational and qualitative methods to study social responses to these policies. At Boulder she leads a team using massive administrative data at the Census Bureau to evaluate the life course consequences of access to (as opposed to use of) highly effective contraception. And she contributes to a variety of ongoing evaluations of reproductive health policies and develops new strategies for measuring fertility with administrative data. Another line of research examines the social responses to reproductive health policies. In a current project, she uses Twitter responses, website content, media coverage, and in-depth interviews to examine the social movement response to Texas' 2013 abortion restrictions. The case provides an opportunity to investigate how social movements negotiate intersectional critiques from within their ranks.
Website
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Chenhao Tan
Chenhao Tan is an assistant professor of computer science at University of Colorado Boulder. He obtained his PhD degree in the Department of Computer Science at Cornell University and bachelor's degrees in computer science and in economics from Tsinghua University. Prior to joining CU Boulder, he spent a year at University of Washington as a postdoc. His research interests include natural language processing and computational social science. He has published papers primarily at ACL and WWW, and also at KDD, WSDM, ICWSM, etc. His work has been covered by many news media outlets, such as the New York Times and the Washington Post. He also won a Facebook fellowship and a Yahoo! Key Scientific Challenges award.
Website
Image of Zachary Cooper
Zachary Cooper
I am a first year PhD student in Anthropology specializing in Archaeology here at the University of Colorado, Boulder. My advisor is Dr. Scott Ortman and my research interests include ancient migrations, diachronic linguistics, complex systems, and urban scaling.
Angela Cunningham
I am a PhD candidate, expecting to graduate in the winter of 2018. My dissertation focuses on critical military geographies of rural Americans during and after the Great War. Drawing on newly accessible comprehensive individual-level civilian and military data, my research employs the techniques of historical demography and spatial analysis within a theoretical framework of space-time as relative, relational and constitutive to argue that the life courses and relationships of individual soldiers bind home and front and necessitate a more nuanced appreciation of the far-reaching and persistent effects of militaristic ideologies and practices. I have presented portions of my work at the annual meetings of the Social Sciences History Association, American Association of Geographers, and the Population Association of America. My first sole-authored paper, forthcoming in Historical Methods, explores automated record linkage methodologies.
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Ashlynn Daughton
Ashlynn Daughton is an information science PhD student at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is interested in leveraging internet data to better inform public health decision makers. She is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley (BS in molecular biology) and Boston University (MA in public health concentrating in maternal and child health and epidemiology). She works with Michael Paul at CU Boulder, and holds a position at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the Analytics, Intelligence, and Technology Division. Her current research focuses on using machine learning techniques to better understand human behavior, development of decision support tools for public health professionals, and methods to better incorporate Internet and social media data into traditional epidemiological models.
Website
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Emirhan Demirhan
Emirhan Demirhan is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of North Texas. His research interests include democratization, the obstacles to the functioning of democracies, and manipulation of public opinion using computational and quantitative methods. In his dissertation, Emirhan focuses on how Turkish democratization failed as a result of unrestrained defiance to the status quo, which led to the destruction of institutions.
Website
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Alia Gant
Alia Gant is currently a Diversity Resident Librarian at Penn State University. Prior to joining the university, Ms. Gant studied information science at the University of Texas at Austin where she focused her studies on academic librarianship. Ms. Gant also studied international studies in her graduate and undergraduate programs at the University of Iowa and American University respectively with an emphasis on Western Hemisphere studies and the European Union, focusing on Portuguese speaking countries, Brazil and Portugal. Alia is looking forward to the Summer Institute in Computational Social Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder! She hopes to learn more about CSS and also avenues to intersect her librarianship skills with computational social science methods to enrich her professional and academic research goals.
Pavel Goldstein

Website
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Jordan Hale
Jordan Hale is a Ph.D. candidate in the political science department at CU Boulder. Her research generally focuses on the impact of political institutions on norms of behavior, especially norms related to identity and globalization. Her dissertation asks specifically how different electoral systems impact the incentives for elites to politicize identity.
Image of Xiaowen Hu
Xiaowen Hu
Xiaowen Hu is currently a 2nd year PhD student in Finance at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
Website
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Juhi Huda
Juhi is a doctoral candidate in the Environmental Studies Program (policy core) at CU Boulder. She studies environmental policy and governance in the United States and India focusing on policy change in areas of food systems governance (agricultural biotechnology), disaster and hazards (wildfire), and climate change; and factors influencing policy change such as communication, advocacy, and stakeholders. Her dissertation research investigates the controversial issue of agricultural biotechnology policy in India.
Website
Image of Eaman Jahani
Eaman Jahani
Eaman Jahani is a graduate research assistant pursuing a PhD degree in Social and Engineering Systems with a minor in Statistics at MIT IDSS. Prior to MIT, he was a software engineer at Google for 4 years. His main training is in statistics and computer science, but recently he has been appreciating econometrics and modeling in applied economics. His past research examined the extent of bubbles vs truth-seeking in cryptocurrency markets and socio-economic prediction in social networks. His current research focuses on structural factors such as networks or institutions that contribute to persistence of inequality.
Image of Vivian Lai
Vivian Lai
I am a Ph.D. student in Computer Science at the University of Colorado Boulder advised by Chenhao Tan. I study how to empower humans to make better decisions with machine's assistance. More broadly, I am interested in computational social science, natural language processing, and machine learning.
Website
Anais Landry

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Stefani Langehennig
Stefani Langehennig is a PhD candidate at the University of Colorado Boulder studying American politics and political methodology. Her research focuses on institutions, policy making, and congressional organization. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Government at the University of Texas at Austin and her Masters of Science in Political Science at the University of Nebraska Omaha.
Website
Image of Eun Lee
Eun Lee
I've just finished my Ph.D. in South Korea about the structural inequality and its effects on the dynamics. I am a huge fan of Complex system group in Colorado, so I applied the summer school to meet and learn from the group. My passion is to understand the effect of heterogeneous characteristics of social network and people's attribute on human behavior and perception.
Website
Image of Huyen Le
Huyen Le
I am a Vietnam Education Foundation (VEF) fellow and a PhD student in Computer Science at the University of Iowa since Fall 2013. Since Fall 2015 I have worked under the supervision of professor Zubair Shafiq. My research interests are Social Media Analysis, Text Mining, and Applied Machine Learning. I received my M.S. in Computer Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, South Korea in 2012 and my B.S. in Computer Science, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Vietnam in 2010.
Website
Image of Ningzi Li
Ningzi Li
My research interests include organizational theory, economic sociology and non-market strategy. I particularly focus on integrated market and non-market strategies and online community management. I received doctoral degree in sociology from Cornell University.
Website
Image of Nicholas Light
Nicholas Light
Nick is a PhD Student in the Marketing division at the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business. Broadly his research focuses on consumer judgement and decision making. Specifically, Nick studies consumer perceptions of understanding, simplicity/complexity, and anti-science beliefs.
Website
Image of Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey
Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey
I am a PhD student in the Environmental Studies (ENVS) and Environmental Design (ENVD) programs at CU Boulder. I work at the nexus of science, policy and natural resource management. I am particularly interested in collaborative governance approaches to managing interactions between humans and the rest of the natural world. My dissertation research focuses on understanding the role and evolution of network approaches to collaborative governance. My graduate research examines whether and how social learning networks build and foster adaptive capacity and resilience during transitions in complex social-environmental systems. I am currently working with the Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network (FAC Net). I have diverse skillset with a background that include statistics, ecology, behavioral interactions, community structure, impacts of introduced species, science communication, and policy and planning. At CU Boulder, I teach methods and planning courses in the ENVD program and have research appointments in the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR) and the Institute of Behavioral Science (IBS). Before joining the Goldstein lab at CU Boulder, I worked for >15 years as an aquatic/landscape ecologist with Federal and State agencies, universities and private and non-profit consulting firms throughout the Western United States. I earned an Honors Bachelor of Science degree in Fisheries and Wildlife (2003), a Master of Science in Quantitative Fish Ecology (2005), and a Master of Public Policy (2016) from Oregon State University. I enjoy spending time in the great outdoors with my partner and kids, friends and animals. My favorite activities include camping, backpacking, fishing, hunting, forest foraging, SCUBA diving, fly tying, traveling, photography, reading, gardening, geocaching, and homebrewing/distilling.
Website
Marie Ouellet

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Anthony Pinter
Anthony T. Pinter is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Information Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. He works with Dr. Jed R. Brubaker and the Identity Lab at CU, investigating online audiences' role in identity disclosure and trans experiences in social media. Prior to CU, he completed his B.S. and M.S. in Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State, where he worked with Dr. Lynette Kvasny Yarger on research related to discrimination in STEM fields. In his free time, he is a prolific music consumer, avid mountain biker, and a high school track coach.
Website
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Katherine Runge
Katherine L. Runge is a PhD student of political science at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her first field of study is American politics, and her second field of study is research methodology. Her specific areas of research focus on gender and politics in the American context, along with political psychology and voter behavior.
Website
Image of Qiaoni Shi
Qiaoni Shi
Qiaoni Shi is a PhD student in Marketing at University of Pittsburgh. She is broadly interested in applying computational social science method to understand consumer behavior and provide insights for firms. She is currently working on a project about platform strategy design.
Website
Image of Sarah Shugars
Sarah Shugars
A doctoral candidate in Northeastern's Network Science program, Sarah uses network analysis and natural language processing to study political dialogue and deliberation. Her research focuses on developing a network methodology for deliberation; modeling the way an individual reasons as a network of interconnected ideas and studying deliberation as process in which groups exchange ideas and collectively create new solutions. She received a BA cum laude in Physics from Clark University and an MA in Integrated Marketing Communications from Emerson College. She currently serves as senior editor for the Good Society: The Journal of Civic Studies and previously worked at Tufts University's Tisch College of Civic Life.
Website
Image of Tara Streng Schroeter
Tara Streng Schroeter
I am a second year graduate student at the University of Colorado Boulder working towards my Ph.D. in Sociology. After completing my Bachelor's degree at the University of Utah I became interested in programming and data science, and curious to explore the ways that these fields can enhance my skills as a social researcher. I am currently working on research related to health, mortality, campus sexual assault, and relevant policies.
Website
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Becca Wang
Becca Wang is a doctoral student in Sociology at Brown University, where she is also affiliated with the Population Studies and Training Center. Her research utilizes longitudinal analysis techniques to examine how population mobility is related to gender inequality, health, and urbanization. She also explores how computational methods and textual data can improve our understanding of social change over time. Prior to graduate school, she worked at Mathematica Policy Research and Mercy Corps.
Website
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Sari Widman
Sari Widman explores alternative models for STEM and digital literacy education for learners of all ages. Her research centers the development of equitable and humanizing practices in informal learning spaces, and how families and communities engage with educational opportunities and resources. Her current work focuses on multi and intergenerational learning in community settings, with a particular focus on libraries. She is currently a PhD student at the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, in Learning Sciences and Human Development.
Rumei Yang
Rumei (May) Yang, an international nursing Ph.D. student from China. My early research interest mainly focused on the patient safety, including fall prevention, medication errors and risk management using evidence-based practice models. My current interest of research is focusing on the quality of care for the elderly. Skiing, hiking, and swimming are my favorite activities.
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Matthew Yarbrough
Matthew Yarbrough is a doctoral student at the University of Colorado-Boulder. His primary field of research is American Politics and minor field of Political Methodology. Previously graduating with Bachelors in Political Science, History, and International Affairs from the University of Georgia, Matthew's research focuses on gender differences in legislative behavior in the US Congress. Additional research focuses include congressional committee politics, LGBTQ politics, and political ambition within minority communities. In addition to his role as a student, Matthew serves as a Tri-Chair of the Chancellor's Advisory on Gender and Sexuality at CU-Boulder.
Website
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Tzu-Chi Yen
Tzu-Chi is pursuing his Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Colorado Boulder. He is interested in problems that have some statistics flavor; for example, clustering of a network and error estimation of a novel survey method. Prior to graduate school, Tzu-Chi has lived in Beijing for three years as a software engineer (Python/JavaScript) at a tech startup, as a visiting student in the Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and most recently as a data analyst at an environmental NGO. He has founded the [Network Science Education Initiative in Taiwan](https://netscied.tw), whose goal is to make network science accessible and _fun_ for all abilities. He holds a BS in Biology from National Taiwan University.
Website
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Joseph Zamadics
Hello, I am Joe Zamadics. I am a political science PhD candidate at the University of Colorado with a focus in American politics and political methodology. Specifically, my dissertation focuses on issue salience in lawmaking. By analyzing state newspaper content, I am able to link trends in issue salience to lawmaker actions and policy outcomes. I am originally from West Chester, PA which is 30 minutes outside the city of Philadelphia, home of the Super Bowl LII Champion Philadelphia Eagles. I graduated from Susquehanna University in 2012 with a B.S. in Economics. I obtained an M.A. in political science from the University of Colorado in 2014.
Website
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Kai Zhu
I am currently a PhD student in Information Systems at Boston University. I am broadly interested in applying computational method to understand and solve social science problems, with a special focus on bias, inequality and polarization in digital systems. I am currently working on a project in which I try to identify and understand partisan slant and political polarization in local TV news using large-scale unstructured text data, i.e. the complete transcript of televised news from around 800 TV stations across all US Designated Market Areas for a period of approximately six years (2012~2018). In a previous study, I investigated the co-evolution of attention and content production in online collaborative systems such as Wikipedia. Specifically, we leverage a large-scale natural experiment to study how exogenous content contributions to a Wikipedia article causally affect the attention it attracts and how that attention spills over to other articles in the network.

University of Helsinki

All Participants


Image of Matti Nelimarkka
Matti Nelimarkka
Matti Nelimarkka is a postdoc at the Department of Computer Science, Aalto University and instructor at the Faculty of Social Science, University of Helsinki. His research examines the intersections of political science and data science as well as political science and human-computer interaction. His current work focuses on racism in hybrid media systems, circulation of news, political polarization, agendas in political communication, power of algorithmic systems and politics in human-computer interaction.
Website
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Momo the Robot
We visit Futurice, a software company in Helsinki. They tell when Momo the Robot met children.
Website
Image of Minna Ruckenstein
Minna Ruckenstein
Minna Ruckenstein is an associate professor at the Consumer Society Research Centre and the Helsinki Center for Digital Humanities, University of Helsinki. She is the principal investigator of various research projects that explore and develop data-related practices and study aspects of digitalization. Ongoing research projects utilize digital methods in exploring topical and emotional rhythms and patterns in social media discussions, study children's cell phone uses, practices of content moderation and data activism.
Website
Image of Veikko Eranti
Veikko Eranti
Veikko Eranti is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Tampere. His work has focused on the intersection of societies and technological development, mainly democracy and participation. His ongoing research is focused on citizenship and political culture using methodological triangulation – combining ethnography and survey data with computational analysis. He holds a PhD in sociology and MA in Literature, both from the University of Helsinki.
Website
Image of Marta Kołczyńska
Marta Kołczyńska
Marta Kołczyńska received her Ph.D. in sociology from The Ohio State University in 2017 and now is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Philosophy and Sociology of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Her research examines the causes and consequences of political attitudes and behavior, in particular the effects of educational stratification of these attitudes and behaviors on democracy, in cross-national perspective. She is also exploring the opportunities of ex-post harmonization of cross-national survey data.
Image of Seraphine F. Maerz
Seraphine F. Maerz
Seraphine Maerz is a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Freiburg, Germany. Her research concentrates on the survival strategies of authoritarian regimes in Central Asia and beyond. She is particularly interested in how autocratic leaders use the Internet to justify and stabilize their rule. Her current research project compares the language of leaders from authoritarian regimes and democracies by using quantitative text analysis. Seraphine received her PhD from Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, Hungary.
Website
Image of Arpita Biswas
Arpita Biswas
Arpita Biswas is a Google PhD Fellow at the Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science. Her broad areas of interests include Algorithmic Game Theory, Machine Learning and Optimization. She is presently looking at problems in Computational Social Choice Theory and Fairness in Machine Learning. In Computational Social Choice Theory, she is working on the existence and hardness of various fairness notions while partitioning indivisible goods among agents. She has prior experience in multi-agent learning (multi-armed bandit), incentive mechanisms, facility location, planning and scheduling etc. and thus far she has worked on problems arising from real-world scenarios like online crowd-sourcing, resource allocation, dynamic pricing in transportation etc.
Website
Image of Anders Grundtvig
Anders Grundtvig
Anders Grundtvig is a Master student at Aalborg University where he study Techno-Anthropology. His field of interest is STS (Science and Technology Studies) where he uses digital methods to map and understand human behaviour and social interactions. His educational backbone builds on physical fieldworking and theories about interdisciplinarity and user-driven research. This backbone has reseantly been combined with digital methods that opens new forms of investigation where the quali-quanti is mixed together with digital-analouge research oppunities. He has reseantly been working on the project 'A Field Guide to fake news' that investigated how we can understand the ecosystems of fake news rather than just debunking them when found. And is now working on a project about personal digital data and trust
Image of Ilse Pit
Ilse Pit
Ilse Pit is a PhD candidate at the University of Amsterdam, at the department of Communication Science. She is broadly interested in how behaviour online might be (or might not be) different from offline behaviour. In her PhD project, she focuses on how people use visual means to express themselves with brands online. Specifically, she uses computer vision and manual methods to investigate brand representation in user-generated content on Instagram. She is further interested in statistics and (increasing) open science practices.
Image of Erjon Skenderi
Erjon Skenderi
Erjon Skenderi was awarded a Master's degree by Queens College CUNY. He is pursuing a doctoral degree at the Tampere University of Technology. Currently he is working as a researcher for the Big Match Project, facilitated by the Tampere University of Technology and University of Tampere. His research is focused on developing new approaches to model individuals based on data they generated online, i.e Big Social Data.
Image of Hannes Rosenbusch
Hannes Rosenbusch
Hannes Rosenbusch is a PhD candidate in the Social Psychology department at Tilburg University. His research interests include the application of data science methods such as machine learning to psychological research.
Image of Yunus Emre Tapan
Yunus Emre Tapan
Yunus Emre Tapan is a master student in Middle East Studies at Middle East Technical University. His main area of interests are social network analysis and digital anthropology. In his MA thesis, he focuses on the extremists groups in online sphere. As an area studies student, He choses online sphere, specifically Twitter, as a fieldwork. He worked as a research assistant in a couple of funded projects inquiring on online radicalization and employing computational social science methods.
Image of Saana Rantanen
Saana Rantanen
Saana Rantanen is a student in Sociology at the University of Turku, Finland. Currently she is studying lifestyle values of European parents in the different family structures and legal contexts. She is a social scientist with an interdisciplinary approach with curiosity of how machine learning can be applied to causal inference. Her research interests includes social inequality, social structures and mechanisms, sustainable development and futures studies.
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Florian Wanders
Florian Wanders is a doctoral student in Work and Organizational Psychology at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. His research focuses on the social dynamics surrounding norm violations and intersects with psychology, behavioral economics, and political science. Next to his research he teaches statistics to bachelor and master students, and helps analyze data for his lab. Prior to his PhD candidacy, he received a B.A. in cognitive neuroscience and an M.Sc. in organizational psychology.
Website
Image of Polina Rozenshtein
Polina Rozenshtein
Polina Rozenshtein is a last-year PhD student in Data Mining group of Aalto University. She received her MSc in Machine Learning and Data Mining from Aalto University in 2014. Her research interests include dynamic graph mining and social-networks analysis.
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Jayesh Prakash Gupta
Jayesh Prakash Gupta, B.Eng., M.Sc. (Tech.) is a PhD Fellow at DARE Business Data Research Group & Novi Research Center, Laboratory of Industrial and Information Management at Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland. He is working in the field of computational social science. His research currently focuses on enhancing collaboration in different contexts by identifying weak tie from Big Social Data using analytics method like social network analysis, social set analysis. He is the recipient of a four year full-time fellowship from Tampere University of Technology Foundation for his Doctoral work.
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Olli Kupiainen
Olli is a PhD candidate in Aalto University, Department of Industrial Engineering and Management. He has studied organizational mergers. Currently he is studying a large-scale strategic change and how organizational members experience the change and make sense of the change through their discussion on enterprise social media platform. His research interests include applying text mining methods to his research. His background is in social and organizational psychology (BSc in psychology and MSc in social and organizational psychology). He is also a trained psychology teacher.
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Kelsey LaMere
Kelsey LaMere is a second year PhD student with the Doctoral Program in Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences (DENVI) at the University of Helsinki. Her interests include stakeholder participation in decision-making, the intersection between science and policy, and environmental risk assessment, particularly in the context of aquatic natural resources. Kelsey’s current work involves the use of problem framing with fishery stakeholders to determine the potential effects of climate change on salmon and the salmon fishery. Additionally, she is currently working on a project exploring the differences in the perception of risk and risk assessment between scientific disciplines.
Image of Sami Kotiranta
Sami Kotiranta
Sami Kotiranta is a political science doctoral student at the University of Helsinki with a research focus on data-informed decision-making and public sector leadership. He’s working as a research assistant at the United Nations University Word Institute of Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) contributing mainly to the maintenance of a large government revenue dataset.
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Robin Lybeck
Robin Lybeck is a PhD Candidate at the sociology department of Åbo Akademi University in Turku, Finland. The theme of his thesis is digital participation in urban planning. Currently, he is finishing a project involving the use of machine learning for the analysis of sentiment and themes in citizen feedback. Previously he has worked on a research project involving mobile participation applications in Turku University and Örebro University.
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Magnus Hanstén
Magnus Hanstén is a MSc student at the University of Helsinki where he study environmental sciences. His research interests include the field of marine resource management and marine spatial planning, fields which combine both the management of human behaviour and the environmental aspects. He is a firm believer in interdisciplinarity when it comes to developing systems where humans and nature can coexist in a sustainable manner. He is currently working on a study regarding the social dimensions of a fisheries management system called individual transferable quotas (ITQ). His study will consist of a comparison between Finland, Sweden and Denmark, which all are using ITQs for managing their fisheries.
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Emilia Luoma
Emilia Luoma is a PhD student in the Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences (DENVI) in the University of Helsinki. In her PhD, she studies, how the sustainability of maritime traffic and the related activities in the Gulf of Finland can be improved. Graphical causal networks are used as the tool for formulating and visualizing the systemic thinking of stakeholders. The thesis consists of two case studies related to (1) the mitigation of the probability and consequences of an oil accident and (2) defining and gaining the objectives for sustainable leisure boating in the Gulf of Finland.
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Juho Pääkkönen
Juho Pääkkönen is a doctoral student in Science and Technology studies and a computer science major student at the University of Helsinki. His work focuses understanding epistemologies of big data and objectivity claims in computational data analysis. He has also been involved in the analysis of racism discourse in Finnish media and social media.
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Pihla Toivanen
Pihla Toivanen is a student in Master's programme in Data Science, University of Helsinki. Her work currently focuses on understanding media ecologies in Finland and internationally. She has also been employed as software developer at Futurice and Nokia Corporation.

University of Chicago

All Participants


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Kat Albrecht
Kat Albrecht is pursuing a PhD in Sociology at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on investigating how the structure of data shapes research conclusions and broader sociological theory. Using machine learning methods, quantitative causal inference, and mapping techniques she primarily builds and analyzes large criminal justice datasets. She is especially concerned with the economics of fear, the working definition of homicide, and the general state of crime data. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota where she first began exploring the junction of computational methods and the social sciences.
Website
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Joshua Becker
Joshua Becker defended his PhD at the University of Pennsylvania and will be starting as a postdoctoral fellow with the Kellogg School of Management and the Northwestern Institute of Complex Systems. His research on collective intelligence uses formal models and experimental tests to examine how social network structure shapes group decisions. His current research focuses on how communication networks can be harnessed to tap the wisdom of crowds and improve estimation accuracy on tasks such as financial forecasting, political beliefs, and medical diagnoses.
Website
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Jeremy Foote
Jeremy Foote is a PhD candidate in the Media, Technology, and Society program at Northwestern. He is a member of the [Community Data Science Collective](https://communitydata.cc). Using computational social science tools like social network analysis and simulation, he researches how people cooperate to create online collective goods, focusing particularly on how new projects get started and which ones grow.
Website
Live Stream
Matt Salganik, Chris Bail, Deen Freelon, David Lazer, Kristian Lum, Sendhil Mullainathan, Cynthia Rudin, and Duncan Watts.
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Ned Smith
Ned Smith is an Associate Professor of Management and Organizations at the Kellogg School of Management, Associate Professor (by courtesy) of Sociology, core faculty member of the Northwestern Institute for Complexity (NICO), and faculty associate at the Northwestern Institute for Policy Research.
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Sheena Erete
Sheena is an assistant professor in the College of Computing and Digital Media at DePaul University in Chicago, IL. Sheena co-directs the Technology for Social Good | Research and Design Lab with Dr. Denise Nacu.
Image of Agnes Horvat
Agnes Horvat
Ágnes Horvát is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, an affiliated faculty of the Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems (NICO), and the Department of Management and Organizations of the Kellogg School of Management (by courtesy).
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Alex Engler
Alex is the Program Director and a Lecturer for the M.S. in Computational Analysis and Public Policy degree at the University of Chicago. In addition to teaching courses on Data Visualization and Large Scale Data Methods for policy research, he is a contributing Data Scientist at the Urban Institute.
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Rayid Ghani
Rayid Ghani is the Director of the Center for Data Science & Public Policy and a Senior Fellow at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and the Computation Institute.
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Anna McKean
Anna McKean is a joint PhD student in Management & Organizations and Sociology. Her research interests include social movements, organizational change and influence, and non-market strategy. Currently, her research focuses on how corporations respond to, participate in, and influence social and political activism and policy change.
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Basak Taraktas
Basak is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Northwestern University. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania in 2016. Her research centers on collective action and conflict. Much of her work is set in the context of regimes, contentious politics, and international economy, where she combines computational methods, network analysis, and qualitative methods. Basak’s co-authored chapter, When Does Repression Trigger Mass Protest?, was acknowledged by Cornell University with the 2015 Sidney Tarrow Best Article Prize for a paper written by a graduate student in the field of contentious politics or in European politics, sociology or history.
Image of Daniel Trielli
Daniel Trielli
Daniel Trielli​ is a PhD student at the Media, Technology and Society program at Northwestern. He is researching computational journalism and how news reaches the public in our increasingly algorithmically-defined world.
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Dustin Stoltz
Dustin Stoltz is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Notre Dame and a Doctoral Affiliate with the Kellogg Institute for International Studies. He researches the production, distribution, consumption, and consequences of ideas, specifically ideas about the economy. As part of his dissertation, he applies network analysis and text analysis to a unique dataset of management consultants working in North America and Southeast Asia and the numerous articles they write.
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Elizabeth Trudeau
Libby Trudeau earned her MA from the University of Chicago and is currently working on a PhD in sociology at the University of Notre Dame. Her research focusses on cultural meaning-making particularly around the social construction of gender and sexuality. Her current projects focus on discourses regarding sex work and human trafficking in the U.S. She is excited about using mixed- methods techniques to gain creative insights.
Image of Hanlin Li
Hanlin Li
Hanlin Li is a Ph.D. student in the Technology and Social Behavior program at Northwestern University. She is a member of the People, Space, and Algorithms Research Group. She studies how individuals and organizations use technology to support social causes. Taking mixed methods approaches, she designs, builds, and tests civic technologies that empower collective action online.
Image of Hee Youn Kwon
Hee Youn Kwon
Hee Youn Kwon received her PhD in Systems and Entrepreneurial Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in May 2018. At the University of Illinois, she had worked as a research and teaching assistant in the Department of Industrial and Enterprise Systems Engineering (ISE), the Computational Science and Engineering Program (CSE), and the Department of Computer Science (CS). She wrote her PhD dissertation on new developments in causal inference using Balance Optimization Subset Selection under supervision of Professor Sheldon H. Jacobson. Prior to Illinois, she received a B.S. in Mathematical Sciences from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and an M.Phil. in Economics from University of Oxford.
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Igor Zakhlebin
Igor Zakhlebin is pursuing a PhD in Technology and Social Behavior, a joint program in Computer Science and Communications at Northwestern University. His current projects study how crowds of people come together to produce new cultural works and how they collectively pay attention to them. To answer these questions, Igor performs large-scale data analyses and builds computational tools to support them. His methods of choice are network analysis, machine learning, and computational modeling.
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Iva Terwilliger
Iva Terwilliger is a PhD student in the Health Sciences Integrated PhD Program (HSIP) with a concentration in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety. She studies teamwork in healthcare and is part of Nick Soulakis' lab. Iva is interested in using mixed methods to better understand how teamwork can be better utilized to improve the quality of patient care. Before coming to Northwestern, Iva worked as an RN at the VA and NYU Langone.
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Jeremiah Bohr
Jeremiah Bohr is currently an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, and received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research focuses on climate change denial (both in terms of organization and individual attitudes), household energy use and energy insecurity, and text analysis. He is currently using computational methods to study the communication of climate change by politicians on social media.
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Josey VanOrsdale
Josey VanOrsdale is currently a doctoral student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the sociology department. Her research interests are in biosociology, minority health disparities, and quantitative and computational methods. Her most recent research has encapsulated these interests by looking at the subbaccalaureate education level within the education-health gradient. For the past year, she has also worked as part of the LifeHD lab at the University of Nebraska. She has recently joined and looks forward to contributing to the Research, Evaluation, & Analysis for Community Health (REACH) lab.
Image of Kyosuke Tanaka
Kyosuke Tanaka
Kyosuke Tanaka is a Ph.D. student in the Media, Technology, and Society program at Northwestern University. He is interested in network perception and cognition. His recent research explores how people decode, recall and learn the social networks around them.
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Roland Adorjani
Roland Adorjani is a Ph.D. Candidate in the School of Sociology at University College Dublin. My dissertation focuses on large-scale discourse analysis of e-therapy conversations. His project is also linked to collaborations with enterprise partners in the mental e-health domain. Other research interests include large-scale social media discourse analysis of Twitter hashtag campaigns and science of science. Prior to graduate school, he worked as a data scientist at opening.io.
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Sarah Otner
Sarah Otner is a Research Fellow in the Strategy & Organizational Behavior group at Imperial College Business School (London, UK). Her research uses economic sociology and social psychology in order to understand the mechanisms and the consequences of social status. Sarah's research focuses on prestige and expertise, and especially award competitions; her current research projects examine prize scarcity, prize sharing, establishing new prizes, and prize refusals.
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Seyed Mohamad Hosseinioun
Mohamad Hosseinioun is pursuing a Ph.D. in Management Information Systems at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has received his bachelor's and master's degrees in Industrial and Systems Engineering and his research focuses on Causal Inference and Prediction in Complex and Dynamic Systems. Using Statistical and Fuzzy Machine Learning methods, Network Analysis, and Econometrics he investigates the behavior of social and economic entities. He is especially interested in collective realities and collective decision making, where the outcome of the "whole" is significantly altered by the interconnected behavior of the "individual"s.
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Shu Fu
Shu Fu is a third-year PhD at the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago. He studies American politics and political methodology. His research interests include American presidency, election, and public opinion. He is also interested in machine learning and causal inference in methods. He is currently working on multiple research projects. One project is related to the presidential partisan particularism, explaining how and why American presidents impact distributive politics and allocate disproportionately more federal funds toward their core states. Another project is to use advanced textual analysis to understand how first ladies communicate with the public. His dissertation is on American presidential public appeals and party building.
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Yian Yin
Yian Yin is currently a PhD candidate of Industrial Engineering & Management Sciences (IEMS) at McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Northwestern University. He is also affiliated to Social Complexity group at Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems (NICO). His current research lies in the boundary of data mining, complex systems and computational social science, with a focus on understanding successes and failures in individual career from large-scale datasets. He received his bachelor's degrees in Statistics and Economics from Peking University in 2016.
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Yini Zhang
Yini Zhang is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin Madison. She studies how emergent communication technologies impact the dynamics and outcomes of political communication. Her research mainly concerns agency, algorithms, and attention in the hybrid media system. She is also interested in media psychology such as hostile media and fact-check effects in the new media environment. She does mixed method research by applying both traditional communication research methods, such as survey and experiment, and computational methods, such as social network clustering and topic modeling, to mining insights about individual communication and media system in an ever evolving media landscape.
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Yixue Wang
Yixue Wang is a Ph.D. student in Technology and Social Behavior program at Northwestern University, a joint program between the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Communication Studies. Her research interests are in computational social science, computational journalism, and data science for social good. She is particularly interested in how social networks, media exposure, and geospatial environment influence propagation, reinforcement, or polarization of ideas and attitudes using network analysis, machine learning and geospatial analysis. She is a member of Data Science fellow at Northwestern Data Science Initiative.
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Diego Gómez-Zará
Diego Gómez-Zará is a Ph.D. Student in the Technology and Social Behavior program at Northwestern University. He is a graduate research assistant of the SONIC Lab. He researches how team assembly is supported by technologies, diffusion of information through social media, and social network analysis.

Duke University

All Participants


Image of Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and he is affiliated with several of Princeton's interdisciplinary research centers: the Office for Population Research, the Center for Information Technology Policy, the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research interests include social networks and computational social science. He is the author of the forthcoming book *Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.*
Website
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Chris Bail
Chris Bail is the Douglas and Ellen Lowey Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University and a member of the Interdisciplinary Program on Data Science, the Duke Network Analysis Center, and the Duke Population Research Institute. His research examines how non-profit organiations and other political actors shape social media discourse using large text-based datasets and apps for social science research. He is the author of *Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream*.
Website
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Deen Freelon
Deen Freelon is an Associate Professor in the School of Media and Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and directs the Computational Communication Research Lab.
Website
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Kieran Healy
Kieran Healy is Associate Professor of Sociology at Duke University. He's affiliated with the Kenan Institute for Ethics, the Markets and Management Studies program, and the Duke Network Analysis Center.
Website
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David Lazer
David Lazer is Professor of Political Science and Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University & Harvard University.
Website
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Monica Lee
Monica Lee is a Data Scientist at Facebook who works on Civic Engagement and Election Integrity. Her research leverages social network analysis and machine learning to combat election related social media abuse and to develop tools for civic empowerment.
Website
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Kristian Lum
Kristian Lum is the Lead Statistician at the Human Rights Data Analysis Group (HRDAG), where she leads the HRDAG project on criminal justice in the United States.
Website
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Sendhil Mullainathan
Sendhil Mullainathan is the Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics at Harvard University and the co-founder of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab.
Website
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Duncan Watts
Duncan Watts is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and a founding member of the MSR-NYC lab. He is also an AD White Professor at Large at Cornell University.
Website
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Emily Bello-Pardo
Emily D. Bello-Pardo is a doctoral student at American University. Her work examines the attitudinal impacts of online dis- and mis- information, online discursive incivility, and public policy shifts, and uses experimental and computational social science approaches to explore these topics in the US and Latin America. In 2017, Bello-Pardo was a Google NewsLab Fellow at Pew Research Center. Before her PhD, Bello-Pardo obtained a MA in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and dual Bachelor degrees in Political Science and International Relations from Florida International University.
Website
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Nicolò Cavalli
Nicolò is a DPhil candidate in Sociology at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. He holds a BA in Politics from University of Bologna and a MSc in Economics from Bocconi University, Milan. Before joining Nuffield College, Nicolò worked as journalist, reporting on social issues and political movements from Italy, Greece, Catalunya, California and Peru. His Doctoral Thesis focuses on how intergroup emotional stratification emerged in Europe in times of economic recession.
Website
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Lily Fesler
Lily Fesler is a doctoral student in economics of education at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and an Institute of Education Sciences (IES) fellow. Her research interests include student and teacher bias in higher education and barriers to college access. Methodologically, she is very interested in using text analysis to better understand student's college experiences (and started the Stanford student-led group Computational Text Analysis in the Social Sciences). Before coming to Stanford, Lily worked as an education analyst at Abt Associates and as an analyst at an economic consulting firm in Boston. She received her bachelor's degree from Wesleyan University.
Website
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Natalie Gallagher
Natalie Gallagher is currently pursuing a PhD in psychology at Northwestern University. Her work lies at the intersection of social and cognitive research, including network cognition, social categories, and a flexible sense of self. She draws on psychological, sociological, and computational methods to pursue her questions, and is interested in how research can inform social change. Natalie received her BA in psychology and theater from Georgetown University.
Image of Ryan J. Gallagher
Ryan J. Gallagher
Ryan J. Gallagher is a PhD student at Northeastern University. At the Network Science Institute, he researches the dynamics of social networks using tools and theory from natural language processing and communications. He currently studies the affective phenomena of networked counterpublics. Ryan holds an MS in mathematics from the University of Vermont, where he worked with the Computational Story Lab at the Vermont Complex Systems Center, and a BA in math from the University of Connecticut.
Website
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Douglas Guilbeault
Douglas Guilbeault is a PhD candidate in the Network Dynamics Group at the University of Pennsylvania. His research uses formal models and online experiments to study political communication and cultural evolution. His recent work focuses on the effects of political polarization on collective intelligence. Doug is funded by a PhD scholarship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, as well as by a dissertation fellowship from the Institute for Research on Innovation and Science. He has a background in philosophy, linguistics, and cognitive science.
Website
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David Hagmann
David is a PhD candidate in Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University and a visiting scholar at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. His interests include information avoidance, behavioral interventions (nudges), and decisions from experience. In his dissertation, David studies persuasion in the presence of motivated reasoning. While we might think that changing someone’s mind is all about exposing them to facts that support our views and challenge theirs, such an approach may be more likely to engender defensive information avoidance rather than receptive information processing.
Website
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Katherine Hoffmann Pham
Katherine Hoffmann Pham is a PhD candidate in Information Systems at the NYU Stern School of Business. Her research focuses on applications of big data to international development and policy problems; her current projects study transportation mode choice in New York City and migration patterns in the Central Mediterranean. She is also interested in how machine learning can be applied to causal inference. Previously, she worked on randomized controlled trials with Innovations for Poverty Action and completed a co-terminal degree in International Relations, Economics, and International Policy Studies at Stanford.
Website
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David Holtz
David Holtz is a PhD student in the Information Technology group at MIT Sloan. His research interests span online marketplace design, causal inference, applied machine learning, and network science. His work thus far has focused on ratings and reviews, as well as the viability of reputation systems that don’t depend on user generated feedback. He holds an MA in Physics & Astronomy from Johns Hopkins University and a BA in Physics from Princeton University. Prior to beginning his PhD, David was a data scientist (most recently at Airbnb).
Website
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Eaman Jahani
Eaman Jahani is a graduate research assistant pursuing a PhD degree in Social and Engineering Systems with a minor in Statistics at MIT IDSS. Prior to MIT, he was a software engineer at Google for 4 years. His main training is in statistics and computer science, but recently he has been appreciating econometrics and modeling in applied economics. His past research examined the extent of bubbles vs truth-seeking in cryptocurrency markets and socio-economic prediction in social networks. His current research focuses on structural factors such as networks or institutions that regenerate inequality at a micro scale. Eaman spends too much time reading political commentaries.
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Carly Knight
Carly Knight is completing her PhD in Sociology at Harvard University. Her work applies quantitative and computational methods to questions of historical and cultural change. Her primary research interest concerns the evolution of attitudes towards the market and the development of organizational market actors. She is also broadly interested in political sociology, law and regulation, markets and moral classification, and computational analysis. In the Fall, she will begin as an Assistant Professor at New York University.
Website
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Elena Labzina
Elena is a graduating Ph.D. student in PolSci at WashU in St Louis. Soon, she is joining the Lab of Law&Economics at ETH Zurich as a postdoc in PolSci, Econ, and Data Analysis. Also, she holds MAs in PolSci, Econ, and Stats. Her BSc is in Applied Math and CompSci from Lomonosov State in Moscow, Russia. Elena’s research concerns the interdisciplinary studies that apply advanced data methods to questions related to information security, media freedom, development, and environmental issues.
Website
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Tina Law
Tina Law is a Ph.D. student in sociology at Yale. Her research explores how big data and computational social science can be used to advance the study of racial inequality in U.S. cities and neighborhoods. She is particularly interested in applying and integrating techniques from analyses of social networks, text corpora, and emotions in order to generate new insights into longstanding issues of urban racial inequality. Her ongoing work is supported by the National Science Foundation’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program. She will be continuing her studies at Northwestern in fall 2018.
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Yan Leng
Yan is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at Human Dynamics group at MIT. She received dual masters in Computer Science and Transportation Engineering from MIT in 2016. Yan is interested in using a broad range of computational techniques to understand the network effect of social influence. In particular, she works on the inference, identification, and modeling of social influence and social learning with large-scale behavioral data in a networked environment. Besides, she also works on the combining network structure and personal attributes in maximizing cascading payoff.
Website
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Jeff Lockhart
Jeff Lockhart is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Michigan. Before coming to Michigan, he completed a masters in computer science at Fordham University and a masters in gender studies at the University of Cambridge. His research seeks to integrate computational tools with critical insight from feminist and queer theory.
Website
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Julien Migozzi
Julien Migozzi is a PhD Candidate in Urban & Economic Geography at the University of Grenoble Alpes and a Lecturer & Research Assistant at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris. His research investigates how the real estate market reshapes patterns of social stratification and neighborhood change in emerging cities of the Global South, with a specific focus on Cape Town, South Africa. He is particularly interested in the intersection of housing market, financialization and inequalities. His methodology combines in-depth, qualitative fieldwork with spatial analysis, multivariate statistics & mapping. He received his B.A and his M.A in Geography from the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon.
Website
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Sanaz Mobasseri
Sanaz Mobasseri is an Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business. She received her PhD from the Management of Organizations Department at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business. Her research examines the role of emotion, cognition, and culture in shaping social networks and labor market outcomes. Much of her work is situated in organizational settings, where she examine the microfoundations of workplace inequality. Although grounded in sociology and organizational theory, her work integrates theoretical insights from social psychology and sociolinguistics. Her research methods are similarly diverse, ranging from experimental studies in the lab to audit studies in the field to computational approaches applied to large archival data sets.
Website
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Hussein Mohsen
Hussein is a PhD student in Computational Biology & Bioinformatics at Yale University supported by the Nicholas Jabr and Gruber Science Fellowships. His research interests are at the confluence of deep learning, cancer genomics, and computational social science. He received a BS in Computer Science from the Lebanese American University (LAU) and an MS in Bioinformatics at Indiana University.
Website
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Zanele Munyikwa
Zanele Munyikwa is a PhD student in Information Technologies at the MIT Sloan School of Management. She studies the role of networks, platforms, and people in the rapidly changing digital economy. Zanele's current research focuses on the future of work and the economics of social networks. She holds a Bachelors degree in Computer Science from Duke University, and spent two years as a Research Fellow at Stanford Graduate School of Business.
Website
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Trang (Mae) Nguyen
Trang (Mae) Nguyen (Nguyễn Thu Trang) is the John N. Hazard Fellow in Comparative Law at New York University School of Law, U.S.-Asia Law Institute, and visiting scholar at University of California Berkeley School of Law. Her research uses mixed methods analysis to study authoritarian legality. Mae earned a J.D. degree from NYU School of Law, where she was a Mitchell Jacobson Law & Leadership Fellow and executive editor of the New York University Law Review.
Image of Stan Oklobdzija
Stan Oklobdzija
Stan Oklobdzija is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Science at UC San Diego. His dissertation project focuses on how changes to US election law allowed networks of interest groups to take over roles previously held by political parties. His research interests revolve around campaign finance, election law and state politics. Prior to graduate school, he worked as a reporter at the Sacramento Bee.
Website
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Anne Helby Petersen
Anne Petersen is a research assistant at the Section of Biostatistics, Copenhagen University, Denmark. She has a MSc in statistics, a BSc in mathematics and a keen interest in sociology. She is the primary developer of two R-packages on CRAN, dataMaid and PCADSC. Her research interests are focused on the methodological challenges related to modeling observational data and in particular how this type of information can be used to understand the interplay between social inequality and health.
Website
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Iacopo Pozzana
Iacopo holds a masters in physics from the University of Pisa and is currently pursuing a PhD in computer science at Birkbeck, University of London. In his research, he uses tools from network science, machine learning and natural language processing to study human behaviour on social media, currently focusing on platforms granting an high degree of anonymity to their users. Previously, he has worked on social bot detection and on temporal network modelling.
Image of Francesco Rampazzo
Francesco Rampazzo
Francesco is pursuing a PhD in Social Statistics and Demography at the University of Southampton, while being a Doctoral Fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Demographic Research. He holds a Master’s degree in Demography from Stockholm University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Statistics from the University of Padova. Having moved around Europe for his university education, he understands how important it is to complement traditional data sources on migrants, with digital data sources for capturing the actual movements of individuals. His PhD focuses on the use of digital data for describing demographic events, such as European migration, male fertility, and patterns of transition to adulthood.
Website
Image of Leah Rosenzweig
Leah Rosenzweig
Leah just completed her PhD in political science at MIT, where she was a member of MIT GOV/LAB and the Political Methodology Lab. Her research focuses on citizens’ political behavior in developing countries. Her current book project investigates the puzzle of why citizens vote in elections with foregone conclusions. Using survey and experimental methods, she analyzes the role that social norms play in motivating turnout among citizens in semi-authoritarian states. Leah will be joining the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse, France as a postdoctoral research fellow in the fall.
Website
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Martijn Schoonvelde
Martijn Schoonvelde is a postdoctoral fellow in Political Science at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam where he uses automated text analysis to study on leader communication in the European Union during times of crisis. Before this, he was a Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, and a research fellow at the University of Exeter in the UK. He received his PhD from Stony Brook University. His interests include comparative political behavior, EU politics and research methods. He tweets under @hjms.
Website
Image of Carsten Schwemmer
Carsten Schwemmer
Carsten Schwemmer is currently pursuing a PhD in Sociology at Bamberg University, Germany. His research focuses on computational methods for the study of ethnic minorities and social media communication. Carsten is particularly interested in natural language processing, data mining and software development. He also teaches computational social science at Bamberg University and Humboldt University of Berlin.
Website
Image of Ieke de Vries
Ieke de Vries
Ieke de Vries is pursuing a PhD in Criminology and Justice Policy at Northeastern University. Her current research aims to address the legitimate contours of crime by building and analyzing novel, digitized data sets utilizing computational methods. She has collaborated with federal, state and local agencies in the U.S. and gained research and policy experience while researching crime in several other countries including the Netherlands where she worked for the Dutch Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings.
Image of Taylor Brown
Taylor Brown
Taylor Brown is a doctoral student in the Duke Sociology department, and is associated with the Duke Network Analysis Center. She has broad interests in computational methods and social media studies. Her dissertation explores gender inequality in creative professions. Taylor holds an MA in sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill and an MSc in evidence-based social intervention from the University of Oxford. Prior to beginning her PhD, Taylor fulfilled an appointment at the National Science Foundation in the division of Social and Economic Sciences.
Image of Haohan Chen
Haohan Chen
Haohan Chen is a doctoral student in the Duke Political Science Department. He studies the formation and expression of political preferences in authoritarian regimes in the social media era. His current research uses computational models to simulate how people in authoritarian regimes strategically falsify their political preferences with different parts of their social network and how authoritarian regimes respond. He applies a combination of machine learning and causal inference methods to text data from social media sites of China to test empirical implications of his computational models. Prior to graduate school, Haohan earned a BA from the University of Hong Kong.
Image of Marcus Mann
Marcus Mann
Marcus Mann is a doctoral student in the Duke Sociology department. He uses computational methods to examine politically partisan news ecologies on social media and maintains a general interest in the cultural differentiation of epistemic authorities and their corresponding audiences, communities, and social movements.
Website
Image of Friedolin Merhout
Friedolin Merhout
Friedolin Merhout is a doctoral student in the Duke Sociology department. He enjoys exploring how computational methods provide a new lens to view longstanding social science debates, and pondering the potential inherent in the wealth of digital trace data. Before starting the doctoral program at Duke, he earned a BA from Freie Universitaet in his hometown Berlin.
Image of Janet Xu
Janet Xu
Janet Xu is a doctoral student in the Princeton Sociology department, where she is also affiliated with the Office of Population Research. Her current research examines perceptions and portrayals of demographic diversity using experimental and computational methods. She holds a B.A. from the University of Chicago. Prior to graduate school, Janet worked at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) as a survey researcher.

New York University

All Participants


Image of Adaner Usmani
Adaner Usmani
Adaner Usmani is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Watson Institute at Brown University. He received his PhD in Sociology from NYU. His dissertation examined the rise and fall of labor movements over the 20th and early 21st centuries, and considered the effects of these facts for political change. In other work, he has written about American mass incarceration, with an eye on the racial politics of its origins and reproduction.
Website
Image of Siwei Cheng
Siwei Cheng
Siwei Cheng is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at New York University. Her research focuses on stratification and mobility, work and family, social networks, and quantitative methodology.
Website
Image of Jennifer Hill
Jennifer Hill
Jennifer Hill is a Professor of Applied Statistics and Data Science at New York University. She is the Co-Director of the Center for Practice and Research at the Inersection of Information, Society and Methodology, and Co-Director of the Masters of Science Program in Applied Statistics for Social Science Research.
Website
Image of Arthur Spirling
Arthur Spirling
Arthur Spirling is an Associate Professor of Politics and Data Science at New York University. He is the Deputy Director and the Director of Graduate Studies at the Center for Data Science, and Chair of the Education and Training Working Group of the Moore-Sloan Data Science Environment. He specializes in political methodology and legislative behavior, with an interest in the application of texts-as-data, Bayesian statistics, item response theory and generalized linear models in political science.
Website
Image of Myeong Lee
Myeong Lee
Myeong is a Ph.D. candidate studying information science at the University of Maryland at College Park. He is a Junior Fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of Communities and Information (CASCI), a research network in the iSchool; also, he is a Data Science & Technology Fellow at The Center for Open Data Enterprise, a non-profit that advocates for open data movements.His research interests are in understanding the dynamics of cities, local groups, and local information inequality by making use of computational methods and social theories. He also designs and implements systems that demonstrate geographically-embedded structures of information and associated issues.
Website
Image of Anna Skarpelis
Anna Skarpelis
Anna Skarpelis is completing her PhD in Sociology at New York University and will be joining Harvard University as postdoctoral fellow in the Fall. Her dissertation, Making the Master Race, investigates racial anxiety and the consequences of ethnoracial classification practices in multi-ethnic empires (specifically 20th century Germany and Japan). She is also working on a project that leverages computational text analysis to better understand how sociologists use theoretical concepts in their own work. When she isn't translating obscure Japanese and German texts into English, she likes to read up on political philosophy, the sociology of morality and the philosophy of science. Equipped with a slightly odd sense of humor after years spent in archives researching fascists, she has performed at UCB New York and is writing her first satirical novel on David Thoreau.
Website
Image of Crystal Moore
Crystal Moore
Crystal A. Moore is a doctoral student at the Stanford Graduate School of Education in the programs on education policy, organizational theory and the sociology of education. She works with Linda Darling-Hammond, Ben Domingue and Mitchell Stevens at Stanford. Crystal has an undergraduate degree in public policy from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and a master’s degree in elementary education from the University of Pennsylvania.
Website
Image of Claire Cullen
Claire Cullen
Claire Cullen is a PhD student at the University of Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government and a consultant at the World Bank Gender Innovation Lab. Her current research in development economics focuses on understanding the role of social norms and networks in women’s economic empowerment and intimate partner violence. She uses a range of methods including randomized control trials, lab-in-the-field experiments and machine learning techniques to better understand gender discrimination and challenges in international development. Claire has a Bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Sydney and a Master’s degree in International Development Policy from Georgetown University.
Website
Image of Andrew Wolf
Andrew Wolf
Andrew Wolf is a PhD Student in Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests center around issues of globalization in relation to its impact on labor markets and labor movements. In particular, he studies how labor movements and governments are responding to emerging labor market forms such as the gig economy.
Website
Image of Elliot Stoller
Elliot Stoller
Elliot Stoller is PhD student in Organizational Behavior at Harvard. He researches government bureaucracies and socioeconomic interest groups, focusing on questions about legitimacy, power, and organizational change. He currently studies organizational dynamics involved in the regulatory rule-making process. He holds a BA from Stanford, and previously worked in energy policy for New York State and as research assistant focusing on institutional change.
Website
Image of Fangqi Wen
Fangqi Wen
Fangqi Wen is a PhD candidate of sociology at New York University. In her dissertation, she uses natural experiments and survey experiments to study 1) the social consequences of China's One-Child Policy, and 2) Americans' perceptions and misperceptions of intergenerational mobility. Her research has been supported by a doctoral dissertation improvement award from the National Science Foundation and the Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS) Short Studies.
Website
Image of Jake Carlson
Jake Carlson
Jake is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. He is currently a Dissertation Fellow with the Institute for Research on Poverty. He was previously a Visiting Scholar at NYU’s Urban Democracy Lab, and a Research Fellow at Participatory Budgeting Project. Jake is an urban and political sociologist, focused on democracy, housing, and changing cities. His dissertation examines the various causes and consequences of gentrification and displacement - and the relationships between the two.
Website
Image of Joanna Pepin
Joanna Pepin
Joanna Pepin is a graduating PhD student in the Department of Sociology at the University of Maryland​​. She will be joining the Population Research Center at the University of Texas - Austin as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the fall. Broadly, she is interested in understanding the ways families reproduce and protect against inequality. Her primary research interests concerns the intersection of couples' relationship processes and gender inequality linked to cultural norms. Her research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences.
Website
Image of Hamid Ikram
Hamid Ikram
Hamid Ikram is an Assistant Professor of Education at the Government College University Faisalabad, Pakistan. He has a Doctorate in Education from the United States specializing in Educational Administration, Leadership and Technology. His doctoral research examined the integration of learning media technologies in teaching math and literacy. His research interest includes teachers’ professional development in advanced learning technologies, and education of low-SES communities. He intends to be a developer and practice computational social science. He is a US Exchange Scholar, Microsoft Certified Educator, and also the recipient of 2018 Digital Inclusion Award. He has published his research in peer-reviewed journals, and presented at renowned international conferences such as AERA, ISTE, AACE, CICE, and LICE. He has also won a best research paper award in ICMEI, France.
Image of Danya Lagos
Danya Lagos
Danya is a PhD student in sociology at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on population-level trends related to transgender health, as well as on survey and computational methodology for demographic research on hard-to-identify populations. She has worked as a research assistant at the Computation Institute's Knowledge Lab.
Image of Gerard Torrats-Espinosa
Gerard Torrats-Espinosa
Gerard Torrats-Espinosa is a doctoral student in Sociology at New York University and a doctoral fellow at the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy. His research interests include inequality and stratification, crime, urban policy, and quantitative methods.
Image of Martina Balestra
Martina Balestra
Martina Balestra is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Technology Management & Innovation at New York University advised by Oded Nov. She is broadly interested in decentralized online platforms and how many diverse, anonymous, non-communicating people can come together to produce complex and high-quality information, artifacts, and communities. Her dissertation work tackles questions related to (1) the emergence and characterization of complex, dynamic user roles in decentralized and networked systems, (2) the structural and motivational determinants of who falls into what role, and (3) how individual, localized patterns of engagement give way to global system behavior.
Website
Image of Venetia Pliastika
Venetia Pliastika
Venetia currently is a research assistant in Computational Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University where she works with RNA mainly on cancer biomarkers and tool development. She is interested in learning how Computer Science methods are applied in other areas and specifically how they can facilitate social research. She studied Computer Science at the University of Pennsylvania.
Website
Image of Bhumika Chauhan
Bhumika Chauhan
Bhumika Chauhan is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at New York University. Her research interests include political sociology, inequality, and work. She is currently working on a project on wage inequality and workforce composition in India. She is also working on a collaborative project that concerns the relationship between the rise of programming and the gender wage gap in the US.
Image of Offer Egozy
Offer Egozy
Offer Egozy is a doctoral student in Sociology at New York University. His research has focused on the criminal justice system and, more recently, the contemporary art world.
Image of Oscar Mendez
Oscar Mendez
Oscar earned his B. A. in economics at Universidad de Monterrey, Mexico on 2008. He then went on to study at the University of California, Davis where he obtained his Ph. D. degree in economics on June 2015. His fields of specialization are Labor Economics, International Trade, and Public Economics. Currently, Oscar is a Program Associate in the Economics program at the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. In August 2018 he will start as Assistant Professor of Economics at Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Mexico.
Image of Anahita Davouudi
Anahita Davouudi
Anahita is a researcher at Complex Adaptive Systems Lab. She received her PhD in Computer Science from University of Central Florid (MS in Electrical Engineering (UTA, 2012), MS in Computer Science (NCSU, 2011), and BS in Computer Engineering (Tehran Polytechnic, Iran, 2009)). Her primary research interest are social recommender systems and social data science with focus on user modeling and personalization.
Image of Ned Crowley
Ned Crowley
Ned Crowley is a PhD student at NYU, where he studies political and economic sociology.
Image of Barum Park
Barum Park
Barum Park is a PhD student in the department of sociology at New York University. His research interests span fields of political sociology, social networks, and social mobility. His current research focuses political polarization and the diffusion of new ideas, formalizing the notion of social space, and detecting class boundaries by conceptualizing occupational mobility patterns as networks carrying flows of workers.

University of Washington

All Participants


Image of Connor Gilroy
Connor Gilroy
Connor Gilroy is pursuing a PhD in sociology at the University of Washington. His research focuses on processes of community formation and change, and social visibility and acceptance of marginalized groups. In his research projects on gay neighborhoods and LGBTQ populations, he combines web and social media data with established data sources such as the US Census to investigate trajectories of neighborhood change, variations in prevalence of LGBTQ identity, and the micro-processes underlying changes in public opinion.
Website
Image of Bernease Herman
Bernease Herman
Bernease Herman is a data scientist and researcher at the University of Washington eScience Institute. Her research focuses on interpretable machine learning with work in fairness, accountability, and transparency. In her work, she collaborates with academic researchers, startups, and non-profits with applications of machine learning across domains. Bernease earned her BS in Mathematics and Statistics from the University of Michigan. She spends her time Olympic weightlifting, rowing, as well as hunting down simplified explanations and analogies for new concepts.
Website
Image of Anna Lauren Hoffmann
Anna Lauren Hoffmann
Anna Lauren Hoffmann is an Assistant Professor with The Information School at the University of Washington. Her research is situated at the intersections of data, technology, culture, and ethics, with particular attention to the ways in which the design and use of information technology can promote or hinder the pursuit of important human values like respect and justice. Her work has appeared in various scholarly journals like New Media & Society, The Library Quarterly, First Monday, and JASIST. Her writing has also appeared in popular outlets, including The Guardian, Slate, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. You can find out more at annaeveryday.com or follow her on Twitter at @anneveryday.
Website
Image of Nina Cesare
Nina Cesare
Nina Cesare holds a PhD in sociology from the University of Washington. She is currently a digital data researcher at the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Her work specializes in using statistical and machine learning approaches to leverage digital trace data as a means of answering social science questions. She has used digital data to explore a variety of topics, including health behaviors, inequality and mourning.
Website
Image of Didier Alia
Didier Alia
Didier Alia is a postdoctoral research associate at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington. Didier is an agricultural economist with broad interests in rural and agricultural development. His research focus on technology adoption and household welfare, and the linkages between the non-farm economy and the transformation of rural spaces in developing countries. He holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Kentucky in 2017, a MSc in Statistics and Economics from ISSEA (Cameroon) and a MSc in Mathematics from the University of Abomey-Calavi (Benin). He is aspiring to use innovative computational social science tools in analyzing economic development questions.
Website
Image of Daniel Anderson
Daniel Anderson
Daniel Anderson is a Research Assistant Professor in the College of Education at the University of Oregon. His research generally focuses on educational measurement and psychometrics, as well as evaluating differences in educational outcomes between schools (and sometimes classrooms within schools). He is particularly interested in how to best measure and evaluate the impact of features of the local community on these educational outcomes, specifically achievement gaps for marginalized groups.
Website
Image of Alina Arseniev-Koehler
Alina Arseniev-Koehler
Alina is currently a graduate student at the University of California Los Angeles pursuing a PhD in Sociology. Substantively, her research interests include culture, cognitive sociology, language, and health and illness. Methodologically, she is interested in computational social science and machine-learning, with a focus on the computational analysis of language. Her Master’s research aimed to provide a cognitively plausible, computational account of the schemata activated by news reporting on obesity. Alina also enjoys learning and teaching new computational techniques and helps coordinate the Computational Sociology Working Group at UCLA.
Image of Mike Babb
Mike Babb
Mike Babb is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geography at the University of Washington. He is interested in the spatio-demographic variation in population processes such as mortality, segregation, and political representation with a particular focus on internal migration. Mr. Babb has over a decade of experience in working with GIS, large databases, and the statistical modeling and visualization of data. Mr. Babb has previously worked for the United States Census Bureau and several Seattle-based companies such as Zillow, Community Attributes, and Integral GIS. Most recently, he held research positions with the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology and the e-Science Institute. Currently, he is an instructor in Cartography and GIS at the University of Washington.
Image of Kaylea Champion
Kaylea Champion
Kaylea Champion is a PhD student in Communication at the University of Washington, where she is affiliated with the Community Data Science Collective. Her current research concerns underproduction in online public goods (knowledge and software that people want and need, but which is not being created) and the engagement of marginalized and minoritized people in peer production. Her methods are primarily quantitative and tend to focus on digital trace data. She has a professional background in IT and education, a degree in Critical and Creative Thinking from UMass Boston, in Computer Science from the University of Chicago, and in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago.
Image of Roxana Chiappa
Roxana Chiappa
Roxana is a PhD candidate in Higher Education at the University of Washington - Seattle. She is interested in unmasking how social and economic inequality gets reproduced at emerging economies, looking specifically at the career of doctorate holders, to whom she treats as the most meritocratic "intellectual elite" in the supposed "knowledge society". To complete this task, Roxana's dissertation has combined multiple sources of national surveys, qualitative interview, and CV data of university professors to identify how meritocratic criteria and social network ascription inform the career outcomes of university professors in Chile. In the near future, Roxana will apply similar methodology using data from Mexico and South Africa.
Image of Gregg Colburn
Gregg Colburn
Gregg is an assistant professor in the Department of Real Estate at the University of Washington. Gregg's scholarship focuses on housing policy, affordable housing, and homelessness. In his previous career, he worked as an investment banker and private equity professional. Gregg has a Ph.D. in public affairs from the University of Minnesota, an M.S.W. from the University of Minnesota, and an M.B.A. from Northwestern University.
Website
Image of Jacob Deppen
Jacob Deppen
Jacob is a PhD candidate in Anthropology/Archaeology at UW. His current work is centered on contextual analyses of consumption and entanglement during the Iron Age in Mallorca, Spain. As a member of the Digital Archaeology Research (DigAR) Lab, he is interested in advancing the use of digital technologies and information in archaeology. This includes things like writing code to speed up or automate data analysis, creating novel data visualizations, designing mobile apps, and exploring ways that digital technologies can help archaeologists ask new questions, develop new methods, and generally do better research.
Website
Image of Francisca Gomez Baeza
Francisca Gomez Baeza
Francisca is a PhD student in Sociology at University of Washington. She holds a Master’s degree in Public Policy and Bachelor’s degree in Psychology. Her work has focused mostly on criminology and social control, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Currently, she is studying support for mob violence in Chile using survey data and digital data. She is also broadly interested in critical data science, critical theory, deviance, punishment, feminism, and political economy. Geographically, her main interest is in Latin America in particular, and in the Global South in general.
Image of Kristi Govella
Kristi Govella
Kristi Govella is an Assistant Professor in the Asian Studies Program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. As a political scientist, she uses mixed methods approaches to examine the intersection of comparative politics and international relations in Asia, with a particular focus on Japanese politics, corporate lobbying, regional institutions, and the relationship between economics and security. Her publications include Linking Trade and Security: Evolving Institutions and Strategies in Asia, Europe, and the United States (2012). She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.
Website
Image of Vincent Hopkins
Vincent Hopkins
Vince is a PhD student in Political Science at Simon Fraser University. He specializes in legislative studies, research methods, and interest group lobbying. His dissertation uses data science to generate new knowledge about how interest groups interact with and influence politicians.
Image of Holly Hummer
Holly Hummer
Holly is a PhD student in sociology at Harvard. She studies career and family decisions-making processes using both qualitative and quantitative approaches. She is particularly interested in investigating the use of computational text analysis techniques on interview data.
Image of Parastoo Jabbari
Parastoo Jabbari
Parastoo is a PhD student in Transportation Engineering at University of Washington. She works as graduate research assistant in Sustainable Transportation Lab. Her topics of interest are energy, environmental and equity aspects of transportation systems with secondary interest in data science. Her research has focused on data collection and behavioral modeling activities of the connected & automated vehicles and understanding how increasing levels of vehicle automation could affect residential location choices and travel demand.
Image of Ekaterina (Katya) Jardim
Ekaterina (Katya) Jardim
Ekaterina (Katya) Jardim is a Post-Doc at the Evans School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Washington, where she is working on Seattle Minimum Wage Study. Katya is a labor economist with research focus on local labor markets, labor demand and job search, and expertise on employer-employee matched data. She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Duke University and a M.A. in Economics from the New Economic School. In August 2018, Katya Jardim will be joining Amazon.com as an Economist.
Website
Image of Ian Kennedy
Ian Kennedy
Ian Kennedy is a PhD student in Sociology at the University of Washington, where he studies race and gender using new data and experimental methods. His current work uses Craigslist rental housing listings to examine processes of racial segregation in Seattle. He received his BA from Earlham college in History in 2008, and an MA in experimental humanities from NYU in 2017. He is a recipient of the Clarence and Elissa M. Schrag Graduate Fellowship from the University of Washington.
Image of Charles Kiene
Charles Kiene
Charles Kiene is a social computing researcher and MA / PhD student in the University of Washington's Department of Communication. His work investigates organizational behavior and communication of online communities and gaming teams. He is aspiring to become a mixed methods researcher, combining interview and ethnographic data with computational data to answer social scientific questions from all possible angles.
Image of Savannah Larimore
Savannah Larimore
Savannah is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on the intersection of race, place, and health in the United States with an emphasis on race. Her current research projects investigate how alternative measures of race, including observed race, correspond to health disparities within conventional, self-identified racial and ethnic groups. She is also working on various independent and collaborative research projects on the social determinants of racial and ethnic health disparities. Savannah enjoys traveling, camping, yoga, tennis, and taking advantage of the many restaurants in Seattle.
Website
Image of Sara Blalock Ng
Sara Blalock Ng
Sara Blalock Ng is a PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Washington. Prior to coming to UW, she was an undergraduate in Applied Mathematics and Linguistics at the University of Utah. Her research interests are varied issues in Natural Language Processing, especially computational phonology. She is focused on text-free language processing and processing in low-resource languages. Her current research concerns semantic representations of kinship in spoken dialogue.
Website
Image of Katy Pearce
Katy Pearce
Dr. Katy E. Pearce is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington and holds an affiliation with the Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies. Her research focuses on social and political uses of technologies and digital content in the transitioning democracies and semi-authoritarian states of the South Caucasus and Central Asia, but primarily Armenia and Azerbaijan.
Website
Nandana Rao

Suzanne Spencer

Image of Sondra Stegenga
Sondra Stegenga
Sondra Stegenga MS, OTR/L, M.Ed. is a Ph.D. Candidate and Graduate Research Assistant for the University of Oregon Special Education – Early Intervention program. She holds a Bachelor of Science in behavioral science, Master of Science in occupational therapy, and a Master of Education in educational leadership – special education administration. Her research focuses on early assessment and intervention, research to practice - implementation science in early intervention systems, and early social emotional development and mental health related to school readiness and long-term outcomes. She has been studying the use of big data and non-traditional data sources related to early childhood and early intervention systems with particular attention to ethical use of large scale data in underrepresented and vulnerable populations.
Image of Huatong Sun
Huatong Sun
Associate Professor of Digital Media and Global Design at the University of Washington Tacoma. She researches how to design and innovate for usable, meaningful, and empowering technology in this increasingly globalized world to bridge cultural differences, informed by theories and methodologies from rhetoric and technical communication, human-computer interaction, informatics, intercultural communication, global media studies, British cultural studies, and science and technology studies. She is the author of “Cross-Cultural Technology Design” (Oxford University Press, 2012), and working with Oxford on a new book on global social media design.
Website
Image of Chuck Lanfear
Chuck Lanfear
Chuck is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology whose interests lie in the application of novel statistical and computational methods to questions at the intersection of criminology, sociology, and demography. His research agenda focuses on exploring the emergent properties of human social behaviors embedded in dynamic environments. For example, his current projects broadly examine how demographic and built environment characteristics of places influence social control and situational opportunity to determine the distribution of crime in time and place.

2017


Princeton University

All Participants


Image of Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik
Matthew Salganik is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and he is affiliated with several of Princeton's interdisciplinary research centers: the Office for Population Research, the Center for Information Technology Policy, the Center for Health and Wellbeing, and the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. His research interests include social networks and computational social science. He is the author of the forthcoming book *Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.*
Website
Image of Chris Bail
Chris Bail
Chris Bail is the Douglas and Ellen Lowey Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at Duke University and a member of the Interdisciplinary Program on Data Science, the Duke Network Analysis Center, and the Duke Population Research Institute. His research examines how non-profit organiations and other political actors shape social media discourse using large text-based datasets and apps for social science research. He is the author of *Terrified: How Anti-Muslim Fringe Organizations Became Mainstream*.
Website
Image of Sandra Gonzalez-Baillon
Sandra Gonzalez-Baillon
Sandra González-Bailón is an Assistant Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication, and affiliated faculty at the Warren Center for Network and Data Sciences. Prior to joining Penn, she was a Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, where she is now a Research Associate. Her research lies at the intersection of network science, data mining, computational tools, and political communication. She leads the research group DiMeNet (Digital Media, Networks, and Political Communication).
Website
Image of Deborah Estrin
Deborah Estrin
Deborah Estrin is Associate Dean and Professor of Computer Science at Cornell Tech in New York City and a Professor of Public Health at Weill Cornell Medical College. She is founder of the Health Tech Hub and directs the Small Data Lab at Cornell Tech, which develops new personal data APIs and applications for individuals to harvest the small data traces they generate daily. Estrin is also co-founder of the non-profit startup, Open mHealth.
Website
Image of Gary King
Gary King
Gary King is the Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor at Harvard University, based in the Department of Government (in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences). He also serves as Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. King and his research group develop and apply empirical methods in many areas of social science research, focusing on innovations that span the range from statistical theory to practical application.
Website
Image of Michael Macy
Michael Macy
Michael Macy is the Goldwin Smith Professor of Arts and Sciences in Sociology and Director of the Social Dynamics Laboratory at Cornell. With support from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and Google, his research team has used computational models, online laboratory experiments, and digital traces of device-mediated interaction to explore a variety of familiar but enigmatic social patterns such as critical mass and mobilization, network-based contagion, and political polarization.
Website
Image of Winter Mason
Winter Mason
Winter Mason is a Data Scientist at Facebook. He studies social networks, social media, crowdsourcing, and group dynamics. His research combines traditional psychological methods such as lab experiments with new methods such as online data collection with crowdsourcing and machine learning. His research has appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, among other leading journals. He received his PhD in Social Psychology and Cognitive Science from Indiana University in 2007.
Website
Image of Markus Mobius
Markus Mobius
Markus Mobius is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research who studies the economics of social networks. He builds models of learning, coordination, and cooperation within social networks, with a particular focus on trust. His research employs lab and field experiments to study social networks in real settings. His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Sloan Foundation, and published in leading journals such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. He completed his PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000.
Website
Image of Brandon Stewart
Brandon Stewart
Brandon Stewart is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Princeton University where he is also affiliated with the Politics Department, the Office of Population Research, the Princeton Institute for Computational Science and Engineering, and the Center for the Digital Humanities. His work develops new quantitative statistical methods for applications across computational social science. He completed his PhD in Government at Harvard in 2015. His work develops new tools for automated text analysis.
Website
Image of Vissého Adjiwanou
Vissého Adjiwanou
Vissého Adjiwanou is a Senior Lecturer in Demography and Quantitative Methods at the University of Cape Town (South Africa), and adjunct professor at the Université de Montréal (Canada). His research interests include maternal and reproductive health, family dynamics, and female employment in sub-Saharan Africa. He will chair a session on Family transformation in SSA at the 28th International Population Conference (IPC) in Cape Town. Vissého is also interested in computational science where he tries to document discussions on gender and family formation of African immigrants in the West (Europe and North America) on social media, and their effects on their peers in Africa.
Image of Kathryn Albrecht
Kathryn Albrecht
Kat Albrecht is pursuing a PhD in Sociology at Northwestern University. Her research focuses on investigating how the structure of data shapes research conclusions and broader sociological theory. Using machine learning methods, quantitative causal inference, and mapping techniques she primarily builds and analyzes large criminal justice datasets. She is especially concerned with the economics of fear, the working definition of homicide, and the general state of crime data. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota where she first began exploring the junction of computational methods and the social sciences.
Image of Abdullah Almaatouq
Abdullah Almaatouq
Abdullah Almaatouq is currently a Research Assistant at the Human Dynamics group and pursuing a PhD in Computational Science at MIT. He received dual masters’ in Computational Engineering and Media Arts & Sciences from MIT, and a bachelor degree from the School of Electronics & Computer Science at Southampton University in the UK. Abdullah’s work includes conducting theoretical and empirical research on human behavior using innovative approaches and tools ranging from complex systems theory and agent-based modeling, to network analysis, econometric techniques, and behavioral and experimental methods. Abdullah is passionate about people, their stories, and how they can be understood computationally.
Image of Lisa Argyle
Lisa Argyle
Lisa Argyle is a postdoctoral researcher in the Politics Department at Princeton University. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2016. Her research is in political psychology and political behavior, where she uses a combination of survey data, experiments, and computational methods to examine how people form their political opinions and express those opinions to others. She is particularly interested in understanding the role of interpersonal persuasion in democratic participation.
Image of Elliott Ash
Elliott Ash
Elliott Ash is Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Warwick and Visiting Scholar at Princeton University’s Center for Study of Democratic Politics. Elliott earned a PhD in economics from Columbia University. Elliott's research combines techniques from applied microeconometrics and machine learning for empirical analysis of law and politics, with a focus on text as data. Before obtaining his PhD, Elliott received a BA (Plan II) from University of Texas at Austin, a JD from Columbia Law School, and an LLM (international criminal law) from University of Amsterdam. He also provided consulting work for the Department of Justice investigation of discriminatory practices at Ferguson Police Department.
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Joshua Becker
Joshua Becker is a PhD candidate with the Network Dynamics Group at the University of Pennsylvania with a professional background in facilitation and decision-making. His research on collective intelligence uses formal models and experimental tests to examine how social network structure shapes the quality of group decisions. His current research focuses on how communication networks can be harnessed to tap the wisdom of crowds and improve estimation accuracy on tasks such as financial forecasting and medical diagnoses.
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Anjali Bhatt
Anjali Bhatt is a PhD student in Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Prior to graduate school, she received her bachelor's degree in physics from Harvard and spent several years consulting with organizations on their social impact strategy. Anjali's research focuses on using computational techniques (such as agent-based modeling and text analysis) to understand organizational culture and how it emerges, evolves, and diffuses, as well as ways in which it affects and is affected by diversity and inequality in organizations.
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Moritz Büchi
Moritz Büchi is a Senior Research and Teaching Associate in the Media Change & Innovation Division, Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research (IPMZ), University of Zurich, Switzerland. His research examines new media use, digital inclusion and inequality, online privacy, digital well-being and overuse, and comparative and computational research methods.
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Bo Cowgill
Assistant Professor at Columbia Business School. He received my Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, and won the Kauffman Dissertation Fellowship and Robert Beyster Fellowship. His research interests are in applied microeconomics and strategy, particularly productivity, technological innovation, organizational economics and platforms.
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Anna Filippova
Anna Filippova is a postdoctoral researcher with the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University, where she works towards supporting sustainable open collaborative community development, particularly in the context of Free/Open Source Software and Wikipedia communities. She has received her Ph.D from the National University of Singapore. Her research interests include social norms and conflict in virtual environments, inclusive group processes in diverse teams, and the role of face-to-face events in supporting the development of online peer-production communities. She has also been involved in organizing Free/Open Source community events, such as the Abstractions conference and Ruby monthly meet-ups.
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Connor Gilroy
Connor Gilroy is a PhD student in sociology at the University of Washington. He studies LGBTQ communities and populations to understand social processes of visibility, acceptance, and assimilation. His current research investigates patterns of sociodemographic change in gay neighborhoods. Additionally, he has projects on improving demographic estimates of queer populations with social media data and on using agent-based models to explore the macro-level impacts of the interpersonal process of coming out as LGBTQ.
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Ian Gray
Ian Gray is pursuing a PhD in the Department of Sociology at the University of California Los Angeles. He was previously a Research Fellow at the Medialab of Sciences Po, in Paris, and received a Master in City Planning from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is interested in how environmental problems become economic problems and his current research is focused on the politics of calculating and preparing for the risks and impacts from climate change.
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Jeffrey Jacobs
Jeffrey Jacobs is a PhD student in Political Science at Columbia University. His research aims to utilize natural language processing, network analysis, and machine learning techniques to gain new insights into the history of political thought, labor and community organizing, economic inequality, and online labor markets. Before coming to Columbia he received an MS in Computer Science from Stanford University and Bachelor's degrees in Mathematics, Computer Science, and Economics from the University of Maryland.
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Ridhi Kashyap
Ridhi Kashyap is a postdoctoral research fellow at Nuffield College at the University of Oxford. Her educational career has spanned four countries – after an undergraduate at Harvard, she did a master’s degree between Germany and Spain, and recently finished her DPhil (PhD) in demography and sociology jointly affiliated with the University of Oxford, UK and the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany. Her research projects span a number of substantive areas in demography, including gender and other social inequalities in demographic processes, marriage and fertility change, mortality and health, and ethnicity and migration. She is also interested in methodological innovations in population studies including agent-based, microsimulation and ‘big data’ approaches.
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Antje Kirchner
Antje Kirchner is a Research Survey Methodologist at RTI International and an Adjunct Research Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln. Her research addresses challenges in survey methodology, including ways to examine nonresponse bias using machine learning techniques, adaptive/responsive design, assessing the quality of survey and administrative data, eliciting and analyzing answers to sensitive questions,detecting problems in the respondent-interviewer interaction, and how to improve response quality in web surveys using paradata. Her research has been published in journals such as Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology, and Journal of the American Statistical Association.
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Peter Krafft
Peter Krafft is a graduating PhD student at MIT co-advised by Sandy Pentland and Josh Tenenbaum, soon to be living the bohemian life of an itinerant postdoc. His main formal training is in statistics, machine learning, and computer science, but he now studies computational social science and collective intelligence, often from the perspective of cognitive science. His current research focuses on understanding how people form beliefs about the world through their own exploration and through interaction with each other.
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Molly Lewis
Molly Lewis is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Chicago and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on understanding how linguistic meaning varies across development and across speakers of different languages. She is also interested in issues related to scientific replicability and reproducibility. She received her PhD in Developmental Psychology from Stanford University and her BA in Linguistics from Reed College.
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Charlotte Lloyd
Charlotte Lloyd is a PhD candidate in Sociology with a secondary field certificate in Computational Science and Engineering. Her mixed methods research, including new computational methods for social science, focuses on how symbolic and cultural boundaries are related to structural inequality within organizations and communities. Charlotte received her B.A. in Comparative Literature and Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2011.
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Allison Morgan
Allison Morgan is pursuing her Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is interested in using data mining, machine learning, social network analysis and causal inference to develop and test hypotheses about the origins and effects of gender imbalance within academia. Prior to graduate school, Allison worked as a data scientist for two years at a small tech start-up in Portland, OR. She earned her B.A. in physics from Reed College.
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Matti Nelimarkka
Matti Nelimarkka is a PhD Candidate at University of Helsinki and Aalto University with background both in political science and computer science. His research interests include supporting participation in various contexts (e.g., classroom, political participation) and studying online political communication. His work spans from human-computer interaction to political science and has often interdisciplinary nature. He's also the cofounder of computational social science study program at University of Helsinki.
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Kivan Polimis
Kivan Polimis is an incoming postdoctoral research fellow at Bocconi University’s Dondena Centre for Research on Social Dynamics and Public Policy. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Washington (UW) in 2017. Recently, Kivan has enjoyed facilitating public-private partnerships as the program coordinator for UW’s Data Science for Social Good, a Civic Technology and Engagement Fellow with Microsoft, and a Big Data-Scientist Training Enhancement Program (BD-STEP) Predoctoral Fellow with the Department of Veteran Affairs. His research focuses on health development and applying statistical techniques to investigate disparities in health care, transportation, and the legal system.
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Ethan Porter
Ethan Porter is an assistant professor at George Washington University in the School of Media and Public Affairs. He received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 2016. His dissertation, The Consumer Citizen, investigates the ways in which everyday consumer decision-making affects political attitudes and behavior. His research interests include public opinion, political communication, political psychology, and experimental design. He has received grants from the National Science Foundation and the Omidyar Network. His research has appeared in Political Communication, and he has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post and other publications.
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Maria Y. Rodriguez
Maria Y. Rodriguez is an Assistant Professor at the Silberman School of Social Work at the City University of New York’s Hunter College. She received her Ph.D from the University of Washington (Seattle). Her research interests intersect demography, data science, housing policy and social welfare. Currently, she has three active areas of research - (1) identifying the impacts of the U.S. foreclosure crisis on Latinos; (2) exploring how supervised machine learning can be used to scale up theoretically driven qualitative coding, and (3) using Twitter to understand the lived experience of marginalized communities in the United States.
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Hirokazu Shirado
Hirokazu Shirado is a researcher in the field of social networks and human-machine interactions. he is taking courses to complete his doctorate in Department of Sociology at Yale University where he has also studied at Human Nature Lab at Yale Institute for Network Science. His current research focuses on the experimental analysis of the emergence of cooperative action in social networks. His goal is to engineer social systems with more affordable participation. His study was published by Nature, Nature Communications, and other journals.
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Rochelle Terman
Rochelle Terman is a post-doc at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science with a designated emphasis in Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research examines international norms, gender and advocacy, with a focus on the Muslim world, using a mix of quantitative, qualitative and computational methods. She also teaches computational social science in a variety of capacities.
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Adaner Usmani
Adaner Usmani is a postdoctoral fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University. His dissertation examines the rise and fall of labor movements over the 20th and early 21st centuries, and considers the effects of these facts on politics and public opinion. In other work, he has written about American mass incarceration, with an eye on the racial politics of its origins and reproduction.
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Tong Wang
Tong Wang is an Assistant Professor of Management Sciences at the Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2016. Her general research interests include interpretable machine learning and applied data mining, with its application in computational criminology, healthcare, social marketing, etc. Her research on crime data mining is the second place winner in 'Doing Good with Good OR' at INFORMS 2015. Her work on crime data mining has been reported in multiple media including Wikipedia.
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Michael Yeomans
Michael Yeomans is a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University. He studies the Behavioral Science of Big Data - how new datasets and algorithms are changing our daily life, and expanding the researcher toolbox in social science. Michael completed his undergraduate degree in Psychology at the University of Toronto and in 2014, and completed a PhD and an MBA in Behavioral Science at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.
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Taylor Brown
Taylor Brown is a doctoral student in the Duke Sociology department, and is associated with the Duke Network Analysis Center. She has a general fascination with computational methods and the issues that arise with social media and other found data. She holds an MA in sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill and an MSc in evidence-based social intervention from the University of Oxford. Prior to beginning her PhD, Taylor worked on issues of intercountry adoption abuse and for a non-profit in Ghana. She also fulfilled an appointment at the National Science Foundation in the division of Social and Economic Sciences.
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Yo-Yo Shuang Chen
Shuang (Yo-Yo) Chen is a doctoral student in demography and social policy at Princeton University. Previously, she worked as a consultant at Oxford Policy Management and a program officer for the International Household Survey Network/Accelerated Data Program, providing technical assistance to statistical offices in developing countries. She has also consulted for the World Bank on education projects. She holds a master’s degree in international education policy analysis and a bachelor’s degree in mathematics with honors in education from Stanford University.